Power Napping

It has been proven that taking a power nap during the day has many benefits. A nap can lower blood pressure and also reduce the level of stress.

Research has shown that the benefits of a midday power nap are determined by the length of the time a person spends napping. A nap that lasts 20 minutes will help alertness and will also increase motor function. Naps that last 30 to 60 minutes will improve decision-making skills, and a nap that lasts 60 to 90 minutes will improve the ability to solve creative problems. Most people will only be able to take a short nap. A person who naps longer than 20 or 30 minutes runs the risk of waking up and feeling groggy.

If your typical day starts at 7:00 AM and you go to bed for the night around 11:00 PM, then napping between 1:30 and 3:00 PM is when you will benefit from a power nap the most.

If you are having difficulty getting a good night’s sleep, specialists at Jamaica Hospital’s Sleep Center can conduct sleep studies to help determine the causes of your sleep deprivation. To schedule an appointment for an evaluation, please call 718-206-5916

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Back Pack Safety Month

September is National School Backpack Safety Month and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is sharing information on how you can help your child avoid the pain and injury that is associated with carrying heavy backpacks.  These simple tips can help protect your child from having chronic back pain throughout their lives.

Backpacks are essential back-to- school items for kids.  They come in different colors, sizes and shapes and most importantly they help children to carry their belongings.  Backpacks are preferred by many in comparison to shoulder bags because when worn correctly, they evenly distribute weight across the body.  However, if worn incorrectly they can cause back pain or injuries and eventually lead to poor posture.

To prevent problems associated with improper backpack use, parents should first purchase a backpack that has the following features:

  • Lightweight
  • Wide and padded straps
  • Multiple compartments
  • Padded back
  • Waist belt
  • Correct size (A backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso).

Practicing these safety tips will further reduce the chance of back pain or injuries caused by backpacks:

  • When packing, heavier items should be placed to the back and center of the backpack. Lighter items should be in front. Sharp objects such as scissors or pencils should be kept away from your child’s back.  Utilizing different compartments can help in distributing weight.
  • Do not over pack. Doctors recommend that children should not carry backpacks that weigh more than 10-15% of their body weight.
  • Ensure that children use both straps. Using a single strap can cause muscle strain.
  • Adjust the straps so that the backpack fits closely to your child’s back and sits two inches above the waist. This ensures comfort and proper weight distribution.
  • Encourage children to use their lockers or desks throughout the day to drop off heavy books.

The Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America recommends that parents should always look for warning signs that indicate backpacks may be too heavy. If your child struggles to put on and take off the backpack, they are complaining of numbness or tingling or if there are red strap marks on their shoulders -It may be time for you to lighten their load.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

 

The month of September has been designated as National Prostate Cancer Awareness

Month to bring attention to this very common form of cancer that affects so many men. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men and is the second leading cancer related cause of death in men. Although it is not known exactly what causes prostate cancer some risk factors for developing it are:

  •  Older age (more than 65% of prostate cancers are diagnosed in men older than 65)
  • Race (African-American men are 60% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men)
  • Family history (having a father or brother with prostate cancer)
  • Obesity

The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive system that produces a fluid that mixes with sperm and other fluids during ejaculation. It sits just below the bladder and is normally about the side of a walnut.

Prostate cancer, especially in its early stages, may not have any symptoms. When symptoms are present they may include difficulty starting urination, less force to the stream of urine, dribbling at the end of urination, needing to urinate frequently, urinating frequently at night, pain while urinating, blood in the urine or semen, difficulty starting or maintaining an erection, pain with ejaculation, pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, pelvis and upper thighs, or unintended weight loss.

When screening is done there are two tests that are available. The available tests are a digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.  To perform a digital rectal exam your doctor uses a gloved finger, inserted a few inches into your rectum, to check your prostate gland.  A prostate-specific antigen test is a blood test that measures the level of PSA in your blood.  Many men who have prostate cancer have elevated levels of PSA, however PSA can also be elevated for less serious causes such as prostate enlargement or infection.

Further testing is needed to diagnose cancer. Additional tests that your doctor may recommend to diagnose cancer include an ultrasound of the prostate and a biopsy of the prostate.  A biopsy is when a small piece of the prostate is removed to look for abnormal cells.

Treatment of prostate cancer depends on many factors including your age, your overall health and the growth and spread of the cancer when it is diagnosed. Some men who have slow growing tumors may not need treatment right away and some may never need treatment.  Other types of prostate cancer are aggressive and can quickly spread to other parts of the body making treatment difficult.  Common treatment options include watchful waiting or expectant management (regular testing and checkups to assess for new signs or symptoms), radiation therapy (high-energy x-rays used to kill cancer cells), chemotherapy, surgery (having the prostate gland removed) and hormone therapy.

To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss a prostate cancer screening, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Suicide Prevention Week

Suicide affects millions; over 800,000 people take their lives each year, and the number of people who attempt suicide is twenty five times that amount. In addition to the lives lost, suicide also affects the many friends and family members devastated by the loss of their loved one.

Suicide is largely preventable though. Through education and awareness, we can get those people who are contemplating suicide the help they need.

One of the best tools in preventing suicide is to know the risk factors. Over 90% of people who attempt suicide live with depression or another mental disorder. Alcohol or substance abuse is often a contributing factor. Adverse factions to traumatic events or stress can also lead to someone wanting to take their own life.Other risk factors for suicide include:

• Family history of mental disorder or substance abuse
• Family history of suicide
• Family violence
• Physical or sexual abuse
• Keeping firearms in the home
• Chronic physical illness, including chronic pain
• Exposure to the suicidal behavior of others

Someone who is considering suicide usually displays certain behaviors. Loved ones should look for the following warning signs:

Always talking or thinking about death
Trouble sleeping and eating — that gets worse over time
Displaying reckless behavior that could result in death, such as driving fast or running red lights
Losing interest in things one used to care about
Making comments about being hopeless, helpless, or worthless
Talking about suicide or killing one’s self
Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

If someone you know appears to be contemplating suicide, take the issue seriously. Let the person know that you care and understand and are listening and attempt to get them immediate help from a health care professional.

If your loved one appears to be in imminent danger of committing suicide, do not leave him or her alone. Remove any weapons or drugs he or she could use. Accompany him or her to the nearest emergency room or call 911.

The week of Sept. 10th has been designated World Suicide Prevention Week. Many organizations from around the world have joined this cause. Jamaica Hospital’s supports their efforts and the hospital’s Department of Psychiatry offers many inpatient and outpatient services to help those in need.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sickle Cell Awareness Month

September has been designated National Sickle Cell Awareness Month to bring attention to this genetic disease that affects an estimated 100,000 Americans.

Sickle cell disease is an inherited form of anemia – a condition in which red blood cells are unable to carry oxygen throughout the body. For most, red blood cells are round and can move easily through blood vessels, but the red blood cells in people with sickle cell disease are crescent, or half-moon shaped. These irregular shaped cells can get stuck in blood vessels, which can slow or block the flow of oxygen to certain parts of the body.

In addition to being irregular in shape, sickle cells are fragile and break apart easily. Normal red blood cells live an average of four months before they die and need to be replaced. Sickle-shaped cells however only live an average of 20 days. The result of this shortage of blood cells is a loss of energy and general sense of fatigue.
Other symptoms of sickle cell disease include:

• Hand-Foot Syndrome – Often the first sign of sickle cell disease. It is caused by a lack of blood flow to the hands and feet

• Episodes of Pain – Referred to as a “crisis”, these episodes of pain occur when blood flow is blocked to the chest, abdomen, and joints. The frequency and duration of the episodes vary from person to person, but in severe cases, they can result in hospitalization.

• Frequent Infections and Fever– Sickle Cell can cause damage to the spleen, an organ that fights infection, making those with sickle cell at greater risk of developing an infection and an accompanying fever.

• Changes in Skin – People with sickle cell disease can develop a yellow tint to their skin or the whites of their eyes. Skin and nail beds can often become pale.

• Delayed growth – By not receiving enough oxygen rich red blood cells, those with sickle cell disease may also not get the necessary nutrients essential for growth.

The risk of inheriting sickle cell disease is a genetic one. For a baby to be born with it, both parents must carry the sickle cell gene. Doctors can diagnose sickle cell disease before a child is born. Couples who are at risk for passing on this disease to their children may want to talk with a genetic counselor about prenatal testing. The sickle cell gene is more common in families that come from Africa, India, Carribbean islands, and Central and South America.

To determine if you have sickle cell disease, your doctor can order a test to check for hemoglobin S, the defective form of hemoglobin that underlies sickle cell anemia. Further tests can confirm the existence of one gene (carrying the sickle cell trait) or two genes (sickle cell anemia). For those who have sickle cell anemia, treatment is aimed at treating the symptoms and avoiding crisis. Regular check-ups to monitor your red blood cell count are important. Medications are available to reduce pain and prevent complications can be prescribed, and blood transfusions, supplemental oxygen and even bone marrow transplants may also be necessary.

Jamaica Hospital serves a culturally rich and diverse population. Many members of our community are from the parts of the world most often affected by sickle cell disease. In recognition of National Sickle Cell Awareness Month, Jamaica Hospital’s encourages anyone living with sickle cell disease to carefully manage their condition. The hospital also recommends all potential parents to be tested for the sickle cell trait.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Opens the New Thomas Santucci Jr., MD Cardiovascular Interventional Suite

This summer, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center held a ribbon-cutting ceremony to commemorate the opening of the Thomas Santucci Jr., MD Cardiovascular Interventional Suite, named in honor of the late and beloved cardiologist and former Chairman of the Department of Medicine.

Cath Lab Jamaica QueensJoining the hospital for the occasion were special guests of honor: the family of Dr. Thomas Santucci Jr., Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, Senator Joseph Addabbo and members of Jamaica Hospital’s Board of Trustees. Over 100 guests and the media were also in attendance.

Jamaica Hospital President and CEO, Mr. Bruce J. Flanz welcomed everyone as they buzzed with excitement, to the new, state-of-the-art cardiovascular care facility.

The suite covers 6500 square feet of space and includes two interventional labs, a six-bed recovery unit, a preparation area, as well as viewing, treatment and examination rooms. The facility is also equipped with the latest and most advanced technologies in cardiac and stroke care. Both labs feature Siemens Artis Zee Ceiling- Mounted Systems which provide high patient-positioning flexibility, affording doctors easier and full-body access to patients.

Mr. Flanz explained to guests that all features and amenities of the Cardiovascular Interventional Suite were carefully selected by the Cardiology Department with the goal in mind of meeting the growing needs of patients.

“There is a significant prevalence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and obesity in our area, all of which contribute to the growing incidence of all types of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks and strokes,” shared Dr. Robert Mendelson, Director of Cardiology and Chairman of the Department of Medicine. It is anticipated that admissions for cardiac disease to Jamaica Hospital will increase by 12% in the next five years and stroke admission by 11% during that period.

In addition to treating patients who live within the hospital’s service area, the Cardiovascular Interventional Suite will provide emergency cardiovascular care to the many travelers who fly through JFK Airport.  Each year, approximately 2,500 people are transported to Jamaica Hospital from JFK and 10% of those emergency cases are the result of a cardiac issue or stroke.

“Given the high volume of cardiovascular and stroke cases received by the hospital, the new Thomas Santucci Jr., MD  Cardiovascular Interventional Suite will certainly be of great benefit to a significant number of people,” said Mr. Flanz.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Things You Should Know About Dental Cavities

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that more than 90 percent of the population has had a dental cavity?

The American Dental Association (ADA) defines a dental cavity as, “The destruction of your tooth enamel (the hard outer layer of your teeth) that causes a hole in the tooth.

They further state that when plaque forms on your teeth, combined with eating and drinking foods that contain sugar, the collective bacteria produced attack the tooth enamel.

Some ways you can prevent tooth decay are:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day using fluoride toothpaste.
  • Use floss or interdental cleaner to clean between your teeth daily.
  • Eat healthy, well balanced meals.
  • Limit snacking.

Since cavities mostly happen in adolescents, your dentist may suggest the use of supplemental fluoride or dental sealants (a plastic proactive coating) applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth.

Nothing combats tooth decay more than regular visits to your dentist for professional cleanings and oral examinations.  If you are at low risk of cavities or gum disease, it is recommended that you see your dentist once yearly.  If you are at higher risk, you may need to visit your dentist every three or four months.

If your teeth are in need of a check -up, you can make an appointment with one of our board certified dentists at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center by calling 718-206-6980.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Louise Senior

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Louise Senior, a telephone operator at the Trump Pavilion For Nursing and Rehabilitation, and perhaps better known as the woman who is always smiling at the reception desk in the lobby. Louise started working at the nursing home in 1994. She is extremely proud to tell everyone that five generations of her family have been affiliated with the facility. Her grandmother was a patient and her mother, her daughter and her granddaughter have all worked there.

Louise was born in the Bronx but she really considers herself a native of Queens having moved to Queens Village at the age of eight.  Her early school years were spent at Public School 98 in Bayside, the Louis Pasteur Middle School and Cardozzo High School. Currently, she resides in St. Albans.

Her personal story began at Trump Pavilion when she was 13 years old and would visit her mom who worked there. Years later she experienced a fall and her doctor recommended that she receive physical therapy.  On Louise’s last day of therapy, she happened to see the Director of Communication who asked if she would be interested in coming to work for the facility.  That was 24 years ago and she is still very happy that she said yes to the offer.

Louise feels very fortunate to be working with a wonderful team of people. She enjoys interacting with the patients, their families, and all of her colleagues. She is very proud of the work that she does and feels like she is making a difference in the lives of others.

When Louise is not working she enjoys spending time with her family. She has four granddaughters who she spends a lot of time with. Louise likes to listen to music, especially R&B and she has a passion for cooking all different types of food. Everyone who knows Louise will tell you about her warm personality. She is the nice lady who greets people as they enter with a smile.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mourning the Loss of a Pet

Losing a loved one is one of the hardest experiences we can have. For most people, a pet is like a member of the family. They love us unconditionally and over the course of our lives and theirs, will give us countless hours of joy and happiness. When a pet passes on, it can be devastating. It is very normal to grieve for the loss of a pet in the same way as we would for anyone else in our lives that we love.

Some of the ways we can handle the loss of a pet:

  • Allow yourself time to mourn
  • Think back on all the memories you and your pet created together
  • Try to continue with your life and your daily routine
  • Allow others to offer their condolences
  • Meditation
  • Write a letter to your pet, hold a memorial service, put some items of the pet in a special place in your home.
  • Seek professional help to speak about your feelings

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a mental health therapist, please call 718-206-7160.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You Sure This Burger Isn’t Meat?

 

 

 

 

 

If you are a Vegetarian who has missed the taste and juiciness of an all American beef burger, you may not have to pine any longer.  The rage right now, whether called Impossible, Superiority or Beyond, are meatless burgers that replicate the texture, taste and succulence of meat.

The Washington Post recently highlighted one such burger – Superiority Burger.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup dried red quinoa
  • 1½ cups plus 2 tablespoons water
  • 1¼ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus more as needed
  • 2 medium carrots, scrubbed well and cut into ¼ -inch dice (about 1 cup)
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more as needed for frying
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped (about 1½ cups)
  • 1 tablespoon fennel seed, toasted and ground (see NOTES)
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup cooked or no-salt-added canned chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • ½ cup coarse dried bread crumbs, such as panko
  • ¾ cup walnuts, toasted and crushed (see NOTES)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (from 1 lemon)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon Sriracha or other hot chili sauce
  • 2 tablespoons potato starch
  • 8 soft buns, toasted, for serving

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Combine the quinoa, 1½ cups of the water and ¼ teaspoon of the salt in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and cook until fluffy, 35 to 45 minutes. Uncover, transfer to a large bowl and let cool.

While the quinoa is cooking, spread the diced carrots on a quarter baking sheet; roast (middle rack) until dark around the edges and soft, 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, until it is translucent and lightly browned at the edges, 6 to 7 minutes. Stir in the fennel seed, chili powder, ¼ teaspoon of the pepper and ½ teaspoon of the salt; cook until the spices are very fragrant, 30 seconds. Add the chickpeas and cook, stirring frequently, until they are very tender. Pour in the vinegar; use a spatula to dislodge any browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Use a potato masher or large fork, to coarsely mash the onion-chickpea mixture.

Scrape the onion-chickpea mixture into the bowl with the quinoa. Add the roasted carrots, bread crumbs, walnuts, lemon juice, parsley, Sriracha or other hot chili sauce, the remaining ½ teaspoon of the salt and ¼ teaspoon of the pepper, and mix well. Taste, and add more salt, as needed.

Whisk together the potato starch and the remaining 2 tablespoons of water in a small bowl to form a thick, smooth slurry. Fold that into the burger mixture.

Use a ½ -cup measure to scoop 8 equal portions. Shape each one into a ¾ -inch-thick disk.

Pour the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil into a large saute pan or cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, add as many patties as will fit without overcrowding. Working in batches, pan-fry the patties until browned, about 3 minutes on each side.

To serve, place each patty on a toasted bun.

To read the entire article visit – https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/finally-you-can-make-a-superiority-burger-at-home/2018/05/21/16ee154a-594e-11e8-858f-12becb4d6067_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.467056961aa2

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.