National Hospice and Palliative Care Month

November is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center (JHMC) is joining with the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO),to promote raising awareness about hospice and Palliative Care.  The theme this year is “It’s About How You Live.”  It brings focus on how hospice and Palliative care can offer a person-centered approach to treament that includes expert medical care, comprehensive pain management, and emotional and spiritual support.

When you are faced with the decision of choosing whether palliative care or hospice care better suites the needs of you, or your loved ones; it is best to know the definition and relationship between the two before deciding.

Palliative care focuses on relieving symptoms that are related to a chronic illness, such as cancer, cardiac disease, respiratory disease, kidney failure, Alzheimer’s and other dementias, AIDS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and other neurological diseases. Palliative care can be used at any stage of illness –not just advanced stages.

Hospice care is palliative by nature, but is only offered when the patient has progress to a point where curative treatment is no longer desired. Hospice care supports the patient, and their families, on the journey to end of life focusing on relieving symptoms and offering comfort from pain, shortness of breath, fatigue, nausea, anxiety and insomnia.

Although there are differences between palliative care and hospice care, there is a relationship between the two. Knowing the treatment differences and similarities may be helpful when making your decision, including:

  • Treatments are not limited with palliative care and can range from conservative to aggressive or curative.
  • Hospice care treatments are limited and focus on the palliation of symptoms. The goal is no longer to cure, but to promote comfort.
  • Palliative care can be considered at any time during the course of a chronic illness.
  • With hospice care, Medicare requires that a physician certify that a patient’s condition is terminal. The physician must certify that a patient’s life expectancy is six months or less.
  • Both palliative and hospice care can be delivered at any location.
  • Palliative care services are typically provided through regular physician and nursing visits.
  • Hospice care services are more inclusive than palliative care services. Hospice care includes physician services, nursing services, social worker, spiritual care, bereavement care and volunteers. In some cases physical, occupational, speech and dietary therapy services, as well as other counseling services are deemed necessary as part of the hospice holistic care plan to manage terminal symptoms and provide support for the individual and their family.

It is important to know that choosing palliative care or hospice care is about comfort, control, dignity and quality of life and not about giving up. If you, or a loved one should need information on palliative or hospice care, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Palliative Care and Hospice Care services can help. To schedule an appointment for an evaluation, or to just talk, call 718-206-6914.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Small Changes Affect Your Health

When seeking a routine that can bring wellness to your entire being, you don’t have to climb a mountain in Tibet or strip away all the food you love.  Experts say that the best way to bring a wellness routine into your life is through a series of small changes that will gradually make a difference.

Changes such as:

  • Meditation – Take a moment in the morning to meditate.  It will set the tone of the day and clear your head to prepare for what the day may bring.
  • Music – Play calming music.  The body’s internal rhythms sync with the rhythms of music.  By focusing on the music and its melody, you will start of feel your breathing and heart rate begin to slow down, bringing you to a much calmer place.
  • Plan a trip – According to research, happiness spikes when planning a trip.  Shut down your smartphone – When the impulse to pick up your phone comes, and you resist it, you may feel a wave of anxiety.  Don’t panic!  Breathy through the anxiety and you will see that there is a calm that will follow.
  • Breathe deeply – Sit in a comfortable place, breathe naturally and settle your attention on your breath.  With each inhale and exhale, mentally repeat the words “in” and “out.”  Even if your mind wanders, don’t get distracted; just bring your attention back to your breathing.
  • Email – Don’t check your email when you first wake up.  Instead, sit silently and allow your mind to wander.  Take 10 minutes to just center yourself before you start your day.
  • Walk – Use part of your lunch break to take a walk.  This activity will aid with digestion, keep you active and relieve stress.

No one likes change and it rarely comes easy.  That’s why slowly incorporating small steps toward your goals overtime can lead to huge changes in the long run.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Journaling Help Relieve Stress and Anxiety

Did you know that keeping a journal is a great tool for relieving anxiety and stress?  According to Verywellmind.com, “Journaling can relieve stress by helping you work through your anxious feelings.”

By journaling, you can minimize thoughts that may have you anxious.  Writing down what is causing you to stress may help you shift feelings of fear and hopelessness to empowerment and solution orientated thoughts.

Some tips on how to get started are:

  • Start journaling for five to 15 minutes – Too much time shouldn’t be spent on your journaling. Write about what is concerning you most.
  • If an event is currently causing difficulty write it down in detail. If it is not a current issue, but something that has been plaguing you, focus on writing that you worry about the “what could possibly happen” factor.
  • Write how these feelings affect you in your daily life
  • Once your thoughts are arranged, you can write about what positive measures you can implement to help relive how you are feeling (i.e. meditation, exercise, support groups)

The hardest part about journaling is getting started.  Many people think that they don’t have the time to journal, but if you have the time to fret, you have the time to put pencil to paper and work on feeling better!

For more tips on how to benefit from journaling visit – www.verywellmind.com

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tubal Reversal Offered at Jamaica Hospital

For women, the decision to have tubal ligation, or getting their “tubes tied,” is a difficult one, but that decision no longer needs to be a permanent one. Doctors at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center now offer a tubal reversal procedure for women, giving them the opportunity to become pregnant again.

Tubal reversal is a simple, minimally invasive procedure that reconnects the fallopian tubes and restores their ability to function after a previous sterilization procedure. The surgery is performed by trained doctors, who use specially designed instruments to gain access to the fallopian tubes. The ends of the damaged tubes are reconstructed and repaired. Once the surgery is complete, testing will be performed to make sure that the tubes are open or “patent.”

Dr. Khaled Zeitoun, Reproductive Endocrinologist and Infertility Gynecologist, perform this procedure with great success at Jamaica Hospital. “This procedure gives women a second chance at having a baby,” states Dr. Zeitoun. “The effectiveness of tubal reversal is approximately above 50% and is a much more affordable fertility option than other procedures such as IVF (in vitro fertilization).”

While the overall success rate for conception is high for those who have tubal reversal surgery, there are some factors that affect this success, such as the degree of damage to the tubes during the original tubal ligation procedure, the weight and health status of the patient and other medical factors in the patient and the partner.

The procedure traditionally takes from 2-4 hours and recovery time is minimal. “In most cases, patients can try to become pregnant during their next ovulation cycle and every cycle after that, which is another benefit when compared to other options which only allow patients one chance of conception,” explains Dr. Zeitoun.

To learn more about the tubal reversal procedure or to schedule an appointment with Dr. Zeitoun, please call 718-206-7642.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Crystal Faninn

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Crystal Fannin, Emergency Department Registrar Supervisor. One of the many things that make Crystal special is that she has been working in the same department for over 39 years. Jamaica Hospital has been her only job and she is very proud to tell that to everyone she meets. She is very proud of the fact that she signed one of the bricks that was used to build the new main building and was also one of the people who got to sign the last steel beam placed in the new Trump Pavilion.

Crystal was born in Brooklyn and moved to Queens when she was 11 years old. She attended Andrew Jackson High School and currently lives in the St. Albans area. She has two children, a son and a daughter and two grandchildren. Her children and grandchildren were all born at Jamaica Hospital so she has experience on many levels of the quality care people receive.

Though Crystal spends much of her time at work, she does have a variety of things that she enjoys in her free time. She loves to cook, all types of food but her favorite is soul food, especially ribs and cornbread. She enjoys all kinds of music, in particular funk and jazz, and at one time she even played the drums. One of her favorite activities is going to the racetrack. Crystal says you only live once and you have to have fun. To prove her point, she has gone skydiving twice.

Over the years, Crystal has done just about everything an emergency room registrar can do. She knows many of the patients by name because she has seen them so many times. She can be described as a real people person. Everyone who meets her feels her sincerity and compassion. Jamaica Hospital is like a family to her and that is why she enjoys coming to work every day. Crystal feels very strongly about giving back to the hospital and the community. She and her mother raised money, much of it their own, to buy toys for the children during holiday time.

She is truly an important part of the Jamaica Hospital family and we are happy to be able to shine the spotlight on her this month.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Breast Feeding After Augmentation

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), breast augmentation has become the #1 cosmetic procedure for the last decade. Since the best age for breast augmentation is anywhere from 18 to 50 years old, a woman’s desire to look younger may overlap with the tick of her biological clock.

One of the most popular questions women ask before having surgery is, “Will I be able to breastfeed?”

The answer is, yes. Breastfeeding after breast augmentation is absolutely possible.

Although the prior condition of the breasts, position of the implant and incision could have a direct bearing on milk production, it is very likely that you will have a positive experience when nursing your child.

If you have any questions regarding breastfeeding your baby, you can call Jamaica Hospital’s Lactation Consultant at 718-670-4200 for answers to FAQ’s.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

DANGERS OF INFANT WALKERS

The American Association of Pediatrics’ (AAP), has recommended a ban on infant walkers as a result of a recent study that revealed over  230,000- children less than 15 months old were treated for infant walker related injuries in U.S. emergency departments from 1990 to 2014. The majority of injuries were to the head or neck noting that the injuries were sustained by falling down stairs in their infant walker.

HealthyChildren.org states that most walker injuries happen while an adult is watching.  Even the most attentive parent or caregiver cannot respond quickly enough to prevent a child from falling since a child in a walker can move more than 3 feet in 1 second.  That is why walkers are never safe to use, even with an adult close by.

The AAP recommends that instead of infant walkers, parents choose:

  • Stationary activity centers – They resemble walkers without wheels.  They often  have seats that rotate, tip and bounce.
  • Play yards or playpens – These can be used as safety zones for children as they learn to sit, crawl or walk.
  • High chairs – As your child grows, they can enjoy sitting in a high chair to play with toys on the tray.

Before 1997, there weren’t any standards for baby walkers in place.  These standards caused manufacturers to make the base of a walker wider so as to not fit through most door ways and having brakes that stop them at the edge of a step.  Although necessary, these improvements cannot and have not prevented all injuries from walkers.

Research has shown that walkers do not provide any advantage to accelerating a child’s development.  In fact, they may hinder development because they do not teach infants to walk.  A better practice is to allow your baby the freedom in a safe environment that allows them the opportunity for pulling themselves up, creeping and crawling.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

EATING FOR ENERGY

If you conducted a survey, most people will tell you that between the hours of 3:00PM and 4:00PM each day, a feeling of fatigue may set in which makes them feel less productive.

This is typically the time of day when they may reach for a less healthy choice of food or beverage to “perk-up.”

Many of their snack options are laden with sugar and fat and have no nutritional value.  There are several healthy foods available that give us both a boost and essential nutrients.

Some healthy foods that have been proven to help raise energy levels are:

Bananas – Bananas contain carbohydrates, potassium and vitamin B6, all proven to boost energy levels in your body.

  • Sweet Potatoes – Sweet potatoes contain fiber and complex carbs, as well as manganese, which can help break down nutrients in order to produce energy.
  • Brown Rice – Brown Rice is less processed than white rice so it retains more fiber, vitamins and minerals. It also has a low glycemic index and could help regulate blood sugar levels to help maintain steady energy levels all day long.
  • Coffee – Coffee is rich in caffeine. Caffeine quickly passes from your bloodstream to your brain.  The result is the production of epinephrine.  Epinephrine is a hormone that stimulates the body and brain allowing you to keep more focused.
  • Eggs – Eggs are rich in protein and leucine. These are both known to stimulate energy.
  • Water – Not drinking enough water could cause dehydration which can cause your body functions to slow down and make you feel sluggish. It is a good habit to drink water throughout your day, even if you are not thirsty.
  • Dark Chocolate – Dark chocolate has a high content of cocoa. Cocoa has antioxidants that have proven health benefits, like increasing your blood flow.  An increased blood flow helps deliver oxygen to the brain and muscles, improving their functions.   Additionally, dark chocolate contains compounds such as caffeine, a known ingredient to enhance mental energy and mood.

If you’d like to speak with a Jamaica Hospital Medical Center licensed nutritionist, call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

For these and other healthy food and beverages that can give your day a boost, visit healthline.com.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

When is the Best Time to Get a Flu Vaccine ?

Flu season can start in September and run until May. Even before the summer is over, pharmacies start advertising that the flu vaccine is available. While many people believe that the best time to get a flu vaccine is as soon as possible, getting it in October probably is the best option. Some research has shown that the effects of the vaccine start to wear off after six months so we want to make sure we are well protected when the height of the flu season is upon us.

Every year the flu vaccine is different, manufactured with the hope that it will be effective against the prevalent strain expected for that year. It is estimated that it takes approximately two weeks for the vaccine to become fully effective, so being covered early is important. Everyone who is going to be vaccinated wants to be prepared before the peak of the flu season which runs from December to late March. If you would to schedule an appointment for a flu vaccine in the Ambulatory Care Center please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

SUGAR FREE LEMON POUND CAKE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being the wife of a diabetic, I see how difficult it is for my husband to pass up so many delicious, sugary desserts.

Below is a recipe that I have made myself and recommend highly.  Although I am not the creator of the recipe, I thought it delicious enough to share.

-Joann Ariola, Director of Intergovernmental Affairs, MediSys Health Network

INGREDIENTS:

1 (18.25 Ounce) Package Sugar-free Yellow Cake Mix
1 (3.4 Ounce) Sugar-free Lemon Pudding Mix
1¾ cups Water
3 Egg Whites
¾ cups Reduced-fat Milk
½ tsp Lemon Extract
1 (1 Ounce) Package Sugar-free Vanilla Pudding Mix
1 (ounce) Sugar-free Cool Whip
Cooking Spray

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and coat a 10×15-inch pan with cooking spray.

Combine yellow cake mix and lemon pudding mix in a large mixing bowl. Stir in water and egg whites. Beat mixture on low speed for 1 minute. Beat for an additional 4 minutes on high speed.

Place batter into prepared pan and bake for 30 minutes or until cooked through.

Meanwhile mix milk, lemon extract, and vanilla pudding mix in a large mixing bowl. Add in cool whip and mix well. Spread mixture over the cake once it has cooled.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.