BBQ Leftover Chicken Receipe

When you barbeque, you always seem to prepare more food than you need. Of course, this will leave you with leftovers more often than not. So what do you do with all that extra chicken?

If you are planning on finishing off your leftover chicken within a few days, wrap it tightly and keep it in the refrigerator. If you want to keep it for more than a few days, wrap the chicken in foil and seal it in a zip lock bag. Try to get as much air as possible out of the bag to preserve the leftovers for several months.

Take precaution when you are reheating your leftovers.  You do not have to reheat it on as low a temperature and slowly as you did the first time.  An oven temperature of around 325 degrees will work great. Do not overcook your chicken.  Overcooking can cause the chicken to become dry.

Properly reheated, your barbecued chicken should be just about as good as it was the day you first cooked it.

Now that we have discussed how to preserve your BBQ chicken, here’s a great way to reheat that chicken. Click the link below and follow the simple recipe that will take your leftover chicken and make it appear like an entirely different meal!

http://addapinch.com/cooking/bbq-chicken-bites-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Can Stroke Affect Young People Too

Stroke is usually thought of as something that happens to older people but an estimated 10% of stroke victims are under 45.

One study revealed that when a stroke occurs in younger individuals, the mortality rate is seven times higher than the general population. If a younger person has more than one stroke, their mortality rate increases to 17 times higher than the general population.

Risk factors include:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Elevated cholesterol
  • Intravenous drug addiction
  • High blood pressure

Unfortunately, because strokes are less common in younger people, diagnosis and treatment is delayed. Diagnosing a stroke is usually done with the aid of an MRI. Younger people who are diagnosed quickly tend to do well when treated early with medication that can break up a blood clot. It is important that this medication be administered within the first 4 ½ hours.

To identify a stroke it is important to remember the FAST acronym which stands for the signs and symptoms of a stroke

Facial drooping

Ability to raise arms is limited or absent

Slurred speech

Time – how much time it takes to summon help

There are a few factors that can help prevent a stroke. These include maintaining a proper weight, smoking cessation, getting regular exercise, having a diet low in saturated fats and high in fruits and vegetables, and avoiding alcoholic beverages.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to discuss your medical concerns, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Jo-Ann Campudoni

This month, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is proud to shine its Employee Spotlight on Jo-Ann Campudoni, Manager at TJH Medical Services, P.C.

Jo-Ann is a native of Queens, New York and grew up in Rockaway Beach, where she still resides to this day.

Jo-Ann graduated from Beach Channel High School in Rockaway and attended Andrews University in Michigan where she majored in Psychology. She has three amazing children of which she is very proud. She has a son who is currently serving in the Coast Guard, a daughter who is a Corporal in the Marines and a younger daughter who works as a customer service supervisor for FedEx. Jo-Ann comes from a very large family; she is the youngest of eight children. Her siblings live in various parts of the country and she wishes that they could see each other more frequently than they do.

Her philosophy on life is to get the most out of it as you can. She believes, “Life may not be perfect but you have to make it an adventure and go ever upward.” In her free time, she enjoys going to concerts, movies, reading books and meeting new people and learning about their experiences. Jo-Ann loves to dance and listen to music. She studied classical ballet, jazz, and contemporary dance. When she was in her teens she danced in the Alvin Ailey Dance Cadre. Her interest in music has brought her to hosting her own Internet radio show which can be found on social media outlets and gives her the opportunity to meet people in the musical world.

Jo-Ann believes in treating each patient with great respect and compassion. She feels that her experiences in life have taught her how much people appreciate being treated well. She enjoys working with her team at TJH because they work together so well. It is very much like a family in her department. Everyone works together to make the patient experience a good one. Jo-Ann looks forward to working with the team for a long time which is a goal we hope she achieves.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Could Smoking Be The Cause Of My Infertility?

The last week in April has been designated National Infertility Awareness Week (IVF). The observance is meant to bring awareness to the millions of Americans who are facing challenges when becoming pregnant; while removing any stigmas and barriers that remain in the way of having a child using IVF.

Some causes of infertility in women are issues with ovulation (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, sexually transmitted infections and unhealthy body weight. However, there have been multiple studies to support the theory that smoking has an adverse effect on fertility. Research has found that the prevalence of infertility is higher, and the time it takes to conceive is longer in smokers as compared to nonsmokers. It has also been proven that smoking can affect every stage of the reproductive process in both sexes because the chemicals in cigarettes can cause damage to both male sperm and female eggs.

In women, smoking can lead to many fertility problems, including:

  • Problems with the fallopian tubes, including blockages (preventing egg and sperm from meeting) and an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy.
  • Damage to the eggs as they develop in the ovaries.
  • Increased risk of miscarriage, possibly due to damaged eggs, damage to the developing fetus, or unfavorable changes in the uterine lining, which may make healthy implantation of an embryo less likely.

In addition, smoking can cause a woman’s eggs to age prematurely, leading to an earlier onset of menopause and a shorter window to conceive.

The good news is that the damage done to the female reproductive system as a result of smoking is reversible. Typically, after quitting smoking, your chance of natural fertility should become viable within a year or less.

If you want to have a baby, but you are a smoker, quit now! If you need help, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers smoking cessation services to help you. For more information, please call 718-206-8494.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You At Risk for Asthma?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 13 people has asthma. That translates to more than 26 million Americans.

Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow and swell, producing extra mucus resulting in difficulty breathing.

If this narrowing and swelling occurs and worsens, it may lead to an asthma attack.

Some tips to help you prevent asthma symptoms from occurring include:

  • Family history of asthma
  • Viral respiratory infections as a child
  • Allergies
  • Smoking
  • Air Pollution
  • Obesity

Some strategies you help prevent the symptoms of asthma are:

  • Stop smoking and avoid public places where cigarette smoking occurs
  • Avoid outdoor exposure on heavy smog days
  • Adopt a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein
  • Avoid allergens that trigger asthma attacks, such as pet dander, dust, mites, mold and pollen.

If you have recurrent coughing or wheezing that lasts more than a couple of days or any other signs or symptoms of asthma listed above, you should schedule an appointment to see your doctor since treating asthma early can help prevent long-term lung damace and reduce the likelihood of your asthma worsening over time.

If you would like to speak with a respiratory specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital First In Queens To Join HealingNYC’s Relay

The opioid epidemic continues to plague New York City communities.  According to the City’s Department of Health, there were 694 confirmed overdose deaths from January to June 2018, and a fatal drug overdose reported every six hours.

More New Yorkers die as a result of a drug overdose than homicides, suicides and motor vehicle accidents combined.

In Queens, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center which operates one of the City’s busiest emergency departments, has experienced firsthand the detriment the epidemic has caused.  Last year, Jamaica Hospital’s emergency department treated over 200 patients for opioid drug overdoses.

“Over the years, we have seen the numbers continue to increase significantly. This epidemic has profoundly affected many individuals and families. Opioid addiction has impacted all genders, ages, ethnicities and those of all socioeconomic backgrounds,” explained Dr. Geoffrey Doughlin, Chairman of Emergency Medicine.  “No group is untouched.”

“At Jamaica Hospital our goal is to improve the health of our community in all aspects. We are committed to doing all that we can to combat the opioid crisis,” shared Dr. Shi-Wen Lee, Vice Chairman of Emergency Medicine.  In addition to providing life-saving treatments in the emergency department, the hospital is the first in Queens to participate in New York City’s Relay program.

The Relay program, which was launched in 2017 under HealingNYC, targets survivors of opioid overdoses who are at high risk for a future, fatal overdose.  According to New York City’s Department of Health, “In the hours after someone survives an opioid overdose, a trained Relay “Wellness Advocate” meets with the survivor in the hospital emergency department to offer overdose risk reduction counseling, overdose rescue training, and an overdose prevention kit containing naloxone. Participating hospitals can contact Relay at any hour of the day or night, on every day of the year, and a Wellness Advocate aims to arrive within the hour. Wellness Advocates stay in contact with overdose survivors for up to 90 days and connect them to appropriate services”

“Jamaica Hospital is proud to work in collaboration with Relay. Since the program’s inception in August 2018 at this facility, our emergency department has made over 50 patient referrals,” said Joshua Sclair, Emergency Medicine Administrator.  The hospital’s participation in the initiative offers the community resources that can potentially reduce the number of overdose deaths and provide access to supportive services.

Any person in need of treatment for their addiction can come to the emergency department at Jamaica Hospital and receive help. The hospital has designated detoxification beds and staff that are specially trained to help patients with their treatment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a hernia ?

A hernia occurs when an organ or body part pushes through a weak spot in muscle or connective tissue into a part of the body that it isn’t supposed to be in. While some hernias can occur at birth, others may form later in life.  These types of hernias may occur as a result of heavy lifting, straining, pregnancy and obesity.

There are several types of hernias that include:

  • Inguinal hernias – Occurs when a part of the intestine pushes into the inguinal canal. Most commonly seen in males.
  • Femoral hernia -Occurs when the femoral artery and vein pass through the canal between the abdomen and the groin. Most often seen in females.
  • Epigastric hernia – Occurs when a small piece of fat protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscles  located between the belly button and the breastbone
  • Umbilical hernia – Occurs when a portion of the intestine pushes through the abdominal wall next to the belly button
  • Hiatal hernia – Occurs when the stomach pushes through the diaphragm into the chest and causes heartburn
  • Incisional hernia – Occurs when a portion of the intestine pushes through the abdominal wall where surgery had been performed previously

The symptoms of a hernia often depend on where it is located. Some hernias will cause pain while there are others that only have physical signs, such as a bulging out of the skin, but aren’t painful. When a portion of the intestine pushes through a muscle and becomes trapped it can be very painful block the intestinal blood supply. These hernias require urgent surgical attention. A hernia can be prevented by avoiding lifting heavy objects improperly, maintaining proper weigh, care when coughing, having a diet that contains adequate fiber, and avoiding excessive straining during a bowel movement.

Treatment for a hernia depends on its location, size and the amount of discomfort. In some cases surgery isn’t necessary and the hernia can be pushed into place and held there by a device called a truss. Surgical options include closing the weak spot in the muscle with stitches, , using a mesh to reinforce the weak muscle that the hernia is pushing through, and laparoscopic surgery to repair the defect that is causing the hernia.

If you are experiencing any discomfort from a hernia, it is important to seek professional help to learn what the options are to repair it. You can schedule an appointment with a surgeon at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Awaiting the arrival of your child or becoming a mother should be a time of great hope and happy anticipation, but for some, it can bring a wave of depression and anxiety. If you are experiencing depression and anxiety that occurred during or within one year after your pregnancy, you may have Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD).

GAD is usually prevalent in those who have a history of depression, anxiety or substance abuse, a family history of mental illness, lack of a good support system, issues with a previous pregnancy or schedule and hormonal changes.

Some common signs of GAD are:

  • Feeling sad, depressed, and/or crying a lot
  • Diminished interest in becoming a mother
  • Feeling worthless or guilty, especially about not being a good mother
  • Strong anxiety, tension, and/or fear either about your future child or other things
  • Sleep problems
  • Thoughts of wanting to be dead or wanting to kill yourself
  • Having low energy
  • Loss of or increase in appetite or weight
  • Trouble focusing, remembering things, or making decisions
  • Feeling restless or irritable
  • Having headaches, chest pains, heart palpitations, numbness, or hyperventilation

Often times the new mom may experience disbelief, embarrassment, shame or guilt with GAD before seeking treatment to manage the disorder.  Successful management of GAD can be done through medication and/or therapy.

If you are expecting a baby or have just become a mom and are feeling any of the symptoms listed above, you can make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Mental Health for a screening.

To make an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foods that are Suprisingly High in Sugar

As our lifestyles move toward healthier eating habits, it is not enough to just count calories, carbohydrates or proteins; we should also be checking how much sugar is in the “healthy” foods we are eating.

Fruit, for example, although healthy for you, can be high in sugar.  A pineapple has 16 grams of sugar per slice, there are 17 grams per of sugar in one large banana and a small apple has a whopping 19 grams of sugar.  Although all are healthy, you have to be what you eat; especially, if you are a diabetic.

Some other “healthy” foods that are surprisingly high in sugar are:

  • Lo-fat yogurt
  • Fruit juice
  • Sport drinks
  • Chocolate milk
  • Granola
  • Protein bars
  • Salad dressing
  • Smoothies
  • Non-dairy milk

The American Heart Association recommends that women limited their added sugar intake to six teaspoons per day, while men should limit their intake to nine teaspoons.

It is a known fact that ingesting too much sugar is not good for your overall health.  If your sugar intake is more than the recommended daily dosage, you may be at risk for obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

If you are concerned about your sugar intake and would like to speak with a Registered Dietitian at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is My Wellness Routine Causing Me Stress?

Did you ever notice when you turn on the TV, radio, read a magazine or listen to a podcast, the topic being discussed is how boosting your wellness routine will reduce your stress? But, what if your wellness routine is what is causing your stress?

Experts will tell you that there is a fine line between positive self-care and over reaching your wellness goals, causing the activation of the very anxiety based triggers you are seeking to quell.  Some of the routines you may have adopted to make you feel better can often be another stressful thing in your already jam packed lifestyle.  If this is the case, it is time for a change.

Some ways to determine if your wellness routine is a cause of stress are:

  • Feeling overwhelmed – If your morning routine is cutting into your responsibilities, try to accommodate a different start time when your home is quieter and time can be spent focusing on yourself.
  • Not feeling the benefit – If your wellness routine isn’t helping you achieve your goals, you may want to tweak it a bit and change the activity. If your spin class isn’t helping you, switch to yoga or a brisk walk.
  • Routine rut – Like anything else, sometimes our wellness routine can get a bit boring. Add some fun to your existing routine by partnering up with friends.  Adding a bit of laughter to your daily routine
  • Your wellness routine has to be realistic. It has to become every facet of your day slowly working to transform you into the best version of yourself.
  • Your wellness routine has to be realistic. It has to become every facet of your day slowly working to transform you into the best version of yourself.

Your wellness routine has to be realistic.  It has to become part of every facet of your day, slowly working to transform you into the best version of yourself. Be honest with yourself and simplify your routine so that you can reset your priorities and avoid burnout.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.