Heat Stroke vs. Heat Exhaustion

With the mercury rising, you have to think about what you can do to keep cool.  Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are common maladies during the summer months. The main symptoms of both heat stroke and heat exhaustion are an altered mental state or behavior, nausea, vomiting, flushed skin, rapid breathing, and a racing heart rate.  The main difference is, when you are experiencing heat exhaustion you will experience profuse sweating.  Conversely, when you are experiencing heat stroke, there will be a lack of sweat.

The best way to combat heat stroke and heat exhaustion is by hydrating with cool water when it is hot and humid; this will help you stay clear of dehydration. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends drinking 16 – 20 ounces of water before moderate intensity summer exercise (8 – 12 ounces of water 10 – 15 minutes before going out into the heat and 3 – 8 ounces every 15 – 20 minutes during activity when active for less than one hour).

Some the most common signs of dehydration are:

  • General  fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Increased body temperature
  • Weakness
  • Muscle cramps

Other means of keeping cool during the summer months is to wear lighter, breathable fabrics, slow down your pace, exercise indoors, and by using common sense when planning your day outdoors.

Please speak with your physician to determine your specific needs to avoid dehydration since it can vary from person to person.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Information About Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic Brain Injury is a very serious public health issue in the United States. A Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is categorized into two major types of injuries: Penetrating Injuries and Closed Head Injuries. Penetrating injuries occur when a foreign object (e.g., a bullet) enters the brain and causes damage to specific brain parts. Closed Head Injuries result from a blow to the head as occurs, for example, in a car accident when the head strikes the windshield or dashboard.

Between 2002 and 2011, the number of children making trips to emergency rooms for brain injuries increased by 92 percent. During the same time, the number of those admitted to the hospital for further observation or treatment also increased by about 10 percent.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has called traumatic brain injury an “invisible epidemic,” because unlike other injuries, such as broken bones, the symptoms are not always immediately identifiable. According to the CDC, almost 500,000 emergency room visits for traumatic brain injuries each year are made by children under the age of 14. And each year, emergency rooms nationwide treat nearly 175,000 sports-related traumatic brain injuries among children under the age of 19.

With March being Brain Injury Awareness Month, The Jamaica Hospital Department of Surgery Trauma Division wants to make sure you and your loved ones recognize traumatic brain injuries in children.

Call 9-1-1 or take the child to the emergency department right away if after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body the child exhibits one or more of the following danger signs:

  • One pupil larger than the other
  • Is drowsy or cannot be awakened
  • A headache that gets worse
  • Weakness, numbness, or decreased coordination
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Slurred speech
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • Cannot recognize people or places
  • Becomes increasingly confused, restless

The following are some tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Brain Injury Association of America to reduce the chances that you or your family members will have a brain injury:

  • Always buckle your child into a child safety seat, booster seat, or seat belt (according to the child’s height, weight, and age) in the car.
  • Make sure your children wear helmets when riding a bike, scooter, or playing a contact sport, such as football, baseball or ice hockey.
  • Avoid falls in the home by: Installing window guards to keep young children from falling out of open windows. Using safety gates at the top and bottom of stairs when young children are around. Using non-slip mats in the bathtub and on shower floors;

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fruit and Vegetable Safety

I bet your doctor has talked to you at some point in your life about how important it is for your health to eat fruits and vegetables; they can help prevent stroke and heart disease, help you lose weight and even help to protect against certain types of cancer.  But one thing they probably didn’t mention is how important it is to pick and prepare fruits and vegetables properly to prevent food poisoning that can be caused by germs on your fresh produce.

This process all starts at the grocery store or market:

  • It is very important to choose produce that hasn’t been bruised or damaged. This creates an area where potentially harmful germs can grow.
  • Once you have your produce, keep it separated from raw meats in your cart, bags and refrigerator.
  • Make sure to keep pre-cut fruits and vegetables cold or refrigerated. They are less likely to grow harmful germs when kept cold.
  • Don’t be fooled! Read packages carefully as pre-packaged does not always mean pre-washed. There is still a risk of contamination.

Once you’re home, it’s important to:

  • Wash everything that will come into contact with your produce while you’re cooking; including your hands, cooking surfaces, utensils, and the produce itself. It is best to wash your fruits and vegetables under running water.
  • Make sure to remove any bruised or damaged areas of the produce.
  • Store all cut or peeled fruits and vegetables properly. They should be refrigerated within two hours of preparation if they are not going to be cooked.

Certain people have a greater chance of getting food poisoning and it is especially important to be careful when preparing food for them. Those people are the very young, adults older than 65 years old, pregnant women, or anyone with a weakened immune system.

Although most cases of food poisoning are mild, only lasting a few days, there are some more severe forms.  If you experience vomiting or diarrhea for more than three days, have a high fever greater than 101F, or see blood in your stool, you should talk to your doctor immediately.

With a little bit of new knowledge and care, you can protect yourself, enjoy a healthier diet and live a healthier life. Just remember to buy right, store properly, separate for safety and prepare safely.

For more information about current outbreaks of food poisoning related to food products, visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/features/foodsafetyquiz/

To schedule an appointment with a Family Medicine Physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call

Dr. Andrew Flowers, Family Medicine

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Provides New and Effective Way to Treat Prostate Gland Enlargement

Dr. Ricardo Ricciardi is one of the first Urologists in New York City to be recognized for his efforts in providing a new and effective way to treat Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that affects millions of men in the United States.

BPH — also called prostate gland enlargement — is a common condition that many men experience as they get older.  The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that surrounds the urethra. When the prostate becomes enlarged it can lead to BPH, which can cause uncomfortable urinary symptoms, such as frequent or urgent need to urinate and increased frequency of urination at night. In addition to urinary problems, men living with BPH also experience interrupted sleep, loss of productivity, and depression.  Over 40 million men in America are affected by BPH and 12 million are currently under the care of a physician for the condition.

Until recently, men living with BPH were offered two treatment options – medication or surgery. Medication is often the first-line of therapy for BPH, but relief can be inadequate and temporary. In addition, many men have reported various side effects including sexual dysfunction, dizziness and headaches.  Traditionally, the alternative treatment option has been surgery, but surgical options either require cutting, heating or removing prostate tissue to open the blocked urethra. While surgery has been effective in relieving symptoms, it requires a longer recovery period and can also leave patients with permanent side effects such as urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and retrograde ejaculation.

Now, Dr. Ricciardi is offering the UroLift system, an FDA cleared, revolutionary treatment that provides rapid and durable relief from urinary symptoms associated with BPH. The UroLift system works by placing small, permanent implants into the prostate to lift and hold the enlarged tissue out of the way, relieving pressure on the urethra and allowing urine to flow. There is no cutting, heating, or removal of prostate tissue. This non-invasive procedure is done in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. Patients experience rapid improvement with minimal side effects and are able to resume their normal routines quickly and no longer require medication.

According to Dr. Ricciardi, “I am privileged to be able to offer my patients the UroLift procedure, which is truly a breakthrough in the treatment of BPH. This procedure provides so many benefits and can increase their overall quality of life without any side effects.”

Dr. Ricciardi has performed over 100 UroLift procedures and his practice has recently been named as a Center of Excellence in this form of treatment. This designation recognizes that Dr. Ricciardi has achieved the highest level of training with the UroLift System and has demonstrated a commitment to providing exemplary care to men suffering from symptoms of BPH.  Less than 70 urologists in the United States have received a Center of Excellence designation and Dr. Ricciardi is the only physician in New York City to receive this honor.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Ricciardi, please call  (718) 206-7110.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Receives Patient Safety Award and Ranks in Top 10% in Nation for Patient Safety

If you are sick and need to go to the hospital, it is important to know that if admitted, your hospital is dedicated to safety, and has a proven track record of preventing further illness and injury to its patients.

Healthgrades, a trusted provider of information to millions of health care consumers across the United States, recently recognized the best-performing hospitals in the country and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center received the Patient Safety Excellence Award, an accolade that recognizes hospitals that lead in the prevention of patient safety events.

This prestigious honor highlights the hospital’s performance in safeguarding patients from serious, potentially preventable complications during their hospital stay.  Jamaica Hospital, part of the MediSys Health Network ranked in the top 10% in the nation for patient safety.

To determine which hospitals receive the Patient Safety Excellence Award, Healthgrades reviews the results of 14 key patient safety indicators submitted by hospitals to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Some of the safety measures surveyed include pressure ulcers, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and postoperative sepsis rates.

Jamaica is one of two hospitals in Queens and one of only four in New York City to receive this honor. The hospital attributes their vastly improved safety rates to robust quality improvement policies and programs that were initiated over a decade ago and that are still being followed and improved upon every day.

According to MediSys Health Network President, Bruce J. Flanz, “Patient Safety is one of the top priorities at Jamaica Hospital. We are proud to be in a position to provide our patients with a safe and trusted environment to receive high-quality care. I would like to thank the many members of our staff who are committed to this effort.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Today is National HIV Testing Day

June 27th is National HIV Testing Day. There are 1.1 million people living with HIV in the United States, and one in seven are unaware they have the virus.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, along with other health organizations is working together to raise awareness about the importance of getting tested and early HIV diagnosis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends “that everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine health care.”

We are encouraging people to know their status. There are now more ways than ever to get tested.

Jamaica Hospital’s clinics offer HIV testing to the community. For a list of our clinics and contact information, please visit https://jamaicahospital.org/clinical-services/ambulatory-care/

If a patient tests positive we also provide HIV counseling and treatment. We offer integrated clinical care, social and educational services in a comfortable and caring environment.

To receive more information about National HIV Testing Day and to learn more about the virus, please visit, https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/library/awareness/testingday.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s First Farmers’ Market

As part of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s (JHMC) effort to provide out community with healthy nutrition and wellness alternatives, we are proud to announce our first Farmers’ Market!  JHMC has partnered with the LI Greenmarket and the Cornell University Cooperative Extension to bring fresh produce and wellness programs for everyone to enjoy!

The Farmers’ Market will be open every Wednesday, 10:00AM – 4:00PM, from June 27, 2018 through November 21, 2018.  The Market will be located at 134-20 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11418.

Remember, fresh is best!

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

EGGPLANT TOMATO SALAD

Served as the main dish or a tasty side, this nutritious and delicious Eggplant Tomato Salad will astonish the most finicky palate.

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s all you need to get started!

Ingredients:

  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 1 large red bell pepper
  • 7 tomatoes
  • 1 eggplant
  • 4 cloves crushed garlic
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper

Directions:

  1. Roast peppers on stove burners or under oven broiler until skin turns evenly black. Immediately place in a plastic bag and let cool.
  2. Prepare the tomatoes by cutting an X on the bottom of each and boil in water for 1 minute, plunge into a cold water bath and let cool.
  3. Cut the eggplant into small strips and sauté in oil until eggplant begins to brown. About 6 to 8 minutes.  Once the eggplant is soft, add garlic.
  4. Rinse the peppers under cold water and remove the burnt skin (just the ash). Open the peppers and remove seeds.  Cut into small strips and add to eggplant.  Peel cooled tomatoes, chop and add to eggplant mixture.  Add tomato paste, salt pepper and cayenne.  Bring to boil, reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.

This is a great recipe for an “on the go” lifestyle because it requires short prep and cooking times.  In an hour and 20 min, you will have your meal on the table.

As part of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s (JHMC) effort to provide out community with healthy nutrition and wellness alternatives, we are proud to announce our first Farmers’ Market!  JHMC has partnered with the LI Greenmarket and the Cornell University Cooperative Extension to bring fresh produce and wellness programs for everyone to enjoy!

The Farmers’ Market will be open every Wednesday, 10:00AM – 4:00PM, from June 27, 2018 through November 21, 2018.  The Market will be located at 134-20 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11418.

Remember, fresh is best!

For this and more healthy vegetable recipes visit – https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/14336/eggplant-tomato-salad/

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Victoria Lampado, LMSW

This month we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Victoria Lampado, LMSW. Victoria is a member of our Social Work Department who has been working at Jamaica Hospital for over three years. She is a native New Yorker, having grown up in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn and now residing in Kew Gardens, Queens. Victoria is a graduate of Bishop Ford High School, Brooklyn College and Columbia University where she obtained her Masters in Social Work.
Victoria was influenced by her Italian and Russian heritage which gave her a deep appreciation of the fine arts, Broadway theater and music.  She grew up listening to Italian operas, and popular singers like Frank Sinatra, Doris Day and Judy Garland thanks to the influence of her father who shared his love of everything Italian with his family. In her free time, Victoria enjoys cooking, especially Italian food, crocheting, and spending time with her family and friends. She is very proud of her late father who was a World War II veteran who instilled in her a sense of compassion and caring for those who are less fortunate. She also has a rescue dog, a Shitzu named Goldie, who she has given a good home to.
Before coming to Jamaica Hospital Victoria worked as a social worker in a wide range of professional settings. There are several reasons why she gives for enjoying working at Jamaica Hospital more than anyplace she has worked previously. She enjoys the international diversity of both the patients we treat, and the people who work here. Victoria feels that though there are challenges with the population we work with, the entire team comes together to meet them and find ways to accomplish their goals. Every patient is treated with respect and dignity and the number one goal is to always do the right thing for the patient. “Jamaica Hospital has great energy and great people who care about our patients” she states. She also pointed out that prior to coming to work at Jamaica Hospital, she herself had been a patient at the hospital on two occasions and she was very impressed with the excellent level of care she received.
Victoria hopes that the work she is doing will have a positive impact on people’s lives and we think she is already well on her way to accomplishing that goal.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Eating Breakfast Important for my Child?

Let’s start with a question on this #WellnessWednesday.  What did your child have for breakfast this morning?

If the answer is “nothing” you may want to read on.

Nutritional experts have concluded that children who leave the house without eating a balanced breakfast are more apt to be tired, irritable and fidgety.  Conversely, nutritional experts have found that when your child eats breakfast, regularly, there is a marked improvement in their energy, attitude, general health and test score performance.

Some tips to help you to incorporate breakfast into your child’s morning routine are:

  • Prepare clothing, books, and school supplies the night before to leave more time in the morning for breakfast
  • Set the alarm for 15 minutes earlier
  • Choose foods that require little preparation such as fresh fruits, milk, yogurt, cheese, eggs, whole grain cereals or hot oatmeal
  • For children with slight appetites, offer a fruit smoothie or breakfast bar

Probably the best way to get your children to eat breakfast is to be a good role model.  As adults, we can be very busy and may sacrifice our own breakfast in the morning.  Sit down and join your child for a good first meal of the day.  By doing so, you will show them the value of eating breakfast.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.