Poison Prevention Week- Child Safety Tips

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Social Anxiety Disorder

Mental Health Clinic Queens Social anxiety disorder or social phobia is a common type of anxiety disorder that affects approximately 15 million adults living in the United States.  According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, it is characterized by “an intense anxiety or fear of being judged, negatively evaluated, or rejected in a social or performance situation.”

There is no exact known cause for social anxiety disorder; although, it is believed that genetics play a significant role.  Social phobia is also linked to having an overactive amygdala; the part of the brain that controls our response to fear.  Others factors believed to contribute to the disorder are a history of abuse or bullying.

The onset of social anxiety disorder typically begins in the early to mid –teens; however, it can also occur in young children and adults.

Those with social anxiety disorder often experience physical symptoms associated with fear or anxiety in social situations. These symptoms may include rapid heart rate, dizziness, muscle tension, sweating or nausea.

Symptoms of social anxiety disorder can profoundly affect an individual’s ability to live a normal life.  Those affected often avoid or have trouble with normal, day-to-day social situations such as making eye contact, entering rooms where there are people, using public restrooms, eating in front of people or going to work or school.

These behaviors are often indicative of a more serious problem that could be developing as a result of social anxiety disorder. If left unaddressed, social phobia can lead to low self-esteem, negative thoughts, depression, substance abuse or suicide.

The best approach to treating social anxiety disorder is to receive assistance from a mental health professional.  They will be able to assess your health to determine whether you have a social anxiety disorder or other mental health conditions.  As part of your treatment, a mental health professional may recommend psychotherapy or medications.  They may also suggest implementing lifestyle changes such as exercising, learning stress reduction skills or participating in support groups.

To make an appointment or to speak with a mental health provider at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5575.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hidden Illnesses

Ten percent of people living in the United States have a medical condition that can be characterized as an invisible or hidden disability.

Hidden disabilities may not be visible on the outside or immediately apparent; however, their symptoms can be physically and mentally limiting (impairing individuals from leading a normal life). These limitations are often the result of chronic hidden illnesses such as:

  • Lupus- A chronic autoimmune disease that can cause the body’s immune system to attack healthy tissue. Symptoms include damage and swelling of the skin, joints, kidneys, heart and lungs.
  • Cystic fibrosis – A progressive and chronic genetic order that causes persistent lung infections. Symptoms include salty-tasting skin, frequent lung infections, shortness of breath, persistent coughing, greasy or bulky stool.
  • Chronic fatigue- A debilitating disorder characterized by extreme fatigue or tiredness that does not go away with rest. Symptoms include chronic insomnia, frequent headaches, loss of concentration or memory, muscle pain or swollen lymph nodes.
  • Lyme disease – An inflammatory disease caused by bacteria that are transmitted by the bite of an infected black-legged tick. Symptoms include rashes, severe headaches, inflammation of the brain or spinal cord.
  • Fibromyalgia – A chronic pain disorder characterized by widespread pain in the muscles and bones.  Symptoms include severe pain, fatigue or difficulty concentrating.

Living with a hidden disability or hidden illness can be difficult because those diagnosed are often met with skepticism due to a lack of knowledge.  Another challenge that a person living with this type of illness or disability may encounter is social isolation.

There are a few things that can be done to overcome these challenges such as educating loved ones and others about your disability, inviting loved ones to your medical appointments or joining a support group.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital First In Queens To Join HealingNYC’s Relay

The opioid epidemic continues to plague New York City communities.  According to the City’s Department of Health, there were 694 confirmed overdose deaths from January to June 2018, and a fatal drug overdose reported every six hours.

More New Yorkers die as a result of a drug overdose than homicides, suicides and motor vehicle accidents combined.

In Queens, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center which operates one of the City’s busiest emergency departments, has experienced firsthand the detriment the epidemic has caused.  Last year, Jamaica Hospital’s emergency department treated over 200 patients for opioid drug overdoses.

“Over the years, we have seen the numbers continue to increase significantly. This epidemic has profoundly affected many individuals and families. Opioid addiction has impacted all genders, ages, ethnicities and those of all socioeconomic backgrounds,” explained Dr. Geoffrey Doughlin, Chairman of Emergency Medicine.  “No group is untouched.”

“At Jamaica Hospital our goal is to improve the health of our community in all aspects. We are committed to doing all that we can to combat the opioid crisis,” shared Dr. Shi-Wen Lee, Vice Chairman of Emergency Medicine.  In addition to providing life-saving treatments in the emergency department, the hospital is the first in Queens to participate in New York City’s Relay program.

The Relay program, which was launched in 2017 under HealingNYC, targets survivors of opioid overdoses who are at high risk for a future, fatal overdose.  According to New York City’s Department of Health, “In the hours after someone survives an opioid overdose, a trained Relay “Wellness Advocate” meets with the survivor in the hospital emergency department to offer overdose risk reduction counseling, overdose rescue training, and an overdose prevention kit containing naloxone. Participating hospitals can contact Relay at any hour of the day or night, on every day of the year, and a Wellness Advocate aims to arrive within the hour. Wellness Advocates stay in contact with overdose survivors for up to 90 days and connect them to appropriate services”

“Jamaica Hospital is proud to work in collaboration with Relay. Since the program’s inception in August 2018 at this facility, our emergency department has made over 50 patient referrals,” said Joshua Sclair, Emergency Medicine Administrator.  The hospital’s participation in the initiative offers the community resources that can potentially reduce the number of overdose deaths and provide access to supportive services.

Any person in need of treatment for their addiction can come to the emergency department at Jamaica Hospital and receive help. The hospital has designated detoxification beds and staff that are specially trained to help patients with their treatment.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Adenovirus Infections

Adenoviruses are a group of viruses that can infect the lining of the eyes, respiratory tract, intestines, urinary tract and nervous system.  Infections often result in common illnesses such as bronchitis, pink eye, diarrhea, sore throat, bladder infections or pneumonia.

Adenoviruses are highly contagious and can be spread when someone who is infected sneezes or coughs. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), adenoviruses can also spread through close personal contact (touching or shaking hands) or by “touching surfaces with the adenoviruses on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands.”  There have been cases in which adenoviruses have spread through stool or through water (for example swimming pools) but occurrences are uncommon.

The places in which adenoviruses are commonly found are daycare centers, summer camps, schools or other areas where large groups of children gather.

Anyone is at risk for contracting adenoviruses, but young children and individuals with compromised immune systems are more susceptible to infection than others.  Symptoms of infection depend on the type of illness a person develops. They may include:

  • Fever
  • Coughing
  • Loose stools
  • Pain
  • Chills
  • Burning during urination

It is highly advised that medical attention is sought if symptoms persist for an extended period of time, and immediately received if they are accompanied by trouble breathing, signs of dehydration or swelling around the eyes.

There is no specific treatment for adenovirus infections; however, the risk of transmission can be reduced by taking preventative measures such as hand washing, avoiding contact with your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands, staying home when sick, covering your nose and mouth when sneezing or coughing and avoiding personal contact. The CDC also advises, that you “keep adequate levels of chlorine in swimming pools to prevent outbreaks of conjunctivitis caused by adenoviruses.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

PCOS

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common hormonal disorder that occurs in women of reproductive age. It affects 1 in every 10 women living in the United States.

The exact cause of PCOS is unknown; however, several factors are believed to contribute to the disorder. Factors that may play a role in the development of PCOS are genetics, low-grade inflammation or producing excessive amounts of androgens (male hormones) or insulin.

Those affected by PCOS often develop hormonal imbalance and metabolism problems, which can lead to symptoms such as:

  • Acne
  • Hirsutism ( Excessive hair on the face or in areas where only men normally have hair)
  • Irregular menstrual cycles
  • Weight gain or weight loss
  • Thinning hair (Male pattern baldness)
  • Skin tags
  • Darkening of skin (Especially in areas such as the groin, underneath the breast and neck creases)

PCOS is linked to other health problems.  Women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome are at risk of complications such as:

  • Diabetes
  • Infertility
  • Miscarriage or premature birth
  • Endometrial cancer
  • Depression and anxiety
  • High blood pressure
  • Sleep apnea

There is no single test used to diagnose PCOS.  Your doctor may take into consideration your medical history and recommend blood tests, pelvic examinations or ultrasounds to rule out other causes for symptoms.

Treatment for PCOS is focused on managing complications.  Your doctor may recommend lifestyle changes, medication or cosmetic procedures to improve symptoms.

To schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call  718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mistakes That Can Affect Your Blood Pressure Reading

Measuring your blood pressure at home is a very important part of properly managing hypertension.  Therefore taking accurate measurements is crucial.

To ensure accuracy, there are several things you should and should not do while measuring, as they can affect your reading.  Here are a few:

  • Always use the bathroom before measuring- Having a full bladder can add points to your reading.
  • Remain quiet- Talking while checking your blood pressure can cause deviations in measurements.
  • While seated make sure your back is supported and both your feet are placed flat on the ground-Measuring blood pressure in a posture where your back or feet are not supported can affect readings.
  • Keep your arm leveled with your heart- If your arm is not on the same level as your heart while getting a reading, you run the risk of getting measurements that are higher than your actual blood pressure level. Always make certain your arm is supported, you can rest it on a chair arm, table or desk to receive the best positioning.
  • Do not place the blood pressure cuff over clothing – Studies show that doing so can have an impact on systolic blood pressure. Your cuff should be placed on your bare arm during measurements.
  • Do not eat or drink anything 30 minutes before taking your blood pressure- Consuming food or drinking beverages within that time can result in a reading that may be inaccurate and high.

Improperly measuring your blood pressure can have serious consequences.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “A reading that underestimates your blood pressure might give you a false sense of security about your health. But a reading that overestimates your blood pressure might lead to treatment you don’t really need.”

In addition to following best practices for an accurate blood pressure reading, it is important that you keep track of your numbers. You can use a notebook, app or chart to do so.  If you are concerned about changes in your blood pressure readings, contact your doctor right away.

To speak with a doctor, or schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Don’t Ignore The Signs of A Ministroke

Ministroke also known as a transient ischemic attack (TIA) occurs when there is a temporary interruption of blood flow to part of the brain.

The symptoms of a ministroke are sometimes ignored because they typically last only for a few minutes (in some instances up to 24 hours), and may mimic symptoms of migraines, low blood sugar or seizures.

Although the symptoms of a ministroke generally do not cause permanent damage, they must not be dismissed. One in three people who have a ministroke are at risk of having a major stroke within a year; therefore, it is important to pay attention to the warning signs.  Signs and symptoms of TIA include:

  • Numbness or weakness of the face, legs or arms (especially on one side of the body)
  • Dizziness or loss of balance
  • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden headache
  • Slurred speech or difficulty understanding others

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, it is important that you seek immediate medical attention. Prompt treatment can reduce your risk of having a major stroke.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pregnancy Myths

Ob/Gyn queens, gynecologist queens Learning that you are pregnant can be one of the most exciting times in a woman’s life.  After receiving the great news, you are likely to go on a quest for information that will help you to have a healthy pregnancy.

During your search for information, you may encounter a lot of helpful facts and just as many myths. To help you to separate fact from fiction, here are a few common myths debunked:

  • You cannot dye your hair- There is no data that supports the harmful effects of dying your hair during pregnancy.
  • You are eating for two- Most women will only need to consume 200 extra calories each day during their pregnancy. There is no need to consume an excessive amount of calories.
  • You should not exercise- Exercise is encouraged throughout your pregnancy. However, as your pregnancy advances, some types of exercise can be harmful. Consult with your doctor to determine a workout routine that is safe for your health.
  • You can drink a little while pregnant – No amount of alcohol consumption is safe during pregnancy. It is best to completely avoid drinking alcoholic beverages.
  • You should avoid vaccinations- It is highly recommended that you receive the vaccinations needed to keep you and your developing baby healthy. One vaccination that is highly recommended is the whooping cough vaccine; it protects your baby from developing pertussis.

If you have questions or concerns about your pregnancy, your Ob/Gyn is a great source of information.   Your doctor can advise you about exercise, diet, medications and other factors of your health. To schedule an appointment with an Ob/Gyn at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why STD Rates Are Rising

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sexually transmitted disease (STD) rates in the United States continue to rise at a pace that concerns health officials. Data gathered from 2013 to 2017 indicate that STD rates have increased greatly over the four year period.

In the United States, nearly 2.3 million cases of gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis were diagnosed in 2017. Studies show that these numbers have surpassed previous records set in 2016 by more than 200,000 cases.  CDC reports show that from 2013 to 2017, gonorrhea diagnoses increased by 67%; primary and secondary syphilis diagnoses increased by 76% and chlamydia 22%.

Health officials are most concerned about these sharp increases because chlamydia, syphilis and gonorrhea are all diseases that were once nearly eliminated or widely controlled but now have resurged.

Several factors have contributed to the resurgence of these diseases.  There has been a rise in risky sexual practices such as sex without condoms.  Studies show this may be the result of a reduced fear of getting pregnant and less fear of the risks associated with unprotected sex.  Other factors believed to be contributors to the escalation of STD rates include:

  • The rise of certain dating apps which have made casual sexual encounters more readily available and anonymous.
  • STDs spreading in populations that were not traditionally affected. The CDC reports that more and more women are being diagnosed with syphilis and some have passed the disease on to their babies. The agency states that in 2016, “there was a 36 percent increase in rates of syphilis among women and a 28 percent increase in syphilis among newborns.”
  • A lack of education and resources to combat these new challenges. According to the CDC, there isn’t enough funding available for STD clinics or programs to provide effective prevention education and healthcare.

There is still a stigma attached to STDs and people may be reluctant to speak to their doctor about screening and treatment.  However, it is important to keep in mind that your doctor is professionally trained to assist you or provide treatment.  If you are sexually active and believe you may be at risk of exposure to STDs, it is important that you get screened regularly.  Leaving certain STDs untreated can lead to complications such as infertility, stillbirth in infants, an increased risk of HIV infection, pelvic inflammatory disease and certain cancers.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.