National Back Pack Safety Month

September is National School Backpack Safety Month and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is sharing information on how you can help your child avoid the pain and injury that is associated with carrying heavy backpacks.  These simple tips can help protect your child from having chronic back pain throughout their lives.

Backpacks are essential back-to- school items for kids.  They come in different colors, sizes and shapes and most importantly they help children to carry their belongings.  Backpacks are preferred by many in comparison to shoulder bags because when worn correctly, they evenly distribute weight across the body.  However, if worn incorrectly they can cause back pain or injuries and eventually lead to poor posture.

To prevent problems associated with improper backpack use, parents should first purchase a backpack that has the following features:

  • Lightweight
  • Wide and padded straps
  • Multiple compartments
  • Padded back
  • Waist belt
  • Correct size (A backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso).

Practicing these safety tips will further reduce the chance of back pain or injuries caused by backpacks:

  • When packing, heavier items should be placed to the back and center of the backpack. Lighter items should be in front. Sharp objects such as scissors or pencils should be kept away from your child’s back.  Utilizing different compartments can help in distributing weight.
  • Do not over pack. Doctors recommend that children should not carry backpacks that weigh more than 10-15% of their body weight.
  • Ensure that children use both straps. Using a single strap can cause muscle strain.
  • Adjust the straps so that the backpack fits closely to your child’s back and sits two inches above the waist. This ensures comfort and proper weight distribution.
  • Encourage children to use their lockers or desks throughout the day to drop off heavy books.

The Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America recommends that parents should always look for warning signs that indicate backpacks may be too heavy. If your child struggles to put on and take off the backpack, they are complaining of numbness or tingling or if there are red strap marks on their shoulders -It may be time for you to lighten their load.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Suicide Prevention Week

Suicide affects millions; over 800,000 people take their lives each year, and the number of people who attempt suicide is twenty five times that amount. In addition to the lives lost, suicide also affects the many friends and family members devastated by the loss of their loved one.

Suicide is largely preventable though. Through education and awareness, we can get those people who are contemplating suicide the help they need.

One of the best tools in preventing suicide is to know the risk factors. Over 90% of people who attempt suicide live with depression or another mental disorder. Alcohol or substance abuse is often a contributing factor. Adverse factions to traumatic events or stress can also lead to someone wanting to take their own life.Other risk factors for suicide include:

• Family history of mental disorder or substance abuse
• Family history of suicide
• Family violence
• Physical or sexual abuse
• Keeping firearms in the home
• Chronic physical illness, including chronic pain
• Exposure to the suicidal behavior of others

Someone who is considering suicide usually displays certain behaviors. Loved ones should look for the following warning signs:

Always talking or thinking about death
Trouble sleeping and eating — that gets worse over time
Displaying reckless behavior that could result in death, such as driving fast or running red lights
Losing interest in things one used to care about
Making comments about being hopeless, helpless, or worthless
Talking about suicide or killing one’s self
Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

If someone you know appears to be contemplating suicide, take the issue seriously. Let the person know that you care and understand and are listening and attempt to get them immediate help from a health care professional.

If your loved one appears to be in imminent danger of committing suicide, do not leave him or her alone. Remove any weapons or drugs he or she could use. Accompany him or her to the nearest emergency room or call 911.

The week of Sept. 10th has been designated World Suicide Prevention Week. Many organizations from around the world have joined this cause. Jamaica Hospital’s supports their efforts and the hospital’s Department of Psychiatry offers many inpatient and outpatient services to help those in need.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sickle Cell Awareness Month

September has been designated National Sickle Cell Awareness Month to bring attention to this genetic disease that affects an estimated 100,000 Americans.

Sickle cell disease is an inherited form of anemia – a condition in which red blood cells are unable to carry oxygen throughout the body. For most, red blood cells are round and can move easily through blood vessels, but the red blood cells in people with sickle cell disease are crescent, or half-moon shaped. These irregular shaped cells can get stuck in blood vessels, which can slow or block the flow of oxygen to certain parts of the body.

In addition to being irregular in shape, sickle cells are fragile and break apart easily. Normal red blood cells live an average of four months before they die and need to be replaced. Sickle-shaped cells however only live an average of 20 days. The result of this shortage of blood cells is a loss of energy and general sense of fatigue.
Other symptoms of sickle cell disease include:

• Hand-Foot Syndrome – Often the first sign of sickle cell disease. It is caused by a lack of blood flow to the hands and feet

• Episodes of Pain – Referred to as a “crisis”, these episodes of pain occur when blood flow is blocked to the chest, abdomen, and joints. The frequency and duration of the episodes vary from person to person, but in severe cases, they can result in hospitalization.

• Frequent Infections and Fever– Sickle Cell can cause damage to the spleen, an organ that fights infection, making those with sickle cell at greater risk of developing an infection and an accompanying fever.

• Changes in Skin – People with sickle cell disease can develop a yellow tint to their skin or the whites of their eyes. Skin and nail beds can often become pale.

• Delayed growth – By not receiving enough oxygen rich red blood cells, those with sickle cell disease may also not get the necessary nutrients essential for growth.

The risk of inheriting sickle cell disease is a genetic one. For a baby to be born with it, both parents must carry the sickle cell gene. Doctors can diagnose sickle cell disease before a child is born. Couples who are at risk for passing on this disease to their children may want to talk with a genetic counselor about prenatal testing. The sickle cell gene is more common in families that come from Africa, India, Carribbean islands, and Central and South America.

To determine if you have sickle cell disease, your doctor can order a test to check for hemoglobin S, the defective form of hemoglobin that underlies sickle cell anemia. Further tests can confirm the existence of one gene (carrying the sickle cell trait) or two genes (sickle cell anemia). For those who have sickle cell anemia, treatment is aimed at treating the symptoms and avoiding crisis. Regular check-ups to monitor your red blood cell count are important. Medications are available to reduce pain and prevent complications can be prescribed, and blood transfusions, supplemental oxygen and even bone marrow transplants may also be necessary.

Jamaica Hospital serves a culturally rich and diverse population. Many members of our community are from the parts of the world most often affected by sickle cell disease. In recognition of National Sickle Cell Awareness Month, Jamaica Hospital’s encourages anyone living with sickle cell disease to carefully manage their condition. The hospital also recommends all potential parents to be tested for the sickle cell trait.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Things You Should Know About Dental Cavities

 

 

 

 

 

Did you know that more than 90 percent of the population has had a dental cavity?

The American Dental Association (ADA) defines a dental cavity as, “The destruction of your tooth enamel (the hard outer layer of your teeth) that causes a hole in the tooth.

They further state that when plaque forms on your teeth, combined with eating and drinking foods that contain sugar, the collective bacteria produced attack the tooth enamel.

Some ways you can prevent tooth decay are:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day using fluoride toothpaste.
  • Use floss or interdental cleaner to clean between your teeth daily.
  • Eat healthy, well balanced meals.
  • Limit snacking.

Since cavities mostly happen in adolescents, your dentist may suggest the use of supplemental fluoride or dental sealants (a plastic proactive coating) applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth.

Nothing combats tooth decay more than regular visits to your dentist for professional cleanings and oral examinations.  If you are at low risk of cavities or gum disease, it is recommended that you see your dentist once yearly.  If you are at higher risk, you may need to visit your dentist every three or four months.

If your teeth are in need of a check -up, you can make an appointment with one of our board certified dentists at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Dental Center by calling 718-206-6980.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You Sure This Burger Isn’t Meat?

 

 

 

 

 

If you are a Vegetarian who has missed the taste and juiciness of an all American beef burger, you may not have to pine any longer.  The rage right now, whether called Impossible, Superiority or Beyond, are meatless burgers that replicate the texture, taste and succulence of meat.

The Washington Post recently highlighted one such burger – Superiority Burger.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 cup dried red quinoa
  • 1½ cups plus 2 tablespoons water
  • 1¼ teaspoons fine sea salt, plus more as needed
  • 2 medium carrots, scrubbed well and cut into ¼ -inch dice (about 1 cup)
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more as needed for frying
  • 1 large yellow onion, chopped (about 1½ cups)
  • 1 tablespoon fennel seed, toasted and ground (see NOTES)
  • 1 teaspoon chili powder
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup cooked or no-salt-added canned chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
  • ½ cup coarse dried bread crumbs, such as panko
  • ¾ cup walnuts, toasted and crushed (see NOTES)
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice (from 1 lemon)
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon Sriracha or other hot chili sauce
  • 2 tablespoons potato starch
  • 8 soft buns, toasted, for serving

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

Combine the quinoa, 1½ cups of the water and ¼ teaspoon of the salt in a small saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low, cover and cook until fluffy, 35 to 45 minutes. Uncover, transfer to a large bowl and let cool.

While the quinoa is cooking, spread the diced carrots on a quarter baking sheet; roast (middle rack) until dark around the edges and soft, 20 to 25 minutes. Let cool.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, add the onion and cook, stirring frequently, until it is translucent and lightly browned at the edges, 6 to 7 minutes. Stir in the fennel seed, chili powder, ¼ teaspoon of the pepper and ½ teaspoon of the salt; cook until the spices are very fragrant, 30 seconds. Add the chickpeas and cook, stirring frequently, until they are very tender. Pour in the vinegar; use a spatula to dislodge any browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Use a potato masher or large fork, to coarsely mash the onion-chickpea mixture.

Scrape the onion-chickpea mixture into the bowl with the quinoa. Add the roasted carrots, bread crumbs, walnuts, lemon juice, parsley, Sriracha or other hot chili sauce, the remaining ½ teaspoon of the salt and ¼ teaspoon of the pepper, and mix well. Taste, and add more salt, as needed.

Whisk together the potato starch and the remaining 2 tablespoons of water in a small bowl to form a thick, smooth slurry. Fold that into the burger mixture.

Use a ½ -cup measure to scoop 8 equal portions. Shape each one into a ¾ -inch-thick disk.

Pour the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil into a large saute pan or cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Once the oil shimmers, add as many patties as will fit without overcrowding. Working in batches, pan-fry the patties until browned, about 3 minutes on each side.

To serve, place each patty on a toasted bun.

To read the entire article visit – https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/finally-you-can-make-a-superiority-burger-at-home/2018/05/21/16ee154a-594e-11e8-858f-12becb4d6067_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.467056961aa2

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Prenatal Massage

Having a baby is a beautiful time in a woman’s life, but the pregnancy itself isn’t always a pleasant experience. Can a prenatal massage help?

The goals of a prenatal massage are the same as a regular massage – to relax tense muscles, improve circulation, offer relaxation, and to re-energize the body and mind.

Many women experience joint pain, neck and back pain, leg cramping, and sciatica during pregnancy. Massage therapy addresses the inflamed nerves by helping release tension in nearby muscles.

A prenatal massage also improves blood circulation and reduces the risk of edema, or swelling of the joints during pregnancy by stimulating soft tissue. This reduces fluid build-up around joints. Improved blood flow also helps the body’s lymphatic system work more efficiently by aiding in the removal of toxins and tissue waste.

By ridding the body of certain stress hormones, a prenatal massage can reduce anxiety and improve an expecting mother’s overall mood.  Other benefits include the alleviation of headaches, reduced instances of insomnia, decreased levels of depression, and even improved labor outcomes.

When choosing a massage therapist, be sure to pick one who is certified in prenatal massage. Certified Prenatal Massage Therapists are trained to provide relief to known sore spots and also know to avoid applying pressure to very sensitive pressure points. They know the appropriate techniques to use and positions to recommend and may even have a specially designed massage table for pregnant women.

A prenatal massage may not be for everyone.  Women with certain conditions, such as preeclampsia, pregnancy induced hypertension or with a history of pre-term labor should not receive a prenatal massage. All women should consult with their prenatal care provider before scheduling a massage.

If you have questions about prenatal massage or would like to schedule an appointment with an OB/GYN at Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center, please call 718-291-3276.

For more health tips and information visit us on Facebook.com/JamaicaHospital

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Offers a Low Dose CT Scan

CT scans are widely used across the medical field to perform diagnostic exams, and for many patients, the risk of radiation exposure is concerning. To address this concern, Jamaica Hospital is utilizing a low-dose CT scanner.

Jamaica Hospital’s, state-of-the-art GE CT scanners boast quick scans and use high-definition technology to produce precise images, using 30%-40% less radiation.

CT scanners are a specialized technology that provide detailed pictures of muscles, organs and tissues and are a vital diagnostic tool. The clarity of these images help lead to accurate diagnoses, while lower doses of radiation improves patient safety. Comparatively, low-dose CT scans are just as effective as the traditional scanners used in the past.

Low dose scans are commonly used to diagnose muscle and bone disorders, determine the location of tumors and infections, guide procedures, such as surgery and radiation therapies, identify diseases and conditions, such as cancer and heart disease, and detect internal bleeding and injuries.

What Happens During a CT Scan?

Obtaining a CT scan requires lying on a table that moves slowly through a large imaging machine. In order to produce clearer pictures, some patients may be required to swallow a dye or have it injected into their veins.

Patients are advised against wearing jewelry, eyeglasses, hairpins, or any other objects that could affect the quality of images.

If your physician requested that you have a CT scan performed and you would like to schedule an appointment at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6138.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Lemon Water

Did you know that starting your day with the smallest changes in your routine, such as drinking lemon water,  can help you on your path to a healthy lifestyle?

According to the Cleveland Clinic, some benefits of lemon water are:

  • Aids Digestion
  • Helps you stay hydrated
  • Is weight-loss friendly
  • Prevents oxidation
  • Supplies a healthy dose of vitamin C
  • Provides a potassium boost
  • Helps prevent kidney stones

All it takes is squeezing half of a fresh lemon into an 8 oz. glass of water.  The best part is you can’t consume too much and it will really kick start your day!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

WELLNESS WEDNESDAY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leonardo da Vinci, although best known as a painter, happend to be fascinated by science. Like any modern day scientist, he used observations, common-sense reasoning and research to find answers to satisfy the many questions he had regarding the health of the human body, mind and soul.

He cataloged his findings in his “Notebooks.”  We are sharing one of his thoughts here and wish you a great #wellnesswednesday

“Vitality and beauty are gifts of Nature for those who live according to its laws.” ~ Leonardo da Vinci

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Benefits of Eating Fish Rich in Omega-3

The American Heart Association recommends eating two servings of non-fried fish per week.

Due to the omega-3 fatty acids in many types of seafood, the heart benefits of eating fish are numerous.  By consuming omega-3, you can reduce inflammation and help prevent heart rhythm abnormalities.  You may also improve the flexibility of your arteries and help lower your cholesterol.

According to Consumerreports.org, some of the key positive findings for eating fish are:

  • 50 percent lower risk of sudden cardiac death in those who ate one fatty fish meal a week compared with a diet containing little or no seafood.
  • People who ate one serving of fish a week had a 14 percent lower risk of ischemic stroke (the type caused by a blood clot in the brain) than those who ate little or no fish.
  • Those who consumed seafood four or more times a week had a 22 percent lower risk of coronary heart disease overall vs. those who ate it less than once a month.

Some fish that are high in omega-3 are:

  • Atlantic Mackerel
  • Freshwater Coho Salmon
  • Sardines
  • Salmon
  • Herring
  • Lake Trout
  • Albacore Tuna

Keep in mind that those with coronary artery disease or heart failure may not get enough omega-3 by diet alone. Most people can eat fish without being concerned, but pregnant and breastfeeding women and young children should be more careful.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.