Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts

March is National Nutrition Month.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Nutrition is marking the occasion with a healthy and tasty receipe for Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts.

This receipe serves four (4)

We would like to thank our

INGREDIENTS:

Fish

Marinade:

3 Tablespoon Orange Juice

1 Tablespoon lemon juice

1.5 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Teaspoon canola oil

Salt and pepper to taste

4- 4 oz Salmon filets

Haricot Verts- French Green beans

1 lb green beans, French, fresh

1 Tablespoon canola oil

3 cloves garlic, peeled, minced

Kosher salt to taste

Couscous:

Prepare according to package

PREPARATION:

To prepare fish:

  1. Combine marinade ingredients bowl, place salmon in marinade
  2. Heat canola oil in sautee pan over high heat
  3. Remove fish from marinade and discard excess marinade
  4. Place fish in hot pan, Flesh side down, cook for 4-5 minutes, flip fish to skin side, cover pan and cook 4 additional minutes or until cooked through and fish is flakey

To prepare green beans

If using fresh green beans – follow steps below. If using frozen – skip to step 5

  1. Trim ends of green beans
  2. Bring pot of water to boil, blanch green beans for 1-2 minutes in boiling water
  3. Shock green beans in ice bath
  4. Drain green beans
  5. Heat oil in sauté pan over medium high heat
  6. Add minced garlic, sauté 30 seconds until fragrant
  7. Add green beans and sauté for 1 minute or until evenly coated and heated through. (if using frozen green beans, will need more time to cook through)
  8. Season with kosher salt to taste

To prepare the couscous

  1. Cook couscous according to the package directions

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefits of Couples Counseling

There are many changes that couples can go through during the course of their relationship.  In some instances, these changes can lead to undue stress, strain and conflict on their relationship.

During these times, couples may benefit from counseling.  Couples counseling can be effective in helping you and your partner heal, foster forgiveness and help you reconnect.

Some benefits from counseling are:

  • Learning how to communicate in a non-adversarial way
  • Understanding the importance of listening to your partner and how to process what your partner is saying
  • Learning how to get your point across with assertion and not aggression or anger
  • Finding a way to discuss your issues without fear of retaliation or hurting the feelings of your partner
  • Learning how to work through your issues in a safe environment
  • Getting your feelings out in the open and not letting them fester
  • Re-committing to work out your issues together without engaging in conflict
  • Developing a deeper understanding of your partner and what their needs are

By entering into counseling, you may find that you and your partner are willing to put in the work needed to get through a difficult time. If the opposite is realized, you will then feel less guilt when you make the decision to end the relationship knowing you have given it every chance.

If you and your partner would like to speak with a counselor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, call 718-206-5588 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Oh My Aching Feet!

Corns and calluses are caused by pressure or friction on skin, which leads to the formation of thickened skin on the top or side of a toe. Complications from corns and calluses are rarely serious; however, if you are a diabetic they can lead to more serious issues.

Diabetics often have impaired sensitivity and may not be aware of the friction or presence of a corn or callous. Since they are unaware, the corn or callous can progress into ulcers or secondary infections without the person knowing.

In addition, diabetics don’t, usually, heal as quickly as non-diabetics and their infections can become life-threatening.

Indications that you may have a corn or callous:

  • Skin is thick and hardened.
  • Skin may be flaky and dry.
  • Hardened, thick skin areas are found feet or other areas that may be rubbed or pressed.
  • The affected areas can be painful and may bleed.

According to the National Institutes of Health, preventing friction by wearing proper fitting shoes and avoiding walking barefoot are often the only preventative measures you can take.

Regular examination of you feet can help you to identify any problems and, if you receive a foot injury, you should seek immediate medical attention.

If you have diabetes and are experiencing corns/calluses that are painful, red, warm, or there is drainage in the area, you should call your healthcare provider immediately to determine the cause.

To make an appointment with a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Centers Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7005 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefit of Breast Milk vs. Formula

Did you know that babies who are breastfed have a better chance of fighting off viruses and bacterial infections than babies who aren’t breastfed?
Well, it’s true; breast milk contains antibodies that can fight off viruses and bacteria, as well as lowering your baby’s risk of having asthma or allergies.

Some additional benefits of breastfeeding are:
• Breastfeeding strengthens a baby’s immune system
• Breastfeeding aids in digestion with less bouts of diarrhea, constipation or colic
• Breastfeeding in premature babies is an effective way to enhance health, growth and development

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that babies be exclusively breastfed exclusively for the first six months. Beyond that, breastfeeding is encouraged until at least 12 months, or longer if both the mother and baby are willing to continue breastfeeding.

The reason healthcare professionals are promoting breastfeeding over formula is commercial formulas try to duplicate breast milk; however, they are unable to completely match breast milk’s exact composition. Breast milk is a living substance made by each mother for her individual infant.

Choosing whether to breastfeed or formula feed your baby is one of the biggest decisions a new parent will make. If would like more information about the benefits of breast feeding over formula feeding, you can speak with a Lactation Specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Women’s Health Center. Call 718-291-3276 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The NERVE of Neuropathy!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 25.8 million people in the United States have diabetes. Typically, 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some sort of nerve problems, know as neuropathy.

Neuropathy is a shorter term for peripheral neuropathy, meaning nerve damage in the peripheral nervous system. Neuropathy from diabetes can damage the nerves in your hands, arms, feet and legs. This condition can cause pain, numbness and weakness. Depending on the degree of neuropathy, and how long you have been a diabetic, nerve problems can occur in every organ system, including the digestive tract, heart and reproductive organs.

The highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes for at least 25 years. Diabetic neuropathy also appears to be more common in people who have issues with controlling their blood glucose, have high blood pressure and are overweight.

Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary depending on the nerves affected and develop gradually over the years. Symptoms may include:

  • Trouble with balance
  • Numbness and tingling of extremities
  • Abnormal sensation to a body part (Dysesthesia)
  • Diarrhea
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Urinary incontinence
  • Vision changes
  • Burning or electric pain in extremities

When treating diabetic neuropathy, a nutritionist may recommend healthier food choices and exercise to help lower your glucose and glycohemoglobin levels. Additionally, analgesics and low doses of antidepressants can be prescribed for pain relief, burning and tingling.

If you are a diabetic and have been experiencing symptoms of neuropathy, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center and Department of Nutrition can help. Call 718-206-7001 to get the process started.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Psoriatic Arthritis

According to the American College of Rheumatology, psoriatic arthritis is a type of inflammatory arthritis that occurs in some patients with psoriasis (is a chronic skin condition caused by an overactive immune system) and can affect the joints in the body.

It is a chronic disease that may present as mild with occasional flair ups or, in more severe cases, can cause joint damage in fingers and toes, as well as larger joints in the lower extremities, such as knees, back and sacroiliac joints in the pelvis.

The Mayo Clinic describes the symptoms of psoriatic arthritis as:

  • Swollen fingers and toesPsoriatic arthritis can cause a painful, sausage-like swelling of your fingers and toes. You may also develop swelling and deformities in your hands and feet before having significant joint symptoms.
  • Foot pain -Psoriatic arthritis can also cause pain at the points where tendons and ligaments attach to your bones — especially at the back of your heel (Achilles tendinitis) or in the sole of your foot (plantar fasciitis).
  • Lower back pain -Some people develop a condition called spondylitis as a result of psoriatic arthritis. Spondylitis mainly causes inflammation of the joints between the vertebrae of your spine and in the joints between your spine and pelvis (sacroiliitis).

Psoriatic arthritis can go into remission.  When in remission, the symptoms may alternate causing them to subside for a time and then reappearing in the form of painful, swollen joints.

Many people with psoriatic arthritis may first think they have rheumatoid arthritis since both diseases have similar symptoms. The only difference is that psoriatic arthritis is prevalent in patients who have psoriasis of the skin as well.

When seeing your doctor to determine whether or not you may have psoriatic arthritis your doctor may examine your joints for swelling or tenderness, check your fingernails, hands, feet and toes for pitting, flaking or other abnormalities.

Psoriatic arthritis is diagnosed by X-rays, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), testing the rheumatoid factor (RF) antibody in your blood or a joint fluid test to see if you have uric acid crystals in your joint fluid.

Since there isn’t a cure for psoriatic arthritis, healthcare professionals are focused on controlling the symptoms and thwarting permanent damage to the joints.

Some medications prescribed to treat psoriatic arthritis include:

  • NSAIDs – Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Over-the-counter NSAIDs include ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, and others) and naproxen sodium (Aleve).
  • Disease-modifying ant rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) -These drugs can slow the progression of psoriatic arthritis and save the joints and other tissues from permanent damage.
  • Immunosuppressants -These medications act to tame your immune system, which is out of control in psoriatic arthritis.
  • TNF-alpha inhibitors – Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an inflammatory substance produced by your body. TNF-alpha inhibitors can help reduce pain, morning stiffness, and tender or swollen joints.

Other procedures that have been effective are steroid injections or joint replacement surgery.  Steroid injections reduce inflammation rapidly and joint replacement surgery replaces the severely damaged joint with an artificial prosthesis made of metal and/or plastic.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of psoriatic arthritis and would like to speak with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital, call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment with a Rheumatology specialist.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Homemade Oat Milk Recipe

Oat milk is a dairy-free milk alternative that is made from oats.  It has a ratio of 1 cup of oats to ¾ cup of water.  The mixture is then strained to create a liquid.

According to https://www.livestrong.com, oat milk is a healthy alternative to whole milk and skim milk.  It is rich in vitamin D, iron, calcium, potassium and fiber.  One cup of store bought oat milk may have up to 120 calories, 5 grams of fat, 3 grams of protein, 14 grams of carbohydrate and 2 grams of fiber.

Comparatively, cow’s milk contains 3.5% fat, 146 calories, 11 grams of carbohydrate, 8 grams of protein and 8 grams of fat and skim mild has 83 calories, 122 grams of carbohydrate, 0.2 grams of fat and 8 grams of protein.  Even though the numbers for skim milk seem better than oat milk, skim milk still contains lactose.

If you’d like to try your hand at making your own oat milk, here is a simple recipe from https://simpleveganblog.com that you may want to try. 

Prep time:      15 minutes

Total time:      15 minutes

Yield:              3 – 4 cups

Ingredients:

1 cup rolled or quick oats (100 g)

3 – 4 cups water (750ml – 1liter), depending on how thick you like your milk

Instructions:

  • Soak the oats in water for at least 30 minutes or overnight.
  • Drain the oats and wash them (discard the soaking water).
  • Blend the oats with 3 – 4 cups of clean water.
  • Strain the milk using cheesecloth, a strainer, a napkin or a nut milk bag.
  • Store oat milk in a sealed container in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Homemade oat milk reduces the risk of cross contamination with potential allergens at the manufacturer and can is less expensive to make than to purchase.

If you’d like to read more about oat milk, visit – https://www.flushinghospital.org/newsletter/?p=4603

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ways to Boost Your Metabolism as You Age

A less desired aspect of maturing is that your metabolism may naturally slow down.  This can cause a gradual loss of muscle mass and the numbers on your scale to creep up.

One of the most effective ways to boost your metabolism is to exercise.  As we age, extreme exercise regimens may no longer be what is recommended for us.  However, lower-impact exercises such as walking or bike riding can really give your metabolism the jump start it needs.

Another good way to stay ahead of your metabolism is to eat small meals that are high in protein, healthy snacks, such as yogurt, and drinking plenty of water throughout the day.  Try not to skip a meal because, if you do, your metabolism will think you are starving and slow down further.

Another method of speeding up a sluggish metabolism is with spices.  Try sprinkling chili pepper, ginger or turmeric on your meals.  They have all been found to have a positive effect on the metabolism.

Of course, if you have tried all these remedies to boost your metabolism and are still experiencing a slower than normal response, there may be an underlying medical condition.

Some medical conditions that can slow metabolism are:

  • Cushing’s syndrome – this illness happens when your body makes too much cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal system, creating a slow metabolism.
  • Hypothyroidism – (Underactive thyroid) in disease of the thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone. This can cause body functions to slow down and result in weight gain, as well as fatigue, joint pain, and other symptoms.
  • Graves’ disease – (Overactive thyroid) this thyroid disease occurs when the body’s immune system makes antibodies that attach to thyroid cells, stimulating the body to make too much thyroid hormone.
  • Hashimoto’s disease – is also called autoimmune thyroiditis, this occurs when the thyroid gland becomes chronically inflamed, causing it to secrete insufficient amounts of thyroid hormone.
  • Low testosterone levels – if you’re a man with a lower level of testosterone, a male sex hormone, you might find your metabolism altered.

If you have tried ways to boost your metabolism and are not seeing any results, you may want to check in with your doctor.  If you’d like to schedule an appointment with an Endocrinologist at Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Sleep Apnea

America’s expanding waistline may be responsible for another growing problem in our country – sleep apnea. Approximately 18 million Americans suffer from sleep apnea and many of them are overweight or obese. In fact, the most common cause of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in adults is obesity.

Obstructive sleep apnea is a common and serious disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops for 10 seconds or more during sleep. People with this condition often have trouble staying in a deep sleep because their throats close, blocking their airways. As a result, they partially awaken to start breathing properly. They don’t realize they’re waking up and may become very sleepy during the day.

Obstructive sleep apnea can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, and even death. People with sleep apnea are also at an increased risk of work and driving-related accidents, due to inadequate sleep at night.  It’s important that anyone with signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea — especially loud snoring, repeated nighttime awakenings and daytime sleepiness speak with a physician.

Fortunately, sleep apnea is treatable. Making an effort to lose weight is the best way to help people sleep better. Recent studies have proven that weight loss can significantly improve and potentially eliminate obstructive sleep apnea symptoms in obese individuals. If, however, weight loss attempts are not successful, a common and effective treatment for sleep apnea is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), where patients wear a mask connected to a machine that blows air into the throat, keeping it open while they sleep at night.

If you believe that you have sleep apnea, it is imperative that you get tested. Speak with your doctor and request a referral to a sleep center so experts can perform an overnight sleep study. Jamaica Hospital operates a three-bed, fully private, sleep center. For more information, please call 718-206-5916.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Shift Work Sleep Disorder (SWSD)

If you work outside of normal daytime hours such as evening shifts, night shifts, rotating shifts or swing shifts, you may be at greater risk for developing shift work sleep disorder (SWSD).

SWSD is a sleep disorder that disrupts the circadian rhythm of an individual.

Your circadian rhythm is often called a “body clock.” It is a cycle that lets our bodies know when to rise, sleep, and eat.

More than 15 million people in the United States work various types of shifts. Some are better able than others to adjust to working irregular hours, but for those that are unable to adjust, SWSD can become a major factor in lessening their quality of life.

Some symptoms of sleep shift disorder are:

  • Excessive sleepiness
  • Difficulty falling or staying asleep
  • Problems concentrating
  • Irritability
  • Headaches
  • Increase risk of making mistakes and having accidents

SWSD can also have adverse effects on your health. Chronic sleep shift disorder can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, digestive issues and depression.

If you are a shift worker with irregular hours there are some treatment measures that can help:

  • Exercise Regularly
  • Keep a healthy diet
  • Keep your sleep area dark with black out drapes or use a sleep mask
  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine at least three hours before bedtime
  • Put away digital devices. The light from your device can play tricks on your brain, making it think it is daylight
  • If possible, take a 10-20 min nap during your shift

If none of the above treatment options seem to help you adjust to your irregular work schedules, you might want to consider contacting a sleep clinic. Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s has a state-of-the-art Sleep Center. Call 718-206-5916 for more information or to make an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.