BBQ Leftover Chicken Receipe

When you barbeque, you always seem to prepare more food than you need. Of course, this will leave you with leftovers more often than not. So what do you do with all that extra chicken?

If you are planning on finishing off your leftover chicken within a few days, wrap it tightly and keep it in the refrigerator. If you want to keep it for more than a few days, wrap the chicken in foil and seal it in a zip lock bag. Try to get as much air as possible out of the bag to preserve the leftovers for several months.

Take precaution when you are reheating your leftovers.  You do not have to reheat it on as low a temperature and slowly as you did the first time.  An oven temperature of around 325 degrees will work great. Do not overcook your chicken.  Overcooking can cause the chicken to become dry.

Properly reheated, your barbecued chicken should be just about as good as it was the day you first cooked it.

Now that we have discussed how to preserve your BBQ chicken, here’s a great way to reheat that chicken. Click the link below and follow the simple recipe that will take your leftover chicken and make it appear like an entirely different meal!

http://addapinch.com/cooking/bbq-chicken-bites-recipe/

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

TENDONITIS

Tendonitis is an inflammation or irritation of the thick cord (tendon) that attaches you bone to muscle.

This condition occurs when an area is repeatedly injured by impact. There are various activities that can cause tendonitis.  Some of the more common causes include:

  • Gardening
  • Manual Labor
  • Golfing and Tennis
  • Skiing
  • Throwing

Often times, the injury is due to a lack of conditioning, such as stretching, before exercise or playing sports.

Some other reasons for Tendonitis may be medical.  It can be brought on by the strain of rheumatoid arthritis, gout, psoriatic arthritis and thyroid disorders.

Tendonitis usually occurs anywhere in the body where a tendon connects to a muscle such as the shoulder, hip, knee, elbow, Achilles tendon or at the base of the thumb.

The good news is, you can prevent tendonitis from happening.  If you are starting an exercise regimen, you should gradually build up to a comfortable level.  This will help your body strength grow with your exercise level.

If you are experiencing pain in your tendons or joints and would like to make an appointment to see a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Could Smoking Be The Cause Of My Infertility?

The last week in April has been designated National Infertility Awareness Week (IVF). The observance is meant to bring awareness to the millions of Americans who are facing challenges when becoming pregnant; while removing any stigmas and barriers that remain in the way of having a child using IVF.

Some causes of infertility in women are issues with ovulation (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis, sexually transmitted infections and unhealthy body weight. However, there have been multiple studies to support the theory that smoking has an adverse effect on fertility. Research has found that the prevalence of infertility is higher, and the time it takes to conceive is longer in smokers as compared to nonsmokers. It has also been proven that smoking can affect every stage of the reproductive process in both sexes because the chemicals in cigarettes can cause damage to both male sperm and female eggs.

In women, smoking can lead to many fertility problems, including:

  • Problems with the fallopian tubes, including blockages (preventing egg and sperm from meeting) and an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy.
  • Damage to the eggs as they develop in the ovaries.
  • Increased risk of miscarriage, possibly due to damaged eggs, damage to the developing fetus, or unfavorable changes in the uterine lining, which may make healthy implantation of an embryo less likely.

In addition, smoking can cause a woman’s eggs to age prematurely, leading to an earlier onset of menopause and a shorter window to conceive.

The good news is that the damage done to the female reproductive system as a result of smoking is reversible. Typically, after quitting smoking, your chance of natural fertility should become viable within a year or less.

If you want to have a baby, but you are a smoker, quit now! If you need help, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers smoking cessation services to help you. For more information, please call 718-206-8494.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Are You At Risk for Asthma?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1 in 13 people has asthma. That translates to more than 26 million Americans.

Asthma is a condition in which your airways narrow and swell, producing extra mucus resulting in difficulty breathing.

If this narrowing and swelling occurs and worsens, it may lead to an asthma attack.

Some tips to help you prevent asthma symptoms from occurring include:

  • Family history of asthma
  • Viral respiratory infections as a child
  • Allergies
  • Smoking
  • Air Pollution
  • Obesity

Some strategies you help prevent the symptoms of asthma are:

  • Stop smoking and avoid public places where cigarette smoking occurs
  • Avoid outdoor exposure on heavy smog days
  • Adopt a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein
  • Avoid allergens that trigger asthma attacks, such as pet dander, dust, mites, mold and pollen.

If you have recurrent coughing or wheezing that lasts more than a couple of days or any other signs or symptoms of asthma listed above, you should schedule an appointment to see your doctor since treating asthma early can help prevent long-term lung damace and reduce the likelihood of your asthma worsening over time.

If you would like to speak with a respiratory specialist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Awaiting the arrival of your child or becoming a mother should be a time of great hope and happy anticipation, but for some, it can bring a wave of depression and anxiety. If you are experiencing depression and anxiety that occurred during or within one year after your pregnancy, you may have Perinatal Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD).

GAD is usually prevalent in those who have a history of depression, anxiety or substance abuse, a family history of mental illness, lack of a good support system, issues with a previous pregnancy or schedule and hormonal changes.

Some common signs of GAD are:

  • Feeling sad, depressed, and/or crying a lot
  • Diminished interest in becoming a mother
  • Feeling worthless or guilty, especially about not being a good mother
  • Strong anxiety, tension, and/or fear either about your future child or other things
  • Sleep problems
  • Thoughts of wanting to be dead or wanting to kill yourself
  • Having low energy
  • Loss of or increase in appetite or weight
  • Trouble focusing, remembering things, or making decisions
  • Feeling restless or irritable
  • Having headaches, chest pains, heart palpitations, numbness, or hyperventilation

Often times the new mom may experience disbelief, embarrassment, shame or guilt with GAD before seeking treatment to manage the disorder.  Successful management of GAD can be done through medication and/or therapy.

If you are expecting a baby or have just become a mom and are feeling any of the symptoms listed above, you can make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Mental Health for a screening.

To make an appointment, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Foods that are Suprisingly High in Sugar

As our lifestyles move toward healthier eating habits, it is not enough to just count calories, carbohydrates or proteins; we should also be checking how much sugar is in the “healthy” foods we are eating.

Fruit, for example, although healthy for you, can be high in sugar.  A pineapple has 16 grams of sugar per slice, there are 17 grams per of sugar in one large banana and a small apple has a whopping 19 grams of sugar.  Although all are healthy, you have to be what you eat; especially, if you are a diabetic.

Some other “healthy” foods that are surprisingly high in sugar are:

  • Lo-fat yogurt
  • Fruit juice
  • Sport drinks
  • Chocolate milk
  • Granola
  • Protein bars
  • Salad dressing
  • Smoothies
  • Non-dairy milk

The American Heart Association recommends that women limited their added sugar intake to six teaspoons per day, while men should limit their intake to nine teaspoons.

It is a known fact that ingesting too much sugar is not good for your overall health.  If your sugar intake is more than the recommended daily dosage, you may be at risk for obesity, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and cancer.

If you are concerned about your sugar intake and would like to speak with a Registered Dietitian at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is My Wellness Routine Causing Me Stress?

Did you ever notice when you turn on the TV, radio, read a magazine or listen to a podcast, the topic being discussed is how boosting your wellness routine will reduce your stress? But, what if your wellness routine is what is causing your stress?

Experts will tell you that there is a fine line between positive self-care and over reaching your wellness goals, causing the activation of the very anxiety based triggers you are seeking to quell.  Some of the routines you may have adopted to make you feel better can often be another stressful thing in your already jam packed lifestyle.  If this is the case, it is time for a change.

Some ways to determine if your wellness routine is a cause of stress are:

  • Feeling overwhelmed – If your morning routine is cutting into your responsibilities, try to accommodate a different start time when your home is quieter and time can be spent focusing on yourself.
  • Not feeling the benefit – If your wellness routine isn’t helping you achieve your goals, you may want to tweak it a bit and change the activity. If your spin class isn’t helping you, switch to yoga or a brisk walk.
  • Routine rut – Like anything else, sometimes our wellness routine can get a bit boring. Add some fun to your existing routine by partnering up with friends.  Adding a bit of laughter to your daily routine
  • Your wellness routine has to be realistic. It has to become every facet of your day slowly working to transform you into the best version of yourself.
  • Your wellness routine has to be realistic. It has to become every facet of your day slowly working to transform you into the best version of yourself.

Your wellness routine has to be realistic.  It has to become part of every facet of your day, slowly working to transform you into the best version of yourself. Be honest with yourself and simplify your routine so that you can reset your priorities and avoid burnout.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts

March is National Nutrition Month.  Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Department of Nutrition is marking the occasion with a healthy and tasty receipe for Citrus Marinated Salmon with Couscous and Sauteed Haricot Verts.

This receipe serves four (4)

We would like to thank our

INGREDIENTS:

Fish

Marinade:

3 Tablespoon Orange Juice

1 Tablespoon lemon juice

1.5 Tablespoon minced garlic

1 Teaspoon canola oil

Salt and pepper to taste

4- 4 oz Salmon filets

Haricot Verts- French Green beans

1 lb green beans, French, fresh

1 Tablespoon canola oil

3 cloves garlic, peeled, minced

Kosher salt to taste

Couscous:

Prepare according to package

PREPARATION:

To prepare fish:

  1. Combine marinade ingredients bowl, place salmon in marinade
  2. Heat canola oil in sautee pan over high heat
  3. Remove fish from marinade and discard excess marinade
  4. Place fish in hot pan, Flesh side down, cook for 4-5 minutes, flip fish to skin side, cover pan and cook 4 additional minutes or until cooked through and fish is flakey

To prepare green beans

If using fresh green beans – follow steps below. If using frozen – skip to step 5

  1. Trim ends of green beans
  2. Bring pot of water to boil, blanch green beans for 1-2 minutes in boiling water
  3. Shock green beans in ice bath
  4. Drain green beans
  5. Heat oil in sauté pan over medium high heat
  6. Add minced garlic, sauté 30 seconds until fragrant
  7. Add green beans and sauté for 1 minute or until evenly coated and heated through. (if using frozen green beans, will need more time to cook through)
  8. Season with kosher salt to taste

To prepare the couscous

  1. Cook couscous according to the package directions

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefits of Couples Counseling

There are many changes that couples can go through during the course of their relationship.  In some instances, these changes can lead to undue stress, strain and conflict on their relationship.

During these times, couples may benefit from counseling.  Couples counseling can be effective in helping you and your partner heal, foster forgiveness and help you reconnect.

Some benefits from counseling are:

  • Learning how to communicate in a non-adversarial way
  • Understanding the importance of listening to your partner and how to process what your partner is saying
  • Learning how to get your point across with assertion and not aggression or anger
  • Finding a way to discuss your issues without fear of retaliation or hurting the feelings of your partner
  • Learning how to work through your issues in a safe environment
  • Getting your feelings out in the open and not letting them fester
  • Re-committing to work out your issues together without engaging in conflict
  • Developing a deeper understanding of your partner and what their needs are

By entering into counseling, you may find that you and your partner are willing to put in the work needed to get through a difficult time. If the opposite is realized, you will then feel less guilt when you make the decision to end the relationship knowing you have given it every chance.

If you and your partner would like to speak with a counselor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, call 718-206-5588 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Oh My Aching Feet!

Corns and calluses are caused by pressure or friction on skin, which leads to the formation of thickened skin on the top or side of a toe. Complications from corns and calluses are rarely serious; however, if you are a diabetic they can lead to more serious issues.

Diabetics often have impaired sensitivity and may not be aware of the friction or presence of a corn or callous. Since they are unaware, the corn or callous can progress into ulcers or secondary infections without the person knowing.

In addition, diabetics don’t, usually, heal as quickly as non-diabetics and their infections can become life-threatening.

Indications that you may have a corn or callous:

  • Skin is thick and hardened.
  • Skin may be flaky and dry.
  • Hardened, thick skin areas are found feet or other areas that may be rubbed or pressed.
  • The affected areas can be painful and may bleed.

According to the National Institutes of Health, preventing friction by wearing proper fitting shoes and avoiding walking barefoot are often the only preventative measures you can take.

Regular examination of you feet can help you to identify any problems and, if you receive a foot injury, you should seek immediate medical attention.

If you have diabetes and are experiencing corns/calluses that are painful, red, warm, or there is drainage in the area, you should call your healthcare provider immediately to determine the cause.

To make an appointment with a Doctor of Podiatric Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Centers Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7005 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.