Diabetes and the Myths that go with it.

Diabetes is a serious illness. It affects 30 million people in the United States. There are many facts that we know about the disease, and not surprisingly, many myths associated with it as well.

 

 

Some of these myths include:

  • You can catch diabetes from someone else. False  Diabetes is not contagious
  • People with diabetes catch more colds and other illnesses. False. Diabetics aren’t any more at risk for catching a cold than anyone else.
  • People with diabetes can’t eat sugar. False. Sugar should be consumed in small quantities as part of a balanced meal.
  • Only overweight  people get diabetes. False. A  person can be slim, medium build or heavy and still be a diabetic.
  • People who have diabetes shouldn’t drive. False. People with diabetes can do  anything a person who doesn’t have diabetes does.
  • Type II diabetes is not as serious as Type I. False. Every form of diabetes is to be taken seriously. It is just treated differently.
  • Nobody in my family has diabetes therefore I won’t get it. False. While it does run in families, anyone is at risk regardless of family history.
  • Borderline diabetes is not real diabetes. False. It may only mean you are at higher risk of developing diabetes.
  • Eating fruit is bad for diabetes. False. Fruit should be eaten in small portions. Excessive amounts may cause a problem because fruit contains carbohydrates.

Speak to your physician if you would like to clarify the facts about diabetes and your ability to do things. You can schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Can Stroke Affect Young People Too

Stroke is usually thought of as something that happens to older people but an estimated 10% of stroke victims are under 45.

One study revealed that when a stroke occurs in younger individuals, the mortality rate is seven times higher than the general population. If a younger person has more than one stroke, their mortality rate increases to 17 times higher than the general population.

Risk factors include:

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • Elevated cholesterol
  • Intravenous drug addiction
  • High blood pressure

Unfortunately, because strokes are less common in younger people, diagnosis and treatment is delayed. Diagnosing a stroke is usually done with the aid of an MRI. Younger people who are diagnosed quickly tend to do well when treated early with medication that can break up a blood clot. It is important that this medication be administered within the first 4 ½ hours.

To identify a stroke it is important to remember the FAST acronym which stands for the signs and symptoms of a stroke

Facial drooping

Ability to raise arms is limited or absent

Slurred speech

Time – how much time it takes to summon help

There are a few factors that can help prevent a stroke. These include maintaining a proper weight, smoking cessation, getting regular exercise, having a diet low in saturated fats and high in fruits and vegetables, and avoiding alcoholic beverages.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to discuss your medical concerns, please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on Jo-Ann Campudoni

This month, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is proud to shine its Employee Spotlight on Jo-Ann Campudoni, Manager at TJH Medical Services, P.C.

Jo-Ann is a native of Queens, New York and grew up in Rockaway Beach, where she still resides to this day.

Jo-Ann graduated from Beach Channel High School in Rockaway and attended Andrews University in Michigan where she majored in Psychology. She has three amazing children of which she is very proud. She has a son who is currently serving in the Coast Guard, a daughter who is a Corporal in the Marines and a younger daughter who works as a customer service supervisor for FedEx. Jo-Ann comes from a very large family; she is the youngest of eight children. Her siblings live in various parts of the country and she wishes that they could see each other more frequently than they do.

Her philosophy on life is to get the most out of it as you can. She believes, “Life may not be perfect but you have to make it an adventure and go ever upward.” In her free time, she enjoys going to concerts, movies, reading books and meeting new people and learning about their experiences. Jo-Ann loves to dance and listen to music. She studied classical ballet, jazz, and contemporary dance. When she was in her teens she danced in the Alvin Ailey Dance Cadre. Her interest in music has brought her to hosting her own Internet radio show which can be found on social media outlets and gives her the opportunity to meet people in the musical world.

Jo-Ann believes in treating each patient with great respect and compassion. She feels that her experiences in life have taught her how much people appreciate being treated well. She enjoys working with her team at TJH because they work together so well. It is very much like a family in her department. Everyone works together to make the patient experience a good one. Jo-Ann looks forward to working with the team for a long time which is a goal we hope she achieves.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is a hernia ?

A hernia occurs when an organ or body part pushes through a weak spot in muscle or connective tissue into a part of the body that it isn’t supposed to be in. While some hernias can occur at birth, others may form later in life.  These types of hernias may occur as a result of heavy lifting, straining, pregnancy and obesity.

There are several types of hernias that include:

  • Inguinal hernias – Occurs when a part of the intestine pushes into the inguinal canal. Most commonly seen in males.
  • Femoral hernia -Occurs when the femoral artery and vein pass through the canal between the abdomen and the groin. Most often seen in females.
  • Epigastric hernia – Occurs when a small piece of fat protrudes through a weak spot in the abdominal muscles  located between the belly button and the breastbone
  • Umbilical hernia – Occurs when a portion of the intestine pushes through the abdominal wall next to the belly button
  • Hiatal hernia – Occurs when the stomach pushes through the diaphragm into the chest and causes heartburn
  • Incisional hernia – Occurs when a portion of the intestine pushes through the abdominal wall where surgery had been performed previously

The symptoms of a hernia often depend on where it is located. Some hernias will cause pain while there are others that only have physical signs, such as a bulging out of the skin, but aren’t painful. When a portion of the intestine pushes through a muscle and becomes trapped it can be very painful block the intestinal blood supply. These hernias require urgent surgical attention. A hernia can be prevented by avoiding lifting heavy objects improperly, maintaining proper weigh, care when coughing, having a diet that contains adequate fiber, and avoiding excessive straining during a bowel movement.

Treatment for a hernia depends on its location, size and the amount of discomfort. In some cases surgery isn’t necessary and the hernia can be pushed into place and held there by a device called a truss. Surgical options include closing the weak spot in the muscle with stitches, , using a mesh to reinforce the weak muscle that the hernia is pushing through, and laparoscopic surgery to repair the defect that is causing the hernia.

If you are experiencing any discomfort from a hernia, it is important to seek professional help to learn what the options are to repair it. You can schedule an appointment with a surgeon at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is fibromyalgia and why is it painful ?

Fibromyalgia is a condition thought to be caused by an increase in the way the brain processes pain sensation throughout the musculoskeletal system of the body. The result is a chronic sensation of pain that is often debilitating and life changing. Women tend to be affected by fibromyalgia more than men but the reason for that is unclear. In some people, fibromyalgia appears after a trauma, a surgical procedure, an infection, or after a stressful event. There also may be some correlation to it running in families.
Scientists believe that there may be an overstimulation of the pain receptors that causes the symptoms.  Symptoms of fibromyalgia include:
• Pain all over the body
• Fatigue
• Difficulty focusing
• Migraine headaches
• Anxiety
• Depression
Fibromyalgia is diagnosed through a physical exam and blood tests that examines thyroid function, red and white blood cell count, rheumatoid arthritis factor and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. If a person has pain for three months and no obvious medical reason for it, it might be reason to rule out fibromyalgia.
There is no one method of treating fibromyalgia that is completely effective.
• Treatment options include:
• Physical therapy
• Pain relievers
• Anti-depressants
• Getting adequate rest
• Acupuncture
• Regular exercise
If you have symptoms of fibromyalgia and would like to schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight Shines on David Hutt

This month we are proud to shine our Employee Spotlight on David Hutt, Supportive Care Associate in the Operating Room. David is a native of Westchester County, having grown up in Peekskill where he attended Peekskill High School. David joined Jamaica Hospital 23 years ago, first rotating between units before moving to 3 North and currently in the operating room where he has worked for 21 years.

David is very proud of the work he does at Jamaica Hospital. He says that his co-workers are like family to him. Everyone works well together. He also enjoys interacting every day with his patients. He has received many compliments from the people he has helped. He credits his compassion and sense of humor for helping to make the patients’ experience a pleasant one. He looks forward to many more years of working at the hospital with his team.

David is known as an avid sports fan. His favorite team is the Pittsburgh Steelers, and he also roots for the Pittsburgh Penguins, The L.A. Lakers, and the New York Mets. He enjoys listening to all types of music, going to the movies, concerts, and sometimes just staying home and watching TV. Two of his favorite vacations were spent on a cruise and also when he went to Cancun. The best way he can think of to spend his free time is with family and close friends.

David has been living in Queens for 33 years, and the last 7 with his wife in Ozone Park and says that he really enjoys the cultural diversity and fast pace of the neighborhood and the city.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Service Wants to Educate the Public on How to “Stop the Bleed”

What would you if you encountered a traumatic event where someone was bleeding and no medical professional was immediately available? Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Division wants to make you aware of a national campaign called “Stop the Bleed” that can help in these types of situations.

Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of preventable death from trauma.  Stop the Bleed is a national awareness campaign that was initiated by the White House in 2015 to bring attention to this very serious situation. It is a collaboration of a number of Federal agencies, non- profit organizations and corporations. The purpose of this campaign is to teach as many people as possible what to do when faced with a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives. When an emergency arises often the first people on the scene will be non-medical professionals without much training in first aid. This campaign serves to train as many people as possible on what to do until help arrives.

These are the ABC’s to follow when someone is bleeding: :

  • A – Alert
  • Either call 9-1-1 or have another bystander make the call
  • B – Bleeding
  • Find the source of the bleed
  • C – Compress
  • Apply pressure to stop the bleeding. Cover the wound with a clean cloth and apply pressure with both hands, apply a tourniquet when possible, or pack the wound with gauze or a clean cloth

In addition it is important to assess the situation so that you can ensure your own safety. When it is possible, you should protect yourself from blood and blood products by using gloves and other protective gear when available.

If you would like to obtain more information on learning how to Stop the Bleeding, please visit the website www.bleedingcontrol.org

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hypertension and Kidney Disease

High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure in the United States after diabetes.

High blood pressure, also known as Hypertension, can damage blood vessels in the kidneys, reducing their ability to work properly. When the force of blood flow is high, blood vessels stretch so blood flows more easily. Eventually, this stretching scars and weakens blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the kidneys.

If the kidneys’ blood vessels are damaged, they may stop removing wastes and extra fluid from the body. Extra fluid in the blood vessels may then raise blood pressure even more, creating a dangerous cycle.

Most people with high blood pressure do not have symptoms. In rare cases, high blood pressure can cause headaches.

Kidney disease also does not have symptoms during its early stages. A person may have swelling called edema, which happens when the kidneys cannot get rid of extra fluid and salt. Edema can occur in the legs, feet, or ankles and less often in the hands or face.

Once kidney function decreases further, symptoms can include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness or feeling tired
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Sleep problems
  • Increased or decreased urination
  • Generalized itching or numbness
  • Dry skin
  • Headaches
  • Weight loss
  • Darkened skin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain

Following a healthy eating plan can help lower blood pressure.  Your health care provider may recommend a dietary approach that includes foods that are low in fat and cholesterol, dairy that is fat-free or low-fat, fish, poultry and nuts, as well as, consuming less read meat, sweets and added sugars.

If  you are experiencing symptoms and would like to speak with a physician, please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Cristina Gonclaves

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Cristina Goncalves, Coordinator in Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Occupational Health Services Department. Cristina has been with the hospital for seven years. She started her career four years ago at Jamaica Hospital as a switchboard operator before moving to her current position three years ago.

Cristina is a native of Queens. She grew up in the Jamaica area and attended Our Lady of the Cenacle elementary school, St. Agnes Academic High School and then John Jay College of Criminal Justice where she obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Forensic Psychology in 2013. Cristina has three children, two girls and a boy whom she enjoys spending all of her free time with. They enjoy going as a family to museums, parks, the movies and just doing anything that is adventurous. Two of Cristina’s favorite vacation destinations are Portugal and Myrtle Beach.

On Saturdays and Sundays Cristina enjoys her kick-boxing sessions. She also likes to eat different types of foods especially sushi, as well as Spanish and Indian food. She finds listening to Latin music very relaxing and also likes Disney songs.

Cristina feels that  working at Jamaica Hospital is like being with family. She finds everyone to be very considerate of one another and she looks forward to having many more positive experiences here. Her long term goal is to return to school to become a social worker which she believes would be a very fulfilling career. We are fortunate to have her as a member of our team and look forward to her being with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Organ Donor Day

There are currently over 120,000 people in the United States who are awaiting an organ donation that could potentially save their lives.

It all started in 1998 when the Saturn company joined together with the United Auto Workers and supported by the U.S. Department of Health to recognize the need. Every year February 14th is a day designated as National Organ Donor Day that serves to make the public aware of the importance of how an organ donation can save a life for someone else.

There are different types of donations:
• Organs
• Tissue
• Marrow
• Platelets
• Blood

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center supports organ donation. To find out how you can register to become an organ donor, go to www.liveonny.org  for more information.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.