Employee Spotlight – Margaret Novoa

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Margaret Novoa, clerical assistant to the manager of MediSys East New York.

Margaret grew up in South Ozone Park and attended school at St. Teresa of Avila. Her family moved to Brooklyn during her high school years where she attended Erasmus Hall High School and after graduating from high school she went on to study at Linden State College in Vermont.

Margaret began her career at Jamaica Hospital 35 years ago in the Emergency Department before moving on to the Department of Family Medicine and eventually to her current position in MediSys East New York.

In her free time, Margaret enjoys spending time with her son and daughter, her three grandchildren and other members of her family. Many of the people that she has worked with at the hospital over the years have become like family to her and she cherishes these friendships. Margaret enjoys reading, traveling, walking, and cooking. Margaret believes strongly in giving back to the community and she began a charity in honor of her mother, Carmen Novoa, that benefits single mothers and their children.

Margaret takes great pride in working at Jamaica Hospital for many reasons. Having grown up in this community she feels good about being able to give back to the neighborhood that gave so much to her. She feels very fortunate to work with people who look out for one another and from whom she has learned so much. Margaret looks forward to continuing to work at Jamaica Hospital and to contributing to the well-being of others. We are very happy to have her as a member of the Jamaica Hospital family.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Wearing Socks is Important

We are coming in to the warmer months of the year and many of us will be dressing more casually. Either as a fashion statement or as a way to be comfortable, some people will chose to wear shoes without wearing socks. Socks provide a bit of cushioning so that our feet don’t rub directly against the lining of the shoe, and they also help to keep them dry.  When feet are exposed to prolonged moisture, there is a potential for foot fungus to develop. Foot fungus thrives in places that are warm, dark and moist, which is exactly what the environment inside of a shoe is.
One of the easiest ways to prevent foot fungus is to wear socks whenever you wear shoes.  This will help to keep the feet dry. Keeping the feet clean will also help because it will remove any bacteria and dead skin that can potentially lead to an infection.
If you develop a fungal foot infection, especially a fungal infection, it will be important to see a podiatrist who can diagnose the condition properly and prescribe an appropriate medication. To make an appointment with a podiatrist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Springtime is Allergy Season

The calendar tells us that Spring is here. Soon the flowers will start to bloom, trees will start to blossom and lawns will be waking up from the long winter.  We will also be spending  more time outdoors. With the beginning of Spring comes allergy season and all the discomfort some of us experience. It is estimated that 30 percent of Americans suffer from allergies.
With the new technology and equipment that is available at Jamaica Hospital, testing of a small sample of blood serum IgE, can determine if a person is allergic to any of the hundreds of known allergens. This quick testing will help to determine what course of treatment to begin.  Another advantage of this testing is that it can be ordered by any physician, as opposed to traditional testing ordered and performed by an allergist.  A correct diagnosis leads to a more accurate treatment plan.
Historically, allergy testing was performed by specialists in the field of Allergy and Immunology. Often times this involved performing skin tests and then monitoring the results. Now this whole process can be performed by a physician through a simple blood serum test and Jamaica Hospital is now one of the few hospitals in New York City that is offering this new and exciting technology.
Often times, allergy symptoms are similar to other health conditions such as colds and sinus infections. Allergies typically do not cause fever but they can cause itchiness, eye discomfort and a runny nose. It is important to determine the causes of these symptom before treating the symptoms. People tend to purchase over the counter medications over the counter to treat their symptoms, but they may not be treating the correct cause of their discomfort.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss having  allergies, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

April is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Each year thousands of lives are lost due to someone who is not fully concentrating on the road while operating a motor vehicle. A few of the things that people should avoid while driving include:

  • Texting
  • Eating
  • Adjusting a radio or GPS
  • Talking on the phone
  • Personal grooming

Dr. Geoffrey Doughlin, Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Jamaica Hospital, explains in this video why distracted driving is so dangerous.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Katiria Martinez

This month we are pleased to shine our employee spotlight on Katiria Martinez, an Ambulatory Care Representative in the Emergency Department since 2014.
Katiria currently lives in Brooklyn but grew up in the Richmond Hill section of Queens and is very familiar with the area surrounding Jamaica Hospital. According to Katiria, working in the Emergency Department is dynamic and can be very rewarding. She is extremely happy when she can make someone’s day more pleasant , especially when they are facing very stressful moments in the hospital emergency room. She finds it very interesting meeting people from all walks of life and from all over the world.  Katiria states “I am very fortunate to be working with a great group of people. Everyone helps one another which makes it a very good work environment.”  She feels very fortunate to have a supervisor who encourages her to be the best that she can be and who teaches her so many important skills. These are all reasons that she enjoys coming to work every day.
When Katiria isn’t at work she enjoys spending time with her children, two sons and a daughter. She has a fondness for all kinds of outdoor activities such as going camping, hiking, spending time in the woods,  and also spending time at the beach.  Summer is her favorite time because she enjoys warm weather and it is the best time of year to be outdoors. One of the sports she enjoys is archery.  She also enjoys traveling to new places and she is hoping to visit Panama on her next vacation.
Katiria believes in living life to the fullest. When she is at work she strives to make each day interesting and to make a positive difference in the lives of the people she interacts with. When she is home she feels the same way, her family is the most important part of her life and she enjoys the time she spends with them. Katiria  is always trying to make each day a great day for everyone she meets.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Orthodontics

More and more people, both children and adults are seeking orthodontic treatment today. Having well aligned teeth is not only important for a nice smile but also for proper dental health.

The importance of having healthy and aligned teeth dates back as early as 1000 BC. The ancient Egyptians and the Etruscans were using material made from animal intestines to move teeth into better alignment. An ancient Roman scientist discovered that by applying finger pressure on teeth for an extended period of time over the course of months would help move teeth into a new position.

The first more modern practice of orthodontics was documented in the early 1770’s. A French surgeon dentist named Pierre Fauchard came up with the concept of the “Bandeau” which was a horseshoe shaped device that gave the mouth a natural arch. Later on in the early 1800’s Francois Delabarre invented the wire crib that was placed on the teeth and help move them into better alignment. In the mid 1800’s dentists began to realize that the jaw and the teeth would have to be aligned simultaneously and this was accomplished by using tiny rubber tubing and wire cribs together.

In the early 1900’s, we entered the era of orthodontics that we are more familiar with today. Back then, dentists would wrap different materials depending on their preference (ivory, wood, copper, or zinc and later on gold or silver) and connect them with bands that helped move the teeth into the desired position. In the 1970’s stainless steel was more widely used and this had the advantage of being less costly and also more flexible than the other materials used previously.

In the late 1990’s, orthodontics changed with the introduction of the invisible braces. In addition to brackets that were placed on the inside of people’s teeth to make it more aestically appealing, clear retainers were also being used which would help to align teeth.

To schedule an appointment with a dentist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-6980.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

March is National Nutrition Month

National Nutrition Month, founded by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, actually started in 1973 as just a week-long event but because of the public’s growing interest in the topic, it was expanded in 1980 to a month long event. The objective of this observance is to promote healthy eating habits,  and encourage physical activity. The theme for 2018 is “Go Further With Food”. It’s message includes:
• Encouraging a healthy eating style with a variety of foods
• Home cooking with healthy ingredients
• Eating meals in healthy amounts
• Including physical activity into a daily routine
• Maintaining a health weight
If you feel that you need to acquire better eating habits and would like some professional assistance, please speak to your physician who will be able to refer you to a nutritionist. To schedule an appointment  with a physician at Jamaica Hospital please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Save Your Vision Month

March is Save Your Vision Month
How often should you have your vison checked?
A) Every year
B) Every two years
C) Every three years
D) Only when something is wrong
According to the American Optometric Association a healthy person should have a regular eye exam once a year. People who have any conditions that may affect their eyesight, for example diabetes, glaucoma, macula-degeneration, should be examined more frequently.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-5900

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Seatbelts Save Lives

One of the best ways to prevent an injury while riding in an automobile is to use a seatbelt. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), using a seat belt properly can reduce the risk of crash injuries by 50 percent. Seatbelts are estimated to save almost 13,000 lives in the United States each year.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention more than half of the people killed in car crashes were not restrained at the time of the crash.

When a motor vehicle comes to a sudden stop, the occupants of that vehicle come to a stop as well, but not always simultaneously.  When the occupants are not wearing their seatbelts and the vehicle comes to a sudden stop, they can be thrown forward. This often results in either people hitting the windshield of the vehicle or being thrown from the car if the impact is forceful enough.

How does a seatbelt work? A seatbelt when worn properly will disperse the motor vehicle’s stopping force across a person’s chest and pelvis. Seatbelts are usually made from material that has a little elasticity, so the stopping action isn’t as severe. The main objective of the seat belt is to prevent a person from making sharp impact with the windshield, the dashboard, or other rigid areas in the vehicle. By dispersing the force across the body, this will help to reduce the amount of trauma that is inflicted.

Seatbelts are only helpful when they are worn. Even though it is mandatory to wear a seatbelt in most states, there are still people who don’t always wear one. Anyone who has ever been involved in a motor vehicle accident and who was wearing a seat belt at the time will tell you that it probably saved their life. Seat belts that went across the lap started appearing in cars in the early 1960’s and were supplemented by shoulder harnesses in the late 1960’s. At first people found them to be very uncomfortable to wear but as time passed, car manufacturers were able to design the modern three point belt that is easier to use and more comfortable to wear.

Everyone should buckle up, seatbelts save lives.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Renee Card

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Renee Card, Occupational Therapist. Renee has been working at Jamaica Hospital for 25 years. She grew up in  Laurelton, Queens and still resides there today.

Renee became interested in occupational therapy while doing an internship during high school at the Rusk Institute in Manhattan. After graduating from Springfield High School she went on to get her degrees from both Queens College and York College. She pursued her career path because she discovered that she had a passion for helping people and restoring their quality of life after a major illness or trauma.

Renee enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital because of the diversity of the patients that she sees. She also loves working at Jamaica Hospital because her colleagues have become like a second family to her as they too have worked together for many years.

In her free time Renee is very active in the community. She performs missionary work with her church helping those who are less fortunate. Renee has also gone on medical missions to help people in Haiti, Belize and Liberia.

Renee enjoys traveling and has been to many places across the country and around the world. She has visited six of the seven continents and is always looking for new places to visit and learn about.

When Renee is not working, traveling or doing missionary work, she enjoys helping out in her brother’s dog grooming salon. She also has two beautiful dogs of her own that she is very proud of.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.