Safely Grilling Food Outdoors

Summertime is a popular time of year for outdoor grilling. Food that is grilled outdoors always seems to delight our family and friends, but if we don’t practice proper food safety, people could get food poisoning.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when grilling food in order to avoid food poisoning:
• Always make sure the utensils you are using are clean before and after you use them
• Keep raw food away from cooked food by using separate plates
• Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after touching uncooked food
• Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked at the right temperature
145 degrees for whole beef, pork, veal, lamb
145 degrees for fish
160 degrees for hamburgers and ground beef
165 degrees for poultry and hot dogs
• Check the date on the meat package to ensure it is fresh when you buy it
• Don’t leave raw meat or poultry out at room temperature for more than two hours
• Keep uncooked meat refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower
• After food is cooked, keep it hot until served at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter
• Wash all of the utensils used for grilling after you are done with them
• Do not partially cook food and finish it later
• Keep food out of direct sunlight
• Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked at the right temperature

• By following these simple tips, you will ensure a wonderful meal will be enjoyed by everyone.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Swimming after Eating – How Long Should You Wait ?

Is it true that people should wait 30 minutes or even an hour after eating before they go swimming ? According to some health experts,  this rule is merely a myth.  Some people will experience stomach cramps if they do anything vigorous after a meal, but moderate swimming or any type of exercise shouldn’t cause any serious side effects.
The process of eating and digestion diverts some blood away from the muscles in the arms and legs and sends it towards the stomach and the intestines to aid in digestion. In most cases there is still enough blood for all of the body parts to function normally after a meal. In extreme cases when excessive exercise begins right after a meal, cramping can occur due to lack of oxygen, but this isn’t common.
Although there is very little risk of cramping associated with going swimming right after eating, it is still better to be safe and wait.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Heel Spur

A heel spur is the term used when a bony growth appears on the underside of the calcaneous ( heel bone). It may not be painful when it is first being formed but as time progresses it can become painful.
Heel spurs typically form when there is long term, excessive pulling on the part of the heel where the plantar fascia (a band of fibrous connective tissue that runs from the heel to the toes)  attaches to the bone.  When the plantar fascia loses its elasticity due to age or injury, it exerts tension on the heel. Over time this will cause a heel spur to develop.
Risk factors and other causes of heel spurs include:
• Poorly fitting shoes
• Weight gain
• Exercising on hard surfaces
• Natural aging
• Shoes with little or no arch support
• Long periods of time spent standing
• Diabetes
The symptoms of a heel spur are described as sharp pains in the bottom of the heel  when putting your feet on the ground, especially after prolonged periods of rest. This pain usually diminishes when walking for a while, but doesn’t go away completely. It will return again when walking is resumed.
A heel spur is diagnosed definitively by performing a physical exam and an x-ray. Treatment options include stretching exercises, cold compresses to the area, using custom molded orthotics, physical therapy, localized injections of anti-inflammatory and pain medication, and taping the foot to give the muscles and tendons a rest. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be required.
If you would like to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Victoria Lampado, LMSW

This month we are proud to shine our employee spotlight on Victoria Lampado, LMSW. Victoria is a member of our Social Work Department who has been working at Jamaica Hospital for over three years. She is a native New Yorker, having grown up in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn and now residing in Kew Gardens, Queens. Victoria is a graduate of Bishop Ford High School, Brooklyn College and Columbia University where she obtained her Masters in Social Work.
Victoria was influenced by her Italian and Russian heritage which gave her a deep appreciation of the fine arts, Broadway theater and music.  She grew up listening to Italian operas, and popular singers like Frank Sinatra, Doris Day and Judy Garland thanks to the influence of her father who shared his love of everything Italian with his family. In her free time, Victoria enjoys cooking, especially Italian food, crocheting, and spending time with her family and friends. She is very proud of her late father who was a World War II veteran who instilled in her a sense of compassion and caring for those who are less fortunate. She also has a rescue dog, a Shitzu named Goldie, who she has given a good home to.
Before coming to Jamaica Hospital Victoria worked as a social worker in a wide range of professional settings. There are several reasons why she gives for enjoying working at Jamaica Hospital more than anyplace she has worked previously. She enjoys the international diversity of both the patients we treat, and the people who work here. Victoria feels that though there are challenges with the population we work with, the entire team comes together to meet them and find ways to accomplish their goals. Every patient is treated with respect and dignity and the number one goal is to always do the right thing for the patient. “Jamaica Hospital has great energy and great people who care about our patients” she states. She also pointed out that prior to coming to work at Jamaica Hospital, she herself had been a patient at the hospital on two occasions and she was very impressed with the excellent level of care she received.
Victoria hopes that the work she is doing will have a positive impact on people’s lives and we think she is already well on her way to accomplishing that goal.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pool Safety

The weather is warming up and people will be looking for ways to keep cool. One way that has always been popular during the warm summer months is swimming in a pool. Every year there are countless accidents and also fatalities at or near swimming pools. Many of which  could have been avoided had precautions been taken.
Safety Tips to follow:
• Never leave children unattended near a pool
• Only swim when there is a lifeguard present
• Every pool should have proper drain covers
• Pools should have alarms and proper fencing
• Keep the pool clean
• There should be no diving allowed in pools that are shallow
• Never swim alone
• There should be no horseplay in or near a pool
• Do not swim under the influence of alcohol or drugs
• Do not swim in a thunderstorm
• It is a good idea to give children swimming lessons before the start of the summer
• Children who don’t know how to swim should be given flotation devices to wear
There are many organizations around the country that offer swimming lessons for children and adults of all ages. If you don’t know how to swim, look into getting some lessons before heading out to the pool. You will have a good time and you will also be a lot safer this summer.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

June is Cataract Awareness Month

The American Academy of Ophthalmology has designated June as Cataract Awareness Month. The purpose of this designation is to help educate the public on what cataracts are and how to treat them once they are diagnosed.
Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye. This will result in blurry vision, and since less light is being transmitted, objects will appear darker as well.
It is estimated that 25 million people in the United States age 40 and older will be diagnosed with a cataract, and by the time people reach the age of 80, more than half of the population of the United States will be affected with the disease.
Risk factors for developing cataracts include:
• Age
• Diabetes
• Smoking
• Prolonged exposure to sunlight
• Obesity
• High blood pressure
• Hereditary factors
• Prior eye injuries
Cataracts are classified by what causes them. Age is the biggest factor, followed by eye trauma, congenital causes and secondary to taking certain medications like steroids.
There are a few ways to lower the risk of developing cataracts, but they may not be completely successful.
Wearing sunglasses when outdoors
A diet rich in vitamin C foods
Avoiding smoking
Treatment for cataracts involves a surgical procedure which removes the old lens of the eye  and replacing it with a synthetic one. It is a very common procedure and considered relatively safe. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

World No Tobacco Day

Since 1987 the World Health Organization has recognized May 31st as a day to bring awareness around the world of the harmful effects of tobacco. This year the focus is on tobacco and cardiovascular diseases.
The risks of using tobacco are well documented, however many people around the world are not fully aware of the dangers.  There is a very strong link between tobacco use and heart disease, circulatory problems and stroke.
Coronary vascular diseases are one of the world’s leading causes of death.  Tobacco use is the second leading cause of these types of diseases, hypertension being the leading cause. With all of the knowledge we have about the harmful effects of tobacco use, there are still some who have not received the message and as a result, more than 7 million people die each year from the effects of tobacco.
A few of the initiatives that the World Health Organization is trying to implement to inform people about tobacco’s harmful effects are:
• Increase public knowledge of the risks of smoking and second hand smoke
• Encourage healthcare providers to speak to their patients about the hazards of tobacco
• Encourage governmental  support for educational programs
• Seek ways to promote smoke free zones in buildings and public spaces
• Increase taxes on tobacco products
• Make it more difficult to purchase tobacco products
• Ban tobacco advertising
If you use tobacco products and would like to quit, speak to your provider. Jamaica Hospital offers a tobacco cessation program  to help you. Please call 718-206-8494 to learn more.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight – Yolanda Torres Jacobs

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Security Officer Yolanda Torres Jacobs.
Yolanda is a true New Yorker who finds the city a great place to live. She grew up in Bedford Stuyvesant Brooklyn and attended Grover Cleveland High School. Her home now is in Queens Village which is both convenient to travel to work and also close enough to many of her family members. She grew up in a very loving family, with two brothers , a sister and many aunts, uncles and cousins.
Yolanda has been working in the security field for 25 years. She has been at Jamaica Hospital since 2014 and prior to that she worked in security at JFK and LaGuardia Airports. She also has several years of experience working in customer relations positions which taught her many lessons that she uses when dealing with the public. Yolanda enjoys her job and finds it rewarding being able to interact with our patients, visitors and staff. She brings a positive approach to her job and does her best to make sure that everyone she encounters has a pleasant experience.
Yolanda grew up with many kinds of pets. She has had dogs, birds and even snakes. She and her husband  have a beautiful aquarium in their home and she finds it very relaxing to watch the fish.
In her free time, Yolanda enjoys spending time with her family. Whenever she gets a chance she enjoys traveling with her husband to places near and far. She also enjoys cooking, eating in all kinds of restaurants, bike riding, going to the movies, dancing, and spending time with her family who she adores.
Yolanda credits her family with giving her an outgoing personality and the enjoyment she gets from interacting with people in a positive way each and every day.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Intermittent Fasting – Is It Safe ?

People who are trying to lose weight will try almost anything if they think it will help them. One method that has been around for centuries, but now is becoming very popular, is intermittent fasting, the voluntary forgoing of food for a set amount of time each day in the hopes of losing excess weight. The question that comes to mind is, is it safe?
One of the effects on the body of intermittent fasting is believed to be an increase in the sensitivity to insulin. When this occurs, the body tends to have better control of glucose levels and will be less likely to build up fat. Prolonged intermittent fasting however can have detrimental side effects on the storage of glucose in the cells, releasing byproducts of this breakdown into the circulatory system at dangerous levels.
If a person decides to try intermittent fasting as a short term method of losing weight, another thing to be careful of is overeating at the end of each day’s fast. This can overload the body’s ability to digest this food properly and cause stomach pains. Short term intermittent fasting is generally safe for people who are in good health.
Most types of fasting is not recommended for the following people:
• Pregnant women
• People with diabetes
• Anyone who is underweight already
• Women who are breastfeeding
• Children under 18 years of age
• Anyone who is elderly shouldn’t fast
Some of the risks of going on a long term intermittent fasting diet are that since you are consuming less nutrients, the metabolism slows down. Once you start eating again, the body may actually gain more weight than you originally lost. The body requires vitamins, minerals and other nutrients in order to function properly. When these are absent from the diet, a person can experience headaches, fatigue, dehydration, and dizziness. It is also possible to see loss of muscle mass if a person fasts for too long a period of time. In severe cases it can be life threatening.
Whether you are considering intermittent fasting or any other form of weight loss program, always consult with a physician first to see if it is safe for you. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

May is Healthy Vision Month

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 90 million Americans over the age of 40 have eye problems. That is about 60 percent of the population. May has been designated as Healthy Vision Month to bring attention to our eyes and the problems that we can encounter. While prevention is always the best route to follow, treating eye problems early, should they occur, can prevent further harm to our vision.
One of the reasons people neglect their eyes is because if they don’t think there is a problem, they aren’t going to get checked. While older adults, especially women,  are usually the group that experiences more age related vision problems, it is becoming more evident that school age children are also experiencing vision problems. Children who can’t see well probably have difficulty reading, and this can affect them in school.
Many eye problems can be traced back to family history. While not a guarantee that someone will experience an issue with their vision if a parent had an eye problem, it certainly is something to be mindful of.  Certain chronic illnesses, like diabetes can also predispose people to vision problems.
It is important to protect your eyes from things that can harm them. Doctors recommend wearing sunglasses if you are going to be outdoors during daylight hours for prolonged periods of time. It is also recommended to wear safety glasses if you are going to be working in hazardous environments. Many of us spend long periods of time looking at our computer screens. To avoid problems we should follow the 20-20-20 rule. Every twenty minutes look away from the screen and focus on something twenty feet away for twenty seconds. This will help to prevent the eyes from getting tired and the muscles of the eyes from becoming weak.
Other ways to protect your vision include:
• Regular comprehensive eye exams
• Proper diet (with foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids and dark leafy vegetables)
• Quit smoking or don’t start
• Maintain a proper weight
• Wash hands before placing or removing contact lenses
The National Eye Institute recommends a regular comprehensive dilated eye exam be performed on a regular basis, usually once a year. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.