Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Service Wants to Educate the Public on How to “Stop the Bleed”

What would you if you encountered a traumatic event where someone was bleeding and no medical professional was immediately available? Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Division wants to make you aware of a national campaign called “Stop the Bleed” that can help in these types of situations.

Uncontrolled bleeding is the number one cause of preventable death from trauma.  Stop the Bleed is a national awareness campaign that was initiated by the White House in 2015 to bring attention to this very serious situation. It is a collaboration of a number of Federal agencies, non- profit organizations and corporations. The purpose of this campaign is to teach as many people as possible what to do when faced with a bleeding emergency before professional help arrives. When an emergency arises often the first people on the scene will be non-medical professionals without much training in first aid. This campaign serves to train as many people as possible on what to do until help arrives.

These are the ABC’s to follow when someone is bleeding: :

  • A – Alert
  • Either call 9-1-1 or have another bystander make the call
  • B – Bleeding
  • Find the source of the bleed
  • C – Compress
  • Apply pressure to stop the bleeding. Cover the wound with a clean cloth and apply pressure with both hands, apply a tourniquet when possible, or pack the wound with gauze or a clean cloth

In addition it is important to assess the situation so that you can ensure your own safety. When it is possible, you should protect yourself from blood and blood products by using gloves and other protective gear when available.

If you would like to obtain more information on learning how to Stop the Bleeding, please visit the website www.bleedingcontrol.org

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Hypertension and Kidney Disease

High blood pressure is the second leading cause of kidney failure in the United States after diabetes.

High blood pressure, also known as Hypertension, can damage blood vessels in the kidneys, reducing their ability to work properly. When the force of blood flow is high, blood vessels stretch so blood flows more easily. Eventually, this stretching scars and weakens blood vessels throughout the body, including those in the kidneys.

If the kidneys’ blood vessels are damaged, they may stop removing wastes and extra fluid from the body. Extra fluid in the blood vessels may then raise blood pressure even more, creating a dangerous cycle.

Most people with high blood pressure do not have symptoms. In rare cases, high blood pressure can cause headaches.

Kidney disease also does not have symptoms during its early stages. A person may have swelling called edema, which happens when the kidneys cannot get rid of extra fluid and salt. Edema can occur in the legs, feet, or ankles and less often in the hands or face.

Once kidney function decreases further, symptoms can include:

  • Appetite loss
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness or feeling tired
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Sleep problems
  • Increased or decreased urination
  • Generalized itching or numbness
  • Dry skin
  • Headaches
  • Weight loss
  • Darkened skin
  • Muscle cramps
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chest pain

Following a healthy eating plan can help lower blood pressure.  Your health care provider may recommend a dietary approach that includes foods that are low in fat and cholesterol, dairy that is fat-free or low-fat, fish, poultry and nuts, as well as, consuming less read meat, sweets and added sugars.

If  you are experiencing symptoms and would like to speak with a physician, please call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Cristina Gonclaves

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Cristina Goncalves, Coordinator in Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Occupational Health Services Department. Cristina has been with the hospital for seven years. She started her career four years ago at Jamaica Hospital as a switchboard operator before moving to her current position three years ago.

Cristina is a native of Queens. She grew up in the Jamaica area and attended Our Lady of the Cenacle elementary school, St. Agnes Academic High School and then John Jay College of Criminal Justice where she obtained a Bachelor’s Degree in Forensic Psychology in 2013. Cristina has three children, two girls and a boy whom she enjoys spending all of her free time with. They enjoy going as a family to museums, parks, the movies and just doing anything that is adventurous. Two of Cristina’s favorite vacation destinations are Portugal and Myrtle Beach.

On Saturdays and Sundays Cristina enjoys her kick-boxing sessions. She also likes to eat different types of foods especially sushi, as well as Spanish and Indian food. She finds listening to Latin music very relaxing and also likes Disney songs.

Cristina feels that  working at Jamaica Hospital is like being with family. She finds everyone to be very considerate of one another and she looks forward to having many more positive experiences here. Her long term goal is to return to school to become a social worker which she believes would be a very fulfilling career. We are fortunate to have her as a member of our team and look forward to her being with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Organ Donor Day

There are currently over 120,000 people in the United States who are awaiting an organ donation that could potentially save their lives.

It all started in 1998 when the Saturn company joined together with the United Auto Workers and supported by the U.S. Department of Health to recognize the need. Every year February 14th is a day designated as National Organ Donor Day that serves to make the public aware of the importance of how an organ donation can save a life for someone else.

There are different types of donations:
• Organs
• Tissue
• Marrow
• Platelets
• Blood

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center supports organ donation. To find out how you can register to become an organ donor, go to www.liveonny.org  for more information.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The History of Diabetes Testing

Diabetes was recognized as far back as 1500 BC by Egyptian scientists. In 600 BC scientists later noted that ants seemed to be particularly drawn to the urine of people with diabetes. The earliest documented diagnosis of the disease was during the middle ages when Chinese, Indian and Egyptian scientists tested the urine of people thought to have diabetes by tasting it for a sweet distinctive taste.

The first clinical exam for diabetes was performed by a doctor named Karl Tommer in 1841 who tested urine with acid hydrolysis which broke up the disaccharides into monosaccharides and then after the addition of other chemicals results in a reaction forming if sugar is present.

In 1850 Hermann von Fehling was able to expand on Trommer’s work to quantify the results. Later in the 19th century, Frederick Pavy developed tablets that when added to the urine would show if there was glucose in the urine. In 1907 Stanley Benedict was able to refine Fehling’s test. In 1913 Ivar Bang discovered a way to test the blood for glucose.

In the 1940’s urine test strips were developed that would change colors depending on the amount of glucose was in the urine. In more modern times,  test strips were introduced in 1964 that could check the blood for sugar and the first glucometer that was able to test blood samples for elevated sugar was developed in 1970. Another test for diabetes was developed in the mid 1970’s and it tested for hemoglobin A1c.

Glucose testing has now progressed to the point where blood sugar can be determined by a sensor that can measure it through the skin, with no need to take a drop of blood.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Nicole Santucci, RD CDN

This month we are very happy to shine our employee spotlight on Nicole Santucci, a nutritionist who has been working at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for almost four years.

Nicole grew up on Long Island in North Valley Stream and attended the Willow Road Elementary School, Valley Stream North High School and is a graduate of Syracuse University. She is currently enrolled at Stony Brook University where she will be completing her Master’s degree in May of 2019.

Nicole became interested in nutrition while taking a course at Syracuse University. Having been diagnosed as a Type I Diabetic when she was nine years old, eating healthy became a way of life she needed to adhere to. Her parents were very supportive and she was brought up as any other normal child would be, learning how to manage her diabetes successfully through proper eating habits, exercise and taking her medication. Because she has lived with diabetes for most of her life and learned so much from nutritionists who guided her, she felt it would be a natural fit as a career choice for her. She enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital for many reasons. Her department works well together as a team which is very important. From an educational standpoint she feels that the diverse population of patients will allow her to learn about many different cultures and provide her with invaluable learning experiences.

Nicole has very family strong ties to the Richmond Hill community and to the hospital itself. Not only was her father and many of her relatives born at Jamaica Hospital, but her uncle Thomas Santucci Jr was the Chairman of the Department of Medicine for over 30 years.

In her free time, Nicole enjoys cooking, especially Italian food, going to the movies, running when the weather permits and going to plays in Manhattan. She enjoys traveling and has been to many places both in Europe and the Caribbean. One of her favorite cities is Prague because of its beauty and her mother’s family came from there so she feels a strong connection to it. She enjoys spending time with her dog, a corgi hound mix named Pebbles who is a rescue. Nicole is engaged to be married in the Fall of 2019 so wedding planning are another activity that she is enjoying.

We are fortunate to have Nicole as part of our team of nutritionists at Jamaica Hospital and thank her for playing such an important role in our patients’ treatment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Taking Zinc Beneficial for Treating a Cold ?

Using zinc is one of the many home remedies people take when they feel like they have a common cold. Those who use it believe that it helps to shorten the duration of the cold and even lessen its symptoms.

The common cold is caused by the rhinovirus. This virus enters the body through the nasal passageway and the throat and multiplies rapidly once it is there.
The theory behind taking zinc is that it helps to prevent the virus from multiplying once it is in the body, thereby potentially shortening the duration of the cold. It also plays an important role in the body’s ability to resist infection and to help tissue repair.

The best way to take zinc is in lozenge form. It is recommended that the lozenge contain 13 to 23 milligrams of zinc and no more than four be taken per day, and not for more than four or five days. Taking too much zinc can actually suppress the immune system and can cause an upset stomach and give you a metallic taste in your mouth. While zinc is also available as a throat spray, it has side effects such as loss of the ability to smell.

Increasing the daily intake of zinc may help to prevent a cold.  Some foods where zinc  is found include:
• Shellfish
• Beans
• Dairy products
• Red meat
• Nuts

It is important to note that drinking coffee, tea or taking certain medications can inhibit the absorption of zinc by the intestines.

It is a good idea to speak with your physician before taking it to make sure that is safe for you. If you would like to be seen by a doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center you may call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Having An Annual Physical Exam Important ?

It’s the beginning of a new year which is a perfect time to make a promise to take bettercare of yourself.  What better way to do this than by scheduling an appointment for a regular medical check-up. Even if you feel fine, it is a good idea to see your medical doctor to ensure that you don’t have any underlying health issues. The American Medical Association is now recommending that physical exams be performed once every five years for people between 18 and 40 years of age and every three years after the age of 40, as long as there are no chronic illnesses that require  more frequent check-ups.  After the age of 55, an annual exam is probably a good idea.

There are many reasons that having a physical exam is something that everyone should make time to do.  These include:

• Prevention of illnesses
• Monitoring the risk of chronic disease
• Identify illnesses that don’t have symptoms
• Monitoring your weight, blood pressure, heart rate, and basic body chemistry
• Adjusting your lifestyle to best suit your rage
• Keeping an ongoing relationship with your physician

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Will Your New Year’s Resolution Be For 2019 ?

Some popular resolutions that people be make for 2019 are to:

• Lose weight
• Get organized
• Spend less
• Quit smoking
• Fall in love

The percentage of people who make New Year’s resolutions is about 45% of the population. People in their twenties tend to be more successful at maintaining their resolutions as compared to people over the age of 50. By the end of the first month 65% of the people are still doing a good job of keeping to their resolution, however by the end of six months that number drops to around 44%.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Flu Season Precautions

We are in the month of December and cases of flu are being reported by physician’s offices and hospital emergency rooms.  None of us want to catch the flu so it is a good idea to take some preventative measures that can help us to stay healthy.

Here are a few of the ways we can prevent getting the flu:

• Everyone who is six months of age and older should get the vaccine every year
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Wash your hands frequently with soap and water.
• Keep a hand sanitizer handy for the times soap and water are not available.
• Avoid touching your hands to your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Whenever possible, disinfect surfaces that are frequently used by others such as tables and chairs.
• Clean your drinking glasses and dishes in hot water and with soap
• Keep your immune system healthy by eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly and getting enough sleep every night
• Tobacco can suppress the immune system, so it is highly recommended to quit smoking.

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center to discuss the flu vaccine and other ways to stay healthy, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.