Power Napping

It has been proven that taking a power nap during the day has many benefits. A nap can lower blood pressure and also reduce the level of stress.

Research has shown that the benefits of a midday power nap are determined by the length of the time a person spends napping. A nap that lasts 20 minutes will help alertness and will also increase motor function. Naps that last 30 to 60 minutes will improve decision-making skills, and a nap that lasts 60 to 90 minutes will improve the ability to solve creative problems. Most people will only be able to take a short nap. A person who naps longer than 20 or 30 minutes runs the risk of waking up and feeling groggy.

If your typical day starts at 7:00 AM and you go to bed for the night around 11:00 PM, then napping between 1:30 and 3:00 PM is when you will benefit from a power nap the most.

If you are having difficulty getting a good night’s sleep, specialists at Jamaica Hospital’s Sleep Center can conduct sleep studies to help determine the causes of your sleep deprivation. To schedule an appointment for an evaluation, please call 718-206-5916

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

 

The month of September has been designated as National Prostate Cancer Awareness

Month to bring attention to this very common form of cancer that affects so many men. Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in men and is the second leading cancer related cause of death in men. Although it is not known exactly what causes prostate cancer some risk factors for developing it are:

  •  Older age (more than 65% of prostate cancers are diagnosed in men older than 65)
  • Race (African-American men are 60% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men)
  • Family history (having a father or brother with prostate cancer)
  • Obesity

The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive system that produces a fluid that mixes with sperm and other fluids during ejaculation. It sits just below the bladder and is normally about the side of a walnut.

Prostate cancer, especially in its early stages, may not have any symptoms. When symptoms are present they may include difficulty starting urination, less force to the stream of urine, dribbling at the end of urination, needing to urinate frequently, urinating frequently at night, pain while urinating, blood in the urine or semen, difficulty starting or maintaining an erection, pain with ejaculation, pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, pelvis and upper thighs, or unintended weight loss.

When screening is done there are two tests that are available. The available tests are a digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.  To perform a digital rectal exam your doctor uses a gloved finger, inserted a few inches into your rectum, to check your prostate gland.  A prostate-specific antigen test is a blood test that measures the level of PSA in your blood.  Many men who have prostate cancer have elevated levels of PSA, however PSA can also be elevated for less serious causes such as prostate enlargement or infection.

Further testing is needed to diagnose cancer. Additional tests that your doctor may recommend to diagnose cancer include an ultrasound of the prostate and a biopsy of the prostate.  A biopsy is when a small piece of the prostate is removed to look for abnormal cells.

Treatment of prostate cancer depends on many factors including your age, your overall health and the growth and spread of the cancer when it is diagnosed. Some men who have slow growing tumors may not need treatment right away and some may never need treatment.  Other types of prostate cancer are aggressive and can quickly spread to other parts of the body making treatment difficult.  Common treatment options include watchful waiting or expectant management (regular testing and checkups to assess for new signs or symptoms), radiation therapy (high-energy x-rays used to kill cancer cells), chemotherapy, surgery (having the prostate gland removed) and hormone therapy.

To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital to discuss a prostate cancer screening, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is National Traumatic Brain Injury Month

September is recognized as National Traumatic Brain Injury Awareness Month. The main purpose of this observance is to raise awareness about traumatic brain injuries and how to recognize, prevent, and treat it one if it occurs.

The most common type of head injury is called a concussion, which is known as a mild traumatic brain injury. These can happen to anyone, at any age that has experienced a blow to the head. Signs and symptoms of a concussion can include:

  • Headache
  • Blurry vision
  • Nausea
  • Feeling tired
  • Anxiety
  • Sadness
  • Difficulty thinking clearly
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Loss of consciousness

In most cases, people will recover from a concussion in a week to ten days, with adults usually recovering faster than children. While many times traumatic brain injuries can’t be prevented because they are due to an accident, there are a few things a person can do to protect themselves:

  • Anyone who participates in a sport that has physical contact should wear proper head gear
  • When riding in a car everyone should wear a seat belt
  • Helmets should always be worn when riding a bicycle
  • People who are prone to falling should walk with the assistance of a cane, a walker or have someone with them for assistance.

If you or someone you know experiences a head trauma, it is advised that they to be seen immediately by a physician or be taken to the nearest emergency room.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Louise Senior

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Louise Senior, a telephone operator at the Trump Pavilion For Nursing and Rehabilitation, and perhaps better known as the woman who is always smiling at the reception desk in the lobby. Louise started working at the nursing home in 1994. She is extremely proud to tell everyone that five generations of her family have been affiliated with the facility. Her grandmother was a patient and her mother, her daughter and her granddaughter have all worked there.

Louise was born in the Bronx but she really considers herself a native of Queens having moved to Queens Village at the age of eight.  Her early school years were spent at Public School 98 in Bayside, the Louis Pasteur Middle School and Cardozzo High School. Currently, she resides in St. Albans.

Her personal story began at Trump Pavilion when she was 13 years old and would visit her mom who worked there. Years later she experienced a fall and her doctor recommended that she receive physical therapy.  On Louise’s last day of therapy, she happened to see the Director of Communication who asked if she would be interested in coming to work for the facility.  That was 24 years ago and she is still very happy that she said yes to the offer.

Louise feels very fortunate to be working with a wonderful team of people. She enjoys interacting with the patients, their families, and all of her colleagues. She is very proud of the work that she does and feels like she is making a difference in the lives of others.

When Louise is not working she enjoys spending time with her family. She has four granddaughters who she spends a lot of time with. Louise likes to listen to music, especially R&B and she has a passion for cooking all different types of food. Everyone who knows Louise will tell you about her warm personality. She is the nice lady who greets people as they enter with a smile.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Mourning the Loss of a Pet

Losing a loved one is one of the hardest experiences we can have. For most people, a pet is like a member of the family. They love us unconditionally and over the course of our lives and theirs, will give us countless hours of joy and happiness. When a pet passes on, it can be devastating. It is very normal to grieve for the loss of a pet in the same way as we would for anyone else in our lives that we love.

Some of the ways we can handle the loss of a pet:

  • Allow yourself time to mourn
  • Think back on all the memories you and your pet created together
  • Try to continue with your life and your daily routine
  • Allow others to offer their condolences
  • Meditation
  • Write a letter to your pet, hold a memorial service, put some items of the pet in a special place in your home.
  • Seek professional help to speak about your feelings

If you would like to schedule an appointment with a mental health therapist, please call 718-206-7160.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ingrown Toe Nails

An ingrown toe nail occurs when the corner or the edge of a nail curves into the skin causing pain, redness, swelling and potentially an infection.

The reasons a toe nail can become ingrown include:
• Cutting the nail too short
• Cutting the nails at improper angle
• Wearing shoes that are too tight
• Nails that curve by themselves   in to  the skin
• Banging the toe into a hard surface.

While we can’t always avoid getting an ingrown toe nail, there are a few things that we can do that will help lessen the chances of it occurring. A few tips to help avoid ingrown nails are to wear comfortable shoes that aren’t tight fitting, keep toe nails trimmed straight across, don’t let toe nails grow too long, and check your feet every day for signs of trouble.

Infected ingrown toe nails can be very painful. They will usually be accompanied by the presence of pus and the toe may feel warm. If you suspect that you have an infected ingrown toe nail, you must see a podiatrist as soon as possible. They may have to remove the piece of nail that is causing the infection and will probably prescribe an antibiotic to fight the infection. If left untreated, the infection can spread to the rest of the foot and beyond. People with diabetes and poor circulation must be extra careful in these situations.

If a toe nail becomes ingrown, it will be necessary to have it treated professionally. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a podiatrist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

August is Children’s Eye Health and Safety Month

Traditionally, the month of August is when children around the United States starting getting prepared to return to school. Often this will require them to visit their pediatricians for physical exams and vaccinations. One of the most important exams is an eye exam.

The American Optometric Association recommends that children get their first eye check-up when they are six months old. They should receive another check-up at the age of three, and again when they are either five or six. After the age of six, children should have their eyes examined every two years unless they wear contact lenses or glasses which require annual visits to an eye doctor. It is also recommended that your child visit an eye doctor if they exhibit signs and symptoms of a vision disorder. These include:

• Lack of interest in reading
• Not able to see things far away
• Constant tilting of the head
• Squinting when watching TV
• Frequent blinking and rubbing of the eyes
• Seeing double
• Holding a book close to the face
• An eye that wanders
• Covering one eye
• Inability to stay focused on an object

Eye health and eye health are very important. If you would like to schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Celebrates Breast Feeding Week

Today Jamaica Hospital Medical Center hosted a baby shower for women in our community in celebration of World Breastfeeding Week. Our lactation consultants along with special guests spoke to moms-to-be about the importance of breastfeeding and the many health benefits it provides.

Each year, August first to seventh is designated World Breastfeeding Week to encourage breastfeeding around the world and improve the health of babies.

World Breastfeeding Week was created 26 years ago by the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action (WABA) to promote the health benefits infants receive from being fed breast milk exclusively for the first six months of life. The observation is supported by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF).

Organizations including WHO and the American Academy of Pediatrics have found that in addition to being an optimal source of nutrition, breastfeeding offers babies protection from bacteria and viruses that can lead to potential life threatening diseases. Breastfeeding also benefits mothers; women who choose to breastfeed are less likely to develop breast or ovarian cancer, diabetes and post-partum depression.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, recently designated Baby-Friendly USA promotes exclusive breastfeeding. Our hospital provides several social and clinical programs created to support pregnant and nursing mothers.   Some our programs include breastfeeding education classes, Centering Pregnancy and breastfeeding support groups. The hospital opened a lactation lounge for our community to utilize and access 24 hours, 7 days a week.

For more information about the services we provide, please visit www.JamaicaHospital.org.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Employee Spotlight on Samantha Nunez

This month we shine our employee spotlight on Samantha Nunez an Administrative Assistant in the Department of Ambulatory Care at Jamaica Hospital. Samantha has been working at the hospital for the past two years, and prior to that she was at  Flushing Hospital.
Samantha is a native of Queens, having grown up and attended school in the South Ozone Park and currently resides in St. Albans.  She is a graduate of Martin Van Buren High School and is now studying for her degree at Nassau Community College. Samantha has been greatly influenced by her work in the health field and her future plan is to obtain a master’s degree in Business Administration, specializing in the health professions.
In her free time Samantha enjoys going to concerts, movies, spending time with family and friends, and traveling whenever she has the opportunity. She enjoys all four seasons but the one she likes the most is Spring.
Samantha is very close with her family, especially her grandmother who she tries to see as often as possible. She has a very strong relationship with her two sisters and is surrounded by a very nice group of friends that she also likes to spend time with. Samantha has two puppies, Simba and Bambi that she absolutely adores.
Samantha enjoys the diversity of the people she works with at Jamaica Hospital. She finds her colleagues to be very much like a family, and everyone helps one another to provide a very high level of care to our patients. Samantha has learned a lot by working at Jamaica Hospital and it has definitely influenced her long term goal of being involved in healthcare.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Safely Grilling Food Outdoors

Summertime is a popular time of year for outdoor grilling. Food that is grilled outdoors always seems to delight our family and friends, but if we don’t practice proper food safety, people could get food poisoning.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when grilling food in order to avoid food poisoning:
• Always make sure the utensils you are using are clean before and after you use them
• Keep raw food away from cooked food by using separate plates
• Wash hands thoroughly with soap and water after touching uncooked food
• Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked at the right temperature
145 degrees for whole beef, pork, veal, lamb
145 degrees for fish
160 degrees for hamburgers and ground beef
165 degrees for poultry and hot dogs
• Check the date on the meat package to ensure it is fresh when you buy it
• Don’t leave raw meat or poultry out at room temperature for more than two hours
• Keep uncooked meat refrigerated at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or lower
• After food is cooked, keep it hot until served at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or hotter
• Wash all of the utensils used for grilling after you are done with them
• Do not partially cook food and finish it later
• Keep food out of direct sunlight
• Use a meat thermometer to ensure that meat is cooked at the right temperature

• By following these simple tips, you will ensure a wonderful meal will be enjoyed by everyone.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.