Recognizing The Symptoms of A Stroke

Symptoms of a stroke Stroke is an all too common medical emergency that affects more than 795,000 people in the United States each year; of that number, 140,000 people die from complications.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a stroke occurs every four seconds and someone dies from stroke every four minutes.  Because the chances of an occurrence are high, there is a possibility that you may come in contact with a person while they are having a stroke.  Knowledge is key when helping someone in this situation.

Stroke can occur when there is a blockage of blood supply or bleeding in the brain. Both instances can lead to severe symptoms if not addressed with urgency.   When stroke occurs time equals brain: meaning for every minute without treatment 1.9 million neurons (the building blocks of the nervous system) may become damaged or die.

Time is essential when treating stroke. The sooner you recognize the warning signs, the sooner you can seek emergency care.  When it comes to recognizing stroke, all you have to remember is F-A-S-T:

  • Facial droop: one side of the face isn’t moving like the other. If you ask them to smile, it will appear lop-sided or crooked.
  • Arm weakness: one side may be weaker than the other, or they cannot raise both arms together. There may also be numbness or tingling of the arm or leg.
  • Speech difficulty: slurred speech, or speech that may not make sense. They cannot repeat a simple phrase or aren’t forming their words normally.
  • Time: if you notice any of these signs, call 9-1-1 immediately and remember the time you first noticed symptoms, this will be very important information when it comes to treatment.

Other signs of stroke may include a sudden severe headache, changes to vision, confusion, numbness/tingling, trouble walking or poor balance.

If someone you know has symptoms of stroke, CALL 9-1-1! Emergency medical staff can provide early diagnosis and treatment and ensure that the patient gets transported where they need to go as quickly as possible. Recognizing the signs of stroke early can save a life!

For more information about stroke and stroke prevention and treatment, you can go to www.cdc.gov/stroke or www.stroke.org or schedule an appointment with your doctor to discuss what risk factors you may have and what you can do to minimize your risk of stroke.

To  schedule an appointment with a Family Medicine Doctor at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-6942

Andrew Flowers, MD- Family Medicine

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fruit and Vegetable Safety

I bet your doctor has talked to you at some point in your life about how important it is for your health to eat fruits and vegetables; they can help prevent stroke and heart disease, help you lose weight and even help to protect against certain types of cancer.  But one thing they probably didn’t mention is how important it is to pick and prepare fruits and vegetables properly to prevent food poisoning that can be caused by germs on your fresh produce.

This process all starts at the grocery store or market:

  • It is very important to choose produce that hasn’t been bruised or damaged. This creates an area where potentially harmful germs can grow.
  • Once you have your produce, keep it separated from raw meats in your cart, bags and refrigerator.
  • Make sure to keep pre-cut fruits and vegetables cold or refrigerated. They are less likely to grow harmful germs when kept cold.
  • Don’t be fooled! Read packages carefully as pre-packaged does not always mean pre-washed. There is still a risk of contamination.

Once you’re home, it’s important to:

  • Wash everything that will come into contact with your produce while you’re cooking; including your hands, cooking surfaces, utensils, and the produce itself. It is best to wash your fruits and vegetables under running water.
  • Make sure to remove any bruised or damaged areas of the produce.
  • Store all cut or peeled fruits and vegetables properly. They should be refrigerated within two hours of preparation if they are not going to be cooked.

Certain people have a greater chance of getting food poisoning and it is especially important to be careful when preparing food for them. Those people are the very young, adults older than 65 years old, pregnant women, or anyone with a weakened immune system.

Although most cases of food poisoning are mild, only lasting a few days, there are some more severe forms.  If you experience vomiting or diarrhea for more than three days, have a high fever greater than 101F, or see blood in your stool, you should talk to your doctor immediately.

With a little bit of new knowledge and care, you can protect yourself, enjoy a healthier diet and live a healthier life. Just remember to buy right, store properly, separate for safety and prepare safely.

For more information about current outbreaks of food poisoning related to food products, visit the CDC website at https://www.cdc.gov/features/foodsafetyquiz/

To schedule an appointment with a Family Medicine Physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-6942

Dr. Andrew Flowers, Family Medicine

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Asthma Medications-Dr. Andrew Flowers Helps You To Understand Treatment Options

Do you or someone you know have asthma? If so, you may want to know what treatment options are available and how they can help to manage the condition.

First, you need to understand what asthma is as well as its symptoms. Asthma is a chronic disease that when it is not controlled can make it difficult to breathe. When an asthma attack happens, you may experience coughing, wheezing, chest tightness, or breathlessness. A person may find it difficult to breathe as a result of the narrowing of the airways caused by swelling, mucus production, and the tightening of the muscles around the airways.

Although many people have asthma, it can mean very different things from person to person. You may experience mild or moderate symptoms daily or weekly.  Your doctor will consider these factors when deciding which treatment options are most suitable for your care.

The goal of asthma treatment is to control the disease and to prevent symptoms from interfering with your day-to-day activities. Your doctor determines control of your asthma by the following:

  • How often you experience daytime and nighttime symptoms.
  • How often you use your rescue inhaler.
  • How often you have to go to the doctor for treatment of your symptoms.
  • How much your symptoms interfere with your daily life.

Individuals with poor control of their asthma are usually put on controller medications to manage their condition. Controller medications are to be taken every day to prevent symptoms from occurring and to decrease the severity of symptoms when they do occur.

Controller medications should be used long-term, whether you feel bad or good on a daily basis, as prescribed. Consistency is very important when taking these medications.  Another form of treatment your doctor may prescribe is prescribing a rescue medication. These are to be used on a short-term basis to help you feel better quickly when experiencing coughing, shortness of breath, or wheezing. Here are a few examples of each type of medication.

 

Check out American Lung Association’s guide on how to use your inhaler:

With a spacer

 

Without a spacer: 

When taken as directed, these medications can significantly decrease the burden of asthma on your daily life. Do not hesitate to go to a doctor if home medications are not providing relief.

In addition to taking your medication, it is important to know your asthma triggers and be able to identify symptoms early.

Talk to your doctor about your Asthma Action Plan and ways to better take control of your asthma. To schedule an appointment with the Family Medicine Department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call, 718-206-6942

Andrew Flowers MD, Family Medicine

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.