Treating A Bee Sting

One of the things we least look forward to while enjoying summer weather is being stung by a bee.  In the event that this happens, you should know how to properly treat stings.

Treating bee stings depends on severity. People who are allergic or people who have received multiple stings should seek immediate emergency care. However, if you are not allergic, and have not received multiple stings, you can do the following to relieve pain and swelling:

  • Remove the stinger as soon as possible, in any way that you can ( using tweezers or your fingernails are some ways that you can)
  • Wash the area with soap and water
  • Apply ice or cold compress to reduce swelling
  • Take an over-the-counter pain reliever as instructed
  • Apply hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion  or take oral antihistamines to relieve itching or swelling

If you have a severe reaction to a bee sting, go to the nearest hospital Emergency Room or call 911.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Provides New and Effective Way to Treat Prostate Gland Enlargement

Dr. Ricardo Ricciardi is one of the first Urologists in New York City to be recognized for his efforts in providing a new and effective way to treat Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH), a condition that affects millions of men in the United States.

BPH — also called prostate gland enlargement — is a common condition that many men experience as they get older.  The prostate is a walnut-sized gland that surrounds the urethra. When the prostate becomes enlarged it can lead to BPH, which can cause uncomfortable urinary symptoms, such as frequent or urgent need to urinate and increased frequency of urination at night. In addition to urinary problems, men living with BPH also experience interrupted sleep, loss of productivity, and depression.  Over 40 million men in America are affected by BPH and 12 million are currently under the care of a physician for the condition.

Until recently, men living with BPH were offered two treatment options – medication or surgery. Medication is often the first-line of therapy for BPH, but relief can be inadequate and temporary. In addition, many men have reported various side effects including sexual dysfunction, dizziness and headaches.  Traditionally, the alternative treatment option has been surgery, but surgical options either require cutting, heating or removing prostate tissue to open the blocked urethra. While surgery has been effective in relieving symptoms, it requires a longer recovery period and can also leave patients with permanent side effects such as urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction and retrograde ejaculation.

Now, Dr. Ricciardi is offering the UroLift system, an FDA cleared, revolutionary treatment that provides rapid and durable relief from urinary symptoms associated with BPH. The UroLift system works by placing small, permanent implants into the prostate to lift and hold the enlarged tissue out of the way, relieving pressure on the urethra and allowing urine to flow. There is no cutting, heating, or removal of prostate tissue. This non-invasive procedure is done in an outpatient setting under local anesthesia. Patients experience rapid improvement with minimal side effects and are able to resume their normal routines quickly and no longer require medication.

According to Dr. Ricciardi, “I am privileged to be able to offer my patients the UroLift procedure, which is truly a breakthrough in the treatment of BPH. This procedure provides so many benefits and can increase their overall quality of life without any side effects.”

Dr. Ricciardi has performed over 100 UroLift procedures and his practice has recently been named as a Center of Excellence in this form of treatment. This designation recognizes that Dr. Ricciardi has achieved the highest level of training with the UroLift System and has demonstrated a commitment to providing exemplary care to men suffering from symptoms of BPH.  Less than 70 urologists in the United States have received a Center of Excellence designation and Dr. Ricciardi is the only physician in New York City to receive this honor.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Ricciardi, please call  (718) 206-7110.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Receives Patient Safety Award and Ranks in Top 10% in Nation for Patient Safety

If you are sick and need to go to the hospital, it is important to know that if admitted, your hospital is dedicated to safety, and has a proven track record of preventing further illness and injury to its patients.

Healthgrades, a trusted provider of information to millions of health care consumers across the United States, recently recognized the best-performing hospitals in the country and Jamaica Hospital Medical Center received the Patient Safety Excellence Award, an accolade that recognizes hospitals that lead in the prevention of patient safety events.

This prestigious honor highlights the hospital’s performance in safeguarding patients from serious, potentially preventable complications during their hospital stay.  Jamaica Hospital, part of the MediSys Health Network ranked in the top 10% in the nation for patient safety.

To determine which hospitals receive the Patient Safety Excellence Award, Healthgrades reviews the results of 14 key patient safety indicators submitted by hospitals to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Some of the safety measures surveyed include pressure ulcers, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and postoperative sepsis rates.

Jamaica is one of two hospitals in Queens and one of only four in New York City to receive this honor. The hospital attributes their vastly improved safety rates to robust quality improvement policies and programs that were initiated over a decade ago and that are still being followed and improved upon every day.

According to MediSys Health Network President, Bruce J. Flanz, “Patient Safety is one of the top priorities at Jamaica Hospital. We are proud to be in a position to provide our patients with a safe and trusted environment to receive high-quality care. I would like to thank the many members of our staff who are committed to this effort.”

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Q&A: A lot of patients ask, what is a sexually transmitted infection? How do I protect myself?

A sexually transmitted infection is an infection that is passed from one person to another when they have vaginal, oral or anal sex with someone who is infected. Some infections can also be transmitted by skin-to-skin contact. They are caused by bacteria, viruses, and parasites. The most common sexually transmitted infections are Chlamydia and HPV (Human Papilloma Virus). According to the CDC, there is an increase in cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis in the United States. STIs are preventable. The first step in protecting your health is knowing if you are at risk for an STI and getting tested.

A lot of patients ask “Should I be tested for a sexually transmitted infection?” The answer is that it depends on your sexual history and your risk factors for having an STI. You are at risk of having a sexually transmitted infection if:

  • You are between 15- 24 years old
  • Have more than one sexual partner
  • Have oral, vaginal, or anal sex without using a condom
  • You or your partner has had an STI in the past
  • You or your partner inject drugs
  • You or your partner exchange sex for money or drugs
  • You suspect that your partner may be having sex with other people

If any of the above applies to you, get tested right away. You should also get tested if you notice abnormal bleeding especially after having sex, an increase in the amount of discharge, a change in the color or smell of your discharge or pelvic pain.

Be open and honest with your doctor or healthcare provider. By giving us as much information as you can, we can suggest the proper tests and treatments. Most STIs are curable or manageable.

It important to get treatment because having an STI can increase your chances of giving or getting HIV, can cause pelvic infections that lead to pelvic and abdominal pain, and can cause irreversible scarring that makes it difficult to get pregnant.  Sexually transmitted infections can also be transmitted to your baby while you are still pregnant. The only way to know if you have an STI is to get tested.

“What can I do to protect myself?”

Abstinence or not having sex is the only way to not get an STI. If you decide to have sex with a new partner, it is important that you both get tested before anything happens- including oral sex. Condoms used from start to finish help decrease the chance of getting some STIs. If you or your partner are having sex with other people, it is recommended you use a condom every single time for oral, vaginal and anal sex. It is only safe to stop using condoms if you and your partner have both been tested and are STI-free AND if you are only having sex with each other. Deciding to have sex with someone comes with responsibilities-  Protect yourself! Be honest with your partner. You should be comfortable enough to talk about ways to prevent getting an STI or becoming pregnant. Talk to your doctor about vaccinations against HPV and Hepatitis B. For further information, call us at 718- 291- 3276 to schedule an appointment or visit The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for information on their website: https://www.cdc.gov/std/default.htm

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital’s First Farmers’ Market

As part of Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s (JHMC) effort to provide out community with healthy nutrition and wellness alternatives, we are proud to announce our first Farmers’ Market!  JHMC has partnered with the LI Greenmarket and the Cornell University Cooperative Extension to bring fresh produce and wellness programs for everyone to enjoy!

The Farmers’ Market will be open every Wednesday, 10:00AM – 4:00PM, from June 27, 2018 through November 21, 2018.  The Market will be located at 134-20 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11418.

Remember, fresh is best!

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Prostate Cancer

The prostate gland is a part of the male reproductive system that produces a fluid that mixes with sperm and other fluids during ejaculation.  It sits just below the bladder and is normally about the size of a walnut.

Prostate cancer is an abnormal growth of cells within the prostate gland.  Prostate cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in men and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among American men.  The majority of men who reach the age of 80 are found to have prostate cancer, however, most of the types of prostate cancer grow slowly and may not contribute to any serious harm.  Some types of prostate cancers are more aggressive and can spread to other parts of the body.

Prostate cancer, especially in its early stages, may not have any symptoms.  When symptoms are present they may include difficulty starting urination, less force to the stream of urine, dribbling at the end of urination, needing to urinate frequently, urinating frequently at night, pain while urinating, blood in the urine or semen, difficulty starting or maintaining an erection, pain with ejaculation, pain or stiffness in the lower back, hips, pelvis and upper thighs, or unintended weight loss.

Although it is not known exactly what causes prostate cancer some risk factors for developing prostate cancer are older age (more than 65% of prostate cancers are diagnosed in men older than 65), race (African-American men are 60% more likely to develop prostate cancer than Caucasian men), family history (having a father or brother with prostate cancer) and obesity.

There is an ongoing debate among physicians and medical groups about screening for prostate cancer.  Currently, many organizations including the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP) recommend against routine screening for prostate cancer.  Having a discussion with your doctor about prostate cancer screening can help you decide if you should consider undergoing prostate cancer screening based on your unique health history and preferences.

When screening is done there are two tests that are available.  The available tests are a digital rectal exam (DRE) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.  To perform a digital rectal exam your doctor uses a gloved finger, inserted a few inches into your rectum, to check your prostate gland.  A prostate-specific antigen test is a blood test that measures the level of PSA in your blood.  Many men who have prostate cancer have elevated levels of PSA, however, PSA can also be elevated for less serious causes such as prostate enlargement or infection.  Further testing is needed to diagnose cancer.  Additional tests that your doctor may recommend to diagnose cancer include an ultrasound of the prostate and a biopsy of the prostate.  A biopsy is when a small piece of the prostate is removed to look for abnormal cells.

Treatment of prostate cancer depends on many factors including your age, your overall health and the growth and spread of cancer when it is diagnosed.  Some men who have slow-growing tumors may not need treatment right away and some may never need treatment.  Other types of prostate cancer are aggressive and can quickly spread to other parts of the body making treatment difficult.  Common treatment options include watchful waiting or expectant management (regular testing and checkups to assess for new signs or symptoms), radiation therapy (high-energy x-rays used to kill cancer cells), chemotherapy, surgery (having the prostate gland removed) and hormone therapy.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Preeclampsia Awareness Month

Preeclampsia Awareness Month is a nationally recognized health observance that presents an opportunity to offer education to help increase awareness of this life-threatening disorder.

Preeclampsia occurs in eight percent of all pregnancies.  Formerly called toxemia, preeclampsia is a condition that is marked by high blood pressure in pregnant women that have previously not experienced high blood pressure.  Symptoms of preeclampsia include high levels of protein found in their urine and they may have swelling in the feet, legs and hands.  Preeclampsia appears late in the pregnancy, generally after the 20 week mark, although, in some cases, it can appear earlier.

If left undiagnosed and untreated, preeclampsia can become a more serious condition called eclampsia, which can put the expectant mother and baby at risk.

There is no cure for preeclampsia, but when it is caught in its early stages, it is easier to manage.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

STI (STD) Awareness Month

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are spread by sexual contact. April marks National STI Awareness Month, a campaign sparked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an effort to counter the nation’s high rates of sexually transmitted infections. The United States currently has one of the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases among all countries in the developed world. Here are three important facts to remember about the ongoing public health epidemic in this country:

  1. The current epidemic is driven by just two STDs — even though there’s already a vaccine to prevent one of them.

The nation’s STI epidemic is mainly caused by HPV and chlamydia. That’s good and bad news. On one hand, chlamydia is easily cured with antibiotics, and there’s already an extremely effective vaccine to prevent HPV transmission. But young Americans still aren’t getting their HPV shots, even though the CDC urges parents to vaccinate their children — both girls and boys — before they reach their early 20s.

  1. Women disproportionately bear the burden of STIs.

Based on the female anatomy women are actually more vulnerable to contract STDs than men are — but they’re also less likely to notice the symptoms. Signs of an STI are less apparent on female genitalia and women commonly confuse STD symptoms for less serious issues, like a yeast infection. Sexually transmitted infections often have more longer-term consequences for women that can lead to infertility, and pregnant women can pass STDs to their unborn babies.

  1. Having healthcare makes it easier to get tested.

The health care reform law now requires insurance companies to provide reproductive health services free of charge, U.S. citizens are able to receive HIV/AIDS counseling, STD counseling, and HPV testing without a co-pay.

There is a lot of misinformation out there about sex, sexual health, and sexually transmitted infections. The best way to prevent STI’s is to not have sexual intercourse but that isn’t realistic for most. However, knowledge of prevention is the second best option. To prevent the transmission of STIs, people need to be taught how to effectively use condoms.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), outlines the steps on their website https://www.cdc.gov/condomeffectiveness/male-condom-use.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Q&A: A lot of patients ask, do I need a PAP smear every year?

Dr. Peter Wong OB/GYN Jamaica Hospital

A PAP smear is looking at the cells of the cervix for any abnormalities. This can help identify cervical cancer. A lot of patients ask, do I need a PAP smear every year?
For a majority of women, the short answer is no. The true answer is dependent on a number of factors: past PAP smear results, your age, and the type of testing that has been done.

In 2012, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends women start getting PAP smears starts at age 21. For women age 21 to 65 years, the USPSTF recommends a PAP smear every 3 years. For women age 30 to 65 years who want to lengthen the screening interval, screening with a combination of cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years.

If a woman has any abnormal findings in their PAP smear or HPV testing, then the screening interval changes.
You should continue to visit your gynecologist for yearly annual exams to ensure overall health. Your clinician will check for any signs of infection, prolapse, and abnormal growths (fibroids, cysts, polyps).

Each individual’s case is unique, speak to your doctor about your current health and their recommendations for a PAP smear.

For women experiencing gynecological issues, Jamaica Hospital provides many highly specialized services and treatments for a wide range of conditions that affect women’s health. Our specially trained staff offers expert diagnosis and treatment options for multiple forms of gynecological cancers as well as services to treat complications that may develop from fibroid tumors, bladder conditions, or menopause.

If you would like more information, please feel free to contact us at 718-206-6808.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Doctors Nominated As Region’s Top Doctors

For more than two decades, Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. has been a recognizable resource for identifying the area’s Top Doctors.

The organization’s selection process is based on peer nominations, of which more than 50,000 physicians, hospital and healthcare executives are contacted directly for their input. The Castle Connolly physician-led research team then carefully reviews the credentials of every physician that is considered for inclusion in Castle Connolly Guides®, magazine articles and websites. After a thorough review of credentials, nominated physicians are chosen to appear on the list of Castle Connolly Top Doctors.

This year we are pleased to announce that five doctors from Jamaica Hospital have been selected as Top Doctors in the New York Metro Area for 2018.

Doctors affiliated with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center are:

  • Cono M. Grasso, Ophthalmology
  • Steven R. Inglis, Maternal and Fetal Medicine
  • Riccardo Ricciardi, Jr., Urology
  • Alan R. Roth, Family Medicine
  • Craig A. Thurm, Pulmonary Disease

The Medisys Health Network prides itself on providing the highest quality of care to all of our patients. We congratulate all of our doctors chosen for the 2018 Castle Connolly Top Doctors Guide.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.