STI (STD) Awareness Month

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also known as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that are spread by sexual contact. April marks National STI Awareness Month, a campaign sparked by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an effort to counter the nation’s high rates of sexually transmitted infections. The United States currently has one of the highest rates of sexually transmitted diseases among all countries in the developed world. Here are three important facts to remember about the ongoing public health epidemic in this country:

  1. The current epidemic is driven by just two STDs — even though there’s already a vaccine to prevent one of them.

The nation’s STI epidemic is mainly caused by HPV and chlamydia. That’s good and bad news. On one hand, chlamydia is easily cured with antibiotics, and there’s already an extremely effective vaccine to prevent HPV transmission. But young Americans still aren’t getting their HPV shots, even though the CDC urges parents to vaccinate their children — both girls and boys — before they reach their early 20s.

  1. Women disproportionately bear the burden of STIs.

Based on the female anatomy women are actually more vulnerable to contract STDs than men are — but they’re also less likely to notice the symptoms. Signs of an STI are less apparent on female genitalia and women commonly confuse STD symptoms for less serious issues, like a yeast infection. Sexually transmitted infections often have more longer-term consequences for women that can lead to infertility, and pregnant women can pass STDs to their unborn babies.

  1. Having healthcare makes it easier to get tested.

The health care reform law now requires insurance companies to provide reproductive health services free of charge, U.S. citizens are able to receive HIV/AIDS counseling, STD counseling, and HPV testing without a co-pay.

There is a lot of misinformation out there about sex, sexual health, and sexually transmitted infections. The best way to prevent STI’s is to not have sexual intercourse but that isn’t realistic for most. However, knowledge of prevention is the second best option. To prevent the transmission of STIs, people need to be taught how to effectively use condoms.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), outlines the steps on their website https://www.cdc.gov/condomeffectiveness/male-condom-use.html

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Q&A: A lot of patients ask, do I need a PAP smear every year?

Dr. Peter Wong OB/GYN Jamaica Hospital

A PAP smear is looking at the cells of the cervix for any abnormalities. This can help identify cervical cancer. A lot of patients ask, do I need a PAP smear every year?
For a majority of women, the short answer is no. The true answer is dependent on a number of factors: past PAP smear results, your age, and the type of testing that has been done.

In 2012, U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends women start getting PAP smears starts at age 21. For women age 21 to 65 years, the USPSTF recommends a PAP smear every 3 years. For women age 30 to 65 years who want to lengthen the screening interval, screening with a combination of cytology and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing every 5 years.

If a woman has any abnormal findings in their PAP smear or HPV testing, then the screening interval changes.
You should continue to visit your gynecologist for yearly annual exams to ensure overall health. Your clinician will check for any signs of infection, prolapse, and abnormal growths (fibroids, cysts, polyps).

Each individual’s case is unique, speak to your doctor about your current health and their recommendations for a PAP smear.

For women experiencing gynecological issues, Jamaica Hospital provides many highly specialized services and treatments for a wide range of conditions that affect women’s health. Our specially trained staff offers expert diagnosis and treatment options for multiple forms of gynecological cancers as well as services to treat complications that may develop from fibroid tumors, bladder conditions, or menopause.

If you would like more information, please feel free to contact us at 718-206-6808.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Doctors Nominated As Region’s Top Doctors

For more than two decades, Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. has been a recognizable resource for identifying the area’s Top Doctors.

The organization’s selection process is based on peer nominations, of which more than 50,000 physicians, hospital and healthcare executives are contacted directly for their input. The Castle Connolly physician-led research team then carefully reviews the credentials of every physician that is considered for inclusion in Castle Connolly Guides®, magazine articles and websites. After a thorough review of credentials, nominated physicians are chosen to appear on the list of Castle Connolly Top Doctors.

This year we are pleased to announce that five doctors from Jamaica Hospital have been selected as Top Doctors in the New York Metro Area for 2018.

Doctors affiliated with Jamaica Hospital Medical Center are:

  • Cono M. Grasso, Ophthalmology
  • Steven R. Inglis, Maternal and Fetal Medicine
  • Riccardo Ricciardi, Jr., Urology
  • Alan R. Roth, Family Medicine
  • Craig A. Thurm, Pulmonary Disease

The Medisys Health Network prides itself on providing the highest quality of care to all of our patients. We congratulate all of our doctors chosen for the 2018 Castle Connolly Top Doctors Guide.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

January is National Glaucoma Awareness Month

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that mainly affects people who are middle-aged or older, but it can affect anyone at any age. There are more than three million people in the United States and 60 million people worldwide who suffer from glaucoma.
Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness.Typically the disease starts to develop suddenly, often without symptoms,  and once vision is lost, it is permanent. As much as 40 percent of vision can be lost before some people even notice a problem. It usually starts with loss of peripheral vision.Glaucoma is caused by damage to the optic nerve so that the brain isn’t able to receive images from the eyes. There are two types of Glaucoma, Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma where pressure inside the eye increases on its own and damages the optic nerve and Secondary Glaucoma where another disease causes the pressure in the eye to increase and that results in optic nerve damage. Both types will eventually lead to blindness.

Early detection of Glaucoma can help to slow down the progression of the disease. Regular eye exams are very important. To schedule an appointment with an eye doctor at Flushing Hospital, please call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Holiday Tips For People With Diabetes

The holiday season is here and it seems like everywhere we go a variety of treats are being served.  It becomes hard to resist temptation and we may eat more than we normally do.

While overeating is not a good idea for anyone, people who have diabetes have to be very mindful of the things they eat and practice healthy habits.

Following these tips can help diabetics to manage their health and still enjoy the holidays:
• Try to keep to a regular schedule of when you eat.
• If you are going to a party, offer to bring a healthy dish with you.
• Cut back on food high in carbohydrates and fat if you are going to be eating sweets
• Don’t skip meals in anticipation of eating one big one, that could lead to overeating.
• Make sure you find time for some exercise to burn up the extra calories
• Eat the things you enjoy, but try to watch the portion sizes
• Get plenty of rest.
• Check your blood sugar regularly.
• Try not to consume a lot of soda or alcoholic beverages.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dr’s Tips: Ways to Cope With The Loss of a Loved One During the Holidays

For many, the holidays are the time of year when we hope to create new and happy memories while spending quality time with the people we love.  We aim to enjoy the positive feelings the season brings.

For those who have experienced a loss, the holidays may not feel as blissful.  It is the time of year that they miss their loved one the most, and the traditional indicators (decorations, parties, etc.) of the season can cause them to feel sad or alone. These emotions can become increasingly overwhelming, making it difficult to cope with grief.

While everyone handles grief differently, there are practical things they can do to help them cope with a sense of loss during the holidays.  Dr. Gina Basello, Associate Director of the Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellowship and Vice Chair of the Department of Family Medicine at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, advises, “Dealing with the loss of a loved one is challenging and the pain can be overwhelming.  While there is no right or wrong way to grieve, there are healthy ways to cope with that pain.”  Here are a few of Dr. Basello’s recommendations:

  • Allow yourself to feel- There are various emotions associated with grief. After losing a loved one you may feel, sad, angry or helpless. Don’t feel bad if happy things make you feel unhappy. Whatever your emotions are, recognize them and accept them as part of your grieving process.
  • Express how you feel- Acknowledging your emotions is a great first step. Now that you have identified how you feel, you should express those feelings. Talking to a friend, family member or a trusted health professional is helpful.  Do not be afraid or embarrassed to ask for their support; they can help with your healing process.
  • Take care of yourself- Now is the time that you should be most in touch with your mental and physical health. If you are experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression for prolonged periods of time, seek help right away from loved ones or a mental health professional.  Staying on top of your physical health can also help you through this time; exercise, eat a healthy diet and get adequate amounts of sleep.
  • Create new traditions –Creating new traditions in memory of loved ones can help you stay positive and can provide opportunities to find meaningful ways to remember those you have lost.

The holidays can certainly be a difficult after experiencing a loss.  Paying attention to the way you feel and applying these positive approaches to coping can help you through the season.  However, if you continue to feel overwhelmed, do not hesitate to seek the assistance of a professional who is trained to help during your time of bereavement.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips to Maintain Dental Health During the Holidays

The holiday season is a wonderful time of year. While it is easy to get caught up in the merriment, we need be to be mindful of the effects all of the holiday festivities can have on our dental health. With sweet treats all around us, one particular cause of concern is how our teeth can be impacted.

Here are a few tips to help make sure we maintain good oral health into the new year:

  • Don’t forget your dental routine – No matter how busy you get this holiday season, don’t forget to practice good oral hygiene.
  • Eat healthy – Cookies and sweets are nice holiday treats, but instead of reaching for another candy cane, take a cue from the reindeer and fill your plate with vegetables, such as carrots.
  • Drink healthy – Avoid drinking sodas, sports drinks and juices with lots of sugar. Instead, drink water with fluoride in it to keep your teeth strong and healthy. If you want something bubbly, try carbonated water. If you must drink soda, use a straw to keep most of the acid off your teeth.
  • Be responsible while drinking alcohol – Aside from all the obvious reasons to be responsible when consuming alcohol, also know that it can affect your teeth. Red wine can stain your teeth and the acid in most alcoholic beverages can also be damaging.
  • Don’t skip your dental visit – We all know how hectic the holidays are, but whether it is a regular check-up or a visit to deal with an existing issue, it is important to make the time to honor your regular dental visit and not out it off until after the holidays.
  • Don’t use your teeth as a tool – Avoid using your teeth to tear open packages, tear tape or ribbons, or cracking nuts. These types of cations can lead to chips or breaks.
  • Stuff your stocking wisely – Sugary treats such as candy canes are a holiday staple, but try to limit the number of sweets in Christmas stockings that can lead to cavities. Use the holidays as an opportunity to replace everyone in the family’s toothbrush by dropping one in each stocking.

By following these simple dental tips, you can avoid being placed on Santa’s naughty list this year.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Dr’s Tips For Dealing with Holiday Stress

During the holiday season, many of us struggle to complete an extensive list of tasks in what often feels like very little time.   We run rampant decorating our homes, attending social gatherings, shopping for loved ones, volunteering, traveling or cooking.  These activities are often added to our already busy schedules, which can make us feel overwhelmed.

Contrary to what we may think, these activities which should make us feel happy can actually increase our stress levels.

Although there are various factors such as unrealistic expectations or financial strain that contribute to holiday stress, finding ways to avoid stressors or minimize their effects is very important. If stress is not managed well, it can have a significantly negative impact on our health.

Dr. Madhu Rajanna; Director of  the Mental Health Clinic and Assistant Director of the Psychiatry Residency program at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers  five tips to help you cope with holiday stress and maintain good mental health:

  1. Set realistic goals– Unrealistic goals often equal added pressure and expectations that cannot be met. If these goals are not met, they can lead to negative feelings such as inadequacy or hopelessness.
  2. Know when to take a moment for yourself (Take a break) – We are often pulled in multiple directions during this time of the year. Know when to take a breather to decompress and clear your mind.
  3. Communicate- The added pressures of the holidays are clearly overwhelming and one of the ways that people sometimes deal with this is to isolate themselves. This is not recommended; instead, reach out to loved ones or a trained mental health professional to communicate how you feel.
  4. Do not neglect healthy habits– Taking good care of your health can help combat holiday stress. Moderating your food intake, fitting in a few minutes of exercise and getting adequate amounts of sleep can be profoundly beneficial for your health.   Additionally, maintaining a healthy daily routine can help take your mind off holiday demands.
  5. Ask for help- We live in a time where multitasking has become the norm but if you begin to feel overwhelmed, ask for help. Soliciting the help of friends or family can alleviate some of the holiday pressure. The holidays can also trigger depression; if you are experiencing symptoms of depression ask for help from loved ones or seek the assistance of a mental health professional.

Dr. Madhu Rajanna- Director of the Mental Health Clinic and Assistant Director of the Psychiatry Residency program

The holiday season can be overwhelming; however, by applying Dr. Rajanna’s helpful tips you can take the steps needed to minimize stress and make this time of year more enjoyable.  If you find that you continue to experience elevated levels of stress or symptoms of depression, it is recommended that you seek the help of mental health professional immediately.

To schedule an appointment with the Mental Health Clinic at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-5575.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Diabetes Prevention

Are you one of the estimated one in three adults in this country who have pre-diabetes?

Pre-diabetes is a silent health condition that has no symptoms and is almost always present before you develop type 2 diabetes.

It is a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as full-blown diabetes. If you haven’t visited your doctor, a good way to see if you are at increased risk for pre-diabetes is to take the American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) Diabetes risk test by visiting www.diabetes.org/risk.

Among those who should be screened for pre-diabetes include overweight adults age 45 and older or those under age 45 who are overweight and who have one or more of the following risk factors:

  • Habitually physically inactive
  • Have previously been identified as having impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)
  • Have a family history of diabetes
  • Are members of certain ethnic groups (including Asian, African-American, Hispanic or Native American)
  • Have had gestational diabetes or have given birth to a child weighing more than 9 pounds
  • Have elevated blood pressure
  • Have elevated cholesterol
  • Have polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Have a history of vascular disease

That said, if you have pre-diabetes, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes can be reduced by a sustained modest weight loss and increased moderate-physical activity, such as walking 30 minutes a day.

Through weight loss and increased physical activity, a dietitian may direct you on how to make food choices that cut down on the amount of fat and carbohydrates by:

  • Eating more foods that are broiled and fewer foods that are fried
  • Decrease the amount of butter you use in cooking
  • Eat more fish and chicken
  • Eat more meatless meals
  • Re-Orient your meals to reflect more vegetables and fruit

If you have symptoms such as increased thirst, frequent urination, fatigue and blurred vision, you may have crossed from pre-diabetes to type 2 diabetes.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center now offers a free and innovative approach to treat patients who are at risk for developing diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was developed by the National Institute of Health and is aimed at managing the health of individuals with either prediabetes or borderline diabetes.

These meetings are facilitated by “Lifestyle Coaches” who are specially trained and certified Jamaica Hospital Patient Navigators with strong interpersonal and group facilitation skills.For more information about eligibility or to sign up for the Diabetes Prevention Program, please call 718-206-7088.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Quinoa Edamame Salad

QUINOA EDAMAME SALAD aka Traffic Light Salad

Yields:  Approximately 12 – 15 servings

Preparation time and cook time: total 15 minutes

 

Salad Ingredients:

1 cup uncooked quinoa, prepared according to package direction

1 12 oz bag frozen shelled edamame, defrosted

3 scallions chopped

1 red pepper chopped

1 can of yellow corn

1 avocado chopped

Dressing Ingredients:

¼ cup red wine vinegar

3 Tbsp water

½ cup olive oil

1 Packet Good Seasons Italian Salad Dressing Packet (0.7oz)

Directions:

In a small pot, combine quinoa and 1 cup water. Bring to a boil; reduce heat. Cover; simmer for 12 – 15 minutes or until water is absorbed. Remove from heat; set aside.

In a large bowl combine the quinoa, edamame, corn, red pepper, scallions, and avocado; toss to combine. Add dressing; toss to coat.

Source: Anonymous

Registered Dietitians at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center assist patients to grow their knowledge about nutrition, wellness, and healthy eating. An appointment with a Registered Dietitian consists of a comprehensive nutrition assessment, nutrition education, behavior modification counseling and goal setting. Each goal established is individually tailored to patient’s specific nutritional and medical issues. Our outpatient Registered Dietitians specialize in weight management counseling, diabetes, as well as pediatric and prenatal nutrition.

To schedule an appointment, please call 718-206-7056.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.