Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

When a person is recognized as having Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, or OCD, they demonstrate unreasonable thoughts and fears that make them perform repetitive and ritualized behaviors.  A person with OCD feels obliged to perform these actions as a way to reduce their stress and anxiety. They will feel that by not giving in to these impulses will cause something bad to happen, which can raise their stress and anxiety.

Traits of Obsessive Compulsive Disorders fall into themes:
• Washers  – have a fear of germs makes them wash their hands  over and over
• Checkers – will check to make sure a door is locked more than once
• Doubters and sinners – fearful that harm will occur to someone if everything isn’t done correctly
• Counters and arrangers – everything has to be in a certain order or something will go wrong
• Hoarders – hold on to everything so that nothing bad will occur
There are three main theories as to what causes obsessive compulsive disorder:
• Biology – caused by changes in the body’s chemical make-up or the way the brain functions.
• Environment – causes a person to respond to a triggering event that leads to the obsessive compulsive behavior.
• Genetics – may contribute to a person’s susceptibility to OCD and also a certain level of stress in a person’s life may be a factor.

What should a person do if they feel they may have obsessive compulsive disorder? The first step is to identify what traits they feel they are exhibiting that may be out of the ordinary. Consulting with a primary care physician about symptoms is a good place to begin. They may recommend seeing a mental health professional who can determine the degree of OCD and recommend psychotherapy and possibly medication to control the symptoms. 

You can schedule an appointment with a mental health professional at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-7071.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Prenatal Customs From Around The World

prenatal 179220184Prenatal customs may vary from country to country but what is found to be universal is: mothers want what’s best for their babies. In order to ensure the health of developing babies some mothers may practice customs that may seem unusual or non-traditional. Here a few customs practiced by women from around the world that are believed to be beneficial during pregnancy:

Japan– It is believed by some that being surrounded by positive images, thinking and music promotes a healthy pregnancy. It is also customary for mother and baby to stay at the mother’s parents’ home for at least a month after leaving the hospital.

Bali-In Bali moms-to-be are at times discouraged from eating octopus; it is believed that doing so can cause difficulties during pregnancy.

Netherlands– Most expecting mothers in Holland are often referred to a midwife during pregnancy instead of an obstetrician. Family doctors will however refer women to an obstetrician if the pregnancy is high risk or if there are complications during delivery.

Bolivia-It is believed by a number of women that knitting while pregnant endangers the baby because knitting may cause the umbilical cord to wrap around the baby’s neck.

Guatemala– Some women in this country believe that remaining inside the home for the entire nine months of gestation will protect the infant from evil or illnesses.

China- Several women in China wear anti-radiation vests to protect developing babies from the exposure of cell phones, microwaves and computers. It is believed that exposure to these items can lead to birth defects and miscarriages.

Panama- Mothers are often encouraged to only eat natural foods and avoid processed foods.  The consumption of only natural foods will prevent colic and help the mother in regaining her figure.

Mexico– Many believe if the mother does not eat the food that she is craving during pregnancy; the baby will be born with a birth mark in the shape of that food.

Kenya- The Akamaba people of Kenya may discourage sex during pregnancy; it is believed that sex may result in the birth of a disabled child.

Integrating practices in modern medicine and traditional customs often prove beneficial for fetal development. Women are highly encouraged to seek prenatal care from a medical professional as soon as possible. Early prenatal care can reduce the odds of having low birth weight, identify risks or complications and decrease the risk of pre-term birth.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.