Employee Spotlight on Frank Filloramo

This month we shine our Employee Spotlight on Frank Filloramo, Paramedic.

Frank Filloramo is a very familiar face to many people as he has worked in the Pre-Hospital Care Department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center for over 30 years. Frank grew up in Howard Beach, New York and went to elementary school at St. Helen’s, then on to Christ the King for High School, and attended St. John’s University.

While working at Jamaica Hospital, Frank worked for the New York City Police Department as a Sergeant in the Counterterrorism Division. He retired from that position in 2010 after having served for twenty years. He also worked part time for two years as a paramedic for the New York Mets at Citifield. He says it was a great experience and he met some very interesting players. In 2017, Frank was one of the employees who went to Puerto Rico as part of Jamaica Hospital’s Hurricane Maria relief effort to the island.

Frank currently lives in Connecticut and has three beautiful daughters, ages 16, 13, and 10 years old. They mean the world to him. In his free time he enjoys cooking with his girls, especially making home-made pizza. Frank says that family is the most important part of his life. This is why holidays that involve family gatherings such as Christmas are special to him. While his immediate family is his number one priority, he values his family at Jamaica Hospital as well.

Frank enjoys working at Jamaica Hospital. He says that it is like a second home. The hospital allows Frank to live his dream of helping others and sharing his knowledge with colleagues. Jamaica Hospital is fortunate to have Frank as part of our team at and we look forward to him remaining with us for many more years.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Health Benefits of Pumpkins and a Recipe Too!

Synonymous with the fall season are apples, squash and, of course, pumpkins.  Did you know that pumpkins are not only tasty, they are quite healthy.

Some health benefits of pumpkins are:

  • They are highly rich in Vitamin A
  • They contain antioxidants and immune boosters that may reduce your risk of chronic illnesses
  • They are high in nutrients and low in calories
  • They contain compounds that promote healthy skin.

Now that you know about some of the health benefits of pumpkin, why not try this tasty gluten free, vegan Creamy Pumpkin Soup recipe.  It’s healthy, easy to prepare and delicious. Just click the link below to get started!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pain Caused By Under-Using Our Muscles

Pain management Jamaica NY

One of the most common reasons we experience pain in our joints and muscles is from overuse. Whether it is through overdoing at the gym, at home, or in the yard, we have all experienced pain when we over-exert our muscles but are you aware that you can experience pain by under-using your muscles?

The truth is there can be serious consequences to our bodies from inactivity. In fact, studies have concluded a clear connection between inactivity and chronic pain.  This condition has been given the term “disuse syndrome” which refers to the changes that happen in the body as a result of being sedentary or inactive.

Disuse syndrome has been known to cause deterioration of the musculoskeletal system. When a muscle is not being used regularly, the muscle will begin to atrophy, (the process of wasting away, especially as a result of the degeneration of cells). The clearest example of this is when someone has a cast removed from one of their arms or legs. Usually, the immobilized limb is much smaller than the other due to a lack of exercise.

The same logic applies to the other muscles of the body. The less frequently the muscles in our body are used, the smaller and weaker they become. This decrease in muscle mass and strength can lead to chronic pain in the body. Disuse syndrome is a well-known cause of chronic back pain. When the muscles that are meant to hold the weight of the body become weak, the weight of the body falls on the skeletal system, specifically the spine. This can lead to degeneration and chronic back pain.

The best way to avoid or reverse the effects of disuse syndrome is through physical activity. It is also an excellent way to manage and decrease already existing pain. Regular exercise and the proper diet are the essential tools you need to combat chronic pain and maintain your good health.

If you suspect that your pain in your body is the result of disuse syndrome, speak to your doctor about how you can incorporate more physical activity in your lifestyle and reduce your chronic pain.

If you would like to make an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Red Ribbon Week

The last week in October is Red Ribbon Week.  During this week, health care professionals and the National Family Partnership (NFP) raise awareness about drug addiction through the Red Ribbon Campaign.

Did you know that children whose parents talk to them about the dangers of drug abuse are 42% less likely to use drugs?  Seems reasonable, then you read the statistics which show less than a quarter of teens in America report having this conversation with their parents or guardians.

To learn more about the Red Ribbon Campaign or if you’d like to take the Drug Free Pledge, visit http://redribbon.org/downloads/.

If you or your loved one is battling addiction, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s (JHMC) Addiction Services Department, located at Flushing Hospital Medical Center (FHMC) can help you navigate this difficult time.  If you would like to learn more about what JHMC offers, visit https://www.flushinghospital.org/clinical-services/addiction-services.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Dr. Jebun Nahar

Jamaica Hospital would like to introduce you to Dr. Jebun Nahar, MD, FACP; internist in the hospital’s Department of Medicine for 11 years.

Dr. Nahar provides a comprehensive range of primary care services for her patients, but one condition that she is extremely passionate about treating is hypertension. According to Dr. Nahar, “I feel that hypertension is largely preventable and can be managed through lifestyle modifications. If not addressed, it can lead to a variety of other health issues including diabetes and heart disease.”

Dr. Nahar believes in developing a close connection with her patients that is based on trust. She also feels that her years of experience and her understanding of the community’s needs help her as a physician. One aspect of working at Jamaica Hospital that particularly appeals to Dr. Nahar is the diverse population that it serves.

One group that has especially benefitted from Dr. Nahar’s expertise is the Bengali population. “As someone who is from Bangladesh, I can relate to and help them with not only their health, but other issues they might be encountering.” She is even a member of multiple physician groups that represent that region including the South Asian IPA and the Bangladesh Medical Association of North America.

In addition to providing high-quality care to her patients, Dr. Nahar also has a love for mentoring the next generation of doctors at Jamaica Hospital and is an active part of the hospital’s teaching faculty.

Dr. Nahar sees patients at the following locations:

TJH Medical Services
134-20 Jamaica Avenue
Jamaica, NY 11418
718-206-6742

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Jamaica Hospital Offers Facts About Cold Sores

Cold sores are small fluid filled blisters, also known as fever blisters, that are develop on or near the mouth and the lips. They are caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV-1). Cold sores are highly contagious and are spread by coming in close contact with secretions from the blisters or sharing utensils or other personal hygiene items with an infected person. It is important to keep in mind that the virus can spread even when an infected person does not have a cold sore.

A cold sore usually develops in several stages during an outbreak. The stages of a cold sore are:

1 Tingling and itching near the mouth
2 Formation of a fluid filled blister
3 The blister breaks
4 Scab forms
5 Scab falls off and sore heals

Additional symptoms a person may experience during an outbreak include:

  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Muscle aches
  • Swollen lymph nodes

There are several factors that can cause a cold sore to develop or reoccur if a person has already had an outbreak in the past: These include:

  • Stress
  • Fatigue
  • Eating certain foods
  • Having a cold
  • Allergic reaction

The diagnosis of a cold sore can usually be made by visual inspection. It is also possible to do a blood test to see if the virus is present.

There are no cures for a cold sore but there are ways to treat the symptoms.  Antiviral medications are often prescribed and there re over the counter medications treatment available to purchase.

Speak to your physician if you think you have a cold sore and it doesn’t start to heal in two weeks. You can also schedule an appointmrnt with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Grilled Chicken Taco Salad Recipe

 

It’s TacoTuesday and today we’re making a healthy Grilled Chicken Taco Salad with Cilantro Lime Vinaigrette.

This is a quick dinner recipe shared by Chef Peter Ieraci from our Nutritional Services Department.  It’s delicious and easy to make. Enjoy!

Salad Ingredients:

Cilantro

Grilled chicken

Corn tortilla chips

Shredded cheddar

Diced tomatoes

Cucumbers

Corn

Limes

Red Onions

Black beans

Lettuce

Sour cream -optional on  top

 

To make the salad dressing  you will need :

2 cups fresh cilantro

1 garlic clove

¼ cup lime juice

2 teaspoons maple syrup or honey

½ teaspoon ground coriander

½ teaspoon sea salt

½ cup extra-virgin olive oil

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Importance of Knowing Your Family Medical History

family medical historyDiseases such as diabetes, asthma, cystic fibrosis, Alzheimer’s and cancer are known to run in families.   Members of your family share certain genetic traits that can serve as clues in assessing your risk of developing hereditary diseases. That is why it is important to know your family’s medical history.

The more you know about your family’s medical history, the better. Try to gather as much information as you can from blood relatives. You can do so by reaching out and letting family members know why you are collecting this information.

When gathering your family’s medical history, there are a few key components you should include. They are:

  • Major medical issues and conditions  that run in the family
  • Age of onset ( When each member of your family was diagnosed with a medical condition)
  • Causes of death
  • Ethnic backgrounds ( Some ethnicities are more at risk for developing certain diseases than others)
  • Environment ( Families  may  share common environments that can have an impact on their health)

If you are unable to obtain this information from family members, documents such as death certificates may provide some answers.

Be sure to record information in a safe place and share it with other members of your family. You should also share the information collected with your doctor who may recommend screening tests for conditions you may be at risk for developing.

Although you cannot change your genetic makeup, knowing your family’s history can help you take the steps needed to reduce your risk of inherited diseases. If applicable, you can stop smoking, lose weight change your diet, exercise more frequently or reduce the amount of alcohol you consume to lower your risk.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Fall Allergies

Ever ask yourself, “Why are my allergies kicking up, it’s not spring or summer?”  The answer may be that if you are a warmer weather allergy sufferer, you will most likely be sensitive to allergens in the fall too.

While the fall season signals the beginning of cooler temperatures, it can be especially difficult for those who are sensitive to mold and ragweed pollen. If you are one of these people, symptoms such as sneezing, itchy eyes, congestion and headaches can reoccur leaving you feeling miserable.

There are several things you can do to find relief. If symptoms are mild, try the following suggestions which may provide temporary relief:

  • Closing windows and doors at night or whenever ragweed counts are high
  • Trying over the counter remedies such as decongestants or antihistamines
  • Rinsing your eyes with a saline solution
  • Trying nasal irrigation
  • Taking steamy showers
  • Wearing a mask while doing yard work
  • Washing clothes and linens frequently
  • Using air purifiers equipped with HEPA filters
  • Keeping indoor air dry by using a dehumidifier
  • Thoroughly washing your face and hair when you get home

If your symptoms are continuous and affect your ability to carry out routine activities, you should speak with an allergist.  Your allergist will be able to help you identify what triggers your seasonal allergies and provide the best course of treatment to offer relief or stop symptoms.

The Division of Allergy and Immunology at Jamaica Hospital focuses on the diagnosis and long-term treatment of allergic and immunologic conditions. To schedule an appointment with an allergist, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Back to School Safety Tips

The school year has begun and  road travel increases. This can be a dangerous time of year, especially for children.

Many children rely on walking, riding a bicycle, or taking a bus to and from school. Fewer daylight hours can make it harder for motorists to see these young students. Take advantage of the following tips to strengthen your traffic safety knowledge:

Car:

  • All passengers should wear a seat belt.
  • All children should ride in an age- and size-appropriate car safety seat or booster seat. until the vehicle’s seat belt fits properly (usually when the child reaches about 4′ 9” and          is between eight to 12 years of age).

School Bus:

  • Children should always board and exit the bus at locations that provide safe access to the curb or to the school building.
  • Remind your child to wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb.
  • Make sure your child walks where they can see the bus driver (which means the driver will be able to see them too).
  • Remind your child to look both ways to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing the street.

 

Walking:

  • Make sure your child’s walk to school follows a safe route with trained crossing guards at every intersection.
  • If your children are young or are walking to a new school, walk with them the first week or until you are sure they know the route and can do it safely.
  • Bright-colored clothing will make your child more visible to drivers.

Bike:

  • Always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride.
  • Ride on the right, in the same direction as auto traffic.
  • Respect traffic lights and stop signs.

Following these simple rules can help to prevent accidents and will keep you and children safe.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.