Watching your weight: Are you drinking your calories?

At the beginning of the new year, people make resolutions.On the top of the list is losing weight or eating healthier.If you are one of many who have vowed to change the way you eat to mind your waistline, don’t just think about minding what you eat- think about what you drink, as well. If you’re meeting up with friends for a few drinks after work, you may want limit your alcohol intake during the happy hour.

Alcohol is full of emptWeightDrinksy calories and although there is no direct link between alcohol and obesity, research has shown it can be a reason to why people may place more on their plate than necessary. Trusted websites, such as Medicine.net reported, “Studies have shown that in the short term, alcohol stimulates food intake and can also increase feelings of hunger. Having your judgment impaired and stimulating your appetite is a recipe for failure if you are trying to follow a weight-loss plan.” A Margarita with chips and salsa may sound appetizing, but the calories in a Margarita drink can be as high as 270 empty calories; a reason the bowl of chips seem endless. Here are few other drinks and their calories to keep in mind the next time you’re out for lunch, dinner or happy hour:

Alcoholic drink                                                           Calories

Beer, regular, 12 oz.                                                     150

Frozen daiquiri, 4 oz.                                                    216

Mai tai, 4 oz.                                                                 310

Margarita, 4 oz.                                                            270

Whiskey, 1.5 oz.                                                           105

Wine, dessert, sweet, 4 oz.                                          180

Some helpful tips to help curb your alcohol calorie consumption are:

  • Eat before drinking. Having food in your stomach before drinking will help your brain receive its signal of fullness.
  • Sip your drink to make it last longer and keep water available to quench your thirstwhile you drink alcoholic beverages.
  • Whenever possible, select light beers, but be mindful that you are still drinking your calories.
  • Like wine? Try a wine spritzer, which can be as low as 49 calories and your waistline will thank you for it.

As with all things, drink alcohol in moderation and responsibly, it can help you achieve your weight loss goals.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

PMS Relief straight from the Kitchen

For many women, prior to experiencing their monthly menstrual cycle, is not only uncomfortable, but painful too.  PMS can cause a list of symptoms ranging from headaches, dizziness and cramps to irritability, bloating, and breast tenderness.  Fortunately, there are many age-old natural remedies to help alleviate the symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS).

Here are soPMS_147487465me home remedies found right in your kitchen to help keep you balanced:

  • From the cupboard- Try oatmeal, pasta, rye bread or basmati rice. They are enriched with magnesium, which is important for normal hormonal function. They also break down slowly and gradually release sugar into the bloodstream. The slow, steady release combats the sugar craving that comes with PMS.
  • Fruits & Produce- Avocados, dates, plums, eggplants, papayas, plantains, cherries and pineapple all contain serotonin which can supplement the mood-lifting brain chemical naturally produced by the body. Bananas are rich in potassium and can relieve bloating and swelling.
  • Seeds- Sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds are rich in omega-6 fatty acid, which may be missing in women who suffer from PMS.
  • Poultry- Chicken and turkey are rich in B6 and can help relieve depression. Vegetarian? Try other foods rich in B6 such as milk, brown rice, whole grains, soybeans, beans, walnuts, and green leafy vegetables.
  • Spice- Add a pinch of black pepper to 1 tablespoon aloe vera gel, and take three times a day with meals to relieve symptoms such as backache and abdominal pain. Aloe vera gel taken with a pinch of cumin may work well, too.

Along with a good night’s rest, trying some of these tips can make a big difference in finding comfort from an uncomfortable time many of us women may experience monthly.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Asthma in the Winter: Bundle up and Prevent your Symptoms

The cold weather has arrived and aside from worrying about the flu and other upper respiratory infections, people who have asthma should also worry about an increased risk of experiencing an asthma attack. Are you one of the 25.5 million people who have asthma? If so, follow these helpful tips to prevent triggering asthma symptoms or attacks in the cold weather.

 

  • Half hour prior to going out in the cold, take one or two puffs of your inhaler
  • Wrap up well and wear a scarf over your nose and mouth – this will help to warm up the air before you breathe it in.
  • Take extra care when exercising in cold weather. Warm up for 10-15 minutes and take one or two puffs of your inhaler before you start.
  • If possible, avoid fireplaces. As cozy as the thought of a warm fireplace may sound, the burning wood smoke from the fireplace can trigger asthma symptoms or an asthma attack.

Often times, pAsthma_176896123eople stop taking medications because they do not feel any symptoms. If you are on medicines for asthma, consult with your doctor to see if you should continue taking them even when you are asymptomatic.

Create your asthma action plan and share it with your close friends and family. It may be a good idea to make sure your friends and family know what to do if you have an asthma attack and what symptoms to look for such as: coughing more than usual, getting short of breath, wheezing or having difficulty speaking in full sentences.

 

Remember, prevention is key and you can breathe easy knowing your are taking a proactive approach to your asthma condition. By keeping these tips in mind, being consistent with treatments and bundling up in the cold weather, you can still enjoy the winter months.  If you need to speak to a physician about your asthma and plan of action, contact Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center to set an appointment at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Healthy Pregnancy over 35

More and more women are waiting to have families well into their late 30’s and beyond. According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in five women now wait until they’re 35 or older to have their first child. There may be some risks involved with a pregnancy conceived later in life, but a healthy lifestyle, along with regular visits to your Ob-Gyn can create a healthy pregnancy.

Oftentimes, women worry more about the risks of pregnancy at a later age than conception itself. While a woman’s fertility does decrease after the age of 30, certain risk factors associated with pregnancy do increase including:
• Higher risk of gestational diabetes and high blood pressure
• Greater risk of chromosomal abnormalities such as Down Syndrome
• Miscarriages and still birth
• Low birth weight

Later in Life PregnancyA pregnancy should be happy and welcomed news and planning should be no different. Increased risk factors and statistics should not be discouraging news. Often, statistics do not account for life style choices or pre-existing conditions. Here are a few tips to help you take the necessary steps toward a healthy pregnancy later in life:
• Schedule an appointment with your Ob-Gyn for a visit. Be very honest with your practitioner about any existing health conditions.
• Your Doctor may recommend additional testing such as genetic testing and counseling or sonograms.
• Begin taking pre-natal vitamin. Since folic-acid is important for prevention of birth defects, taking folic acid can add an important level of protection for older women.
• Exercise regularly; eat a well-balanced diet to maintain your weight. Gaining the appropriate amount of weight lessens the chance of your baby growing slowly and reduces the risk of preterm birth.
• Avoid smoking and drinking.

If you are interested in pre-pregnancy and fertility counseling, contact Jamaica Hospital Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276 to make an appointment.

For more information on health and fitness  find us on Facebook.com/JamaicaHospital.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Smoking Compromising your Auto-immune Health?

According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Surgeon General Report, there are more than 16 million people in America who already have at least one disease from smoking. As researchwoman-stops-smoking continues to examine the negative side effects of smoking, which can include cancers and respiratory diseases, there is another aspect of your health it may be affecting- your autoimmune system.

Cigarette smoke contains several toxic ingredients including: tars, nicotine, carbon monoxide and other unnatural chemicals. These toxic ingredients are difficult to break down and eliminate both in the body, when inhaled, and in the environment, when exhaled. In addition, these same toxins weaken the immune system.  With 1 out of 5 adults and teenagers smoking, researchers are noticing increased cases of autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, which can be triggered by smoking.

Lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease affecting mostly women, but does not discriminate; men can also fall prey to this disease. The reason one is diagnosed with lupus is still unknown.  However, doctors believe it may be a combination of genetics or the environment. With lupus, the immune system attacks healthy tissue in the body which can make one more susceptible to infections.  Since respiratory infections are among the most common, smoking cigarettes can increase the risk of pneumococcal pneumonia and chronic bronchitis in people diagnosed with lupus.

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) disease has no cure, only treated with medications and symptoms can vary from person to person, with the most common symptoms being long periods of joint pain and fatigue. Some people may have a genetic predisposition for RA, and smoking can increase the severity of its symptoms. Smoking can also interfere with the effectiveness of RA medication. Even if you are not genetically disposed to RA, chances are smoking can make you vulnerable to it- a good reason to quit smoking.

Don’t be among the 16 million. Choosing to make a lifestyle change can be difficult; Jamaica Hospital can help. If you are interested in creating a plan or participating in a smoking cessation group, please contact 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Focus on Dental Care:  Gum Disease- Sign & Symptoms

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), approximately half of the American population has gum disease or symptoms of it. Affecting women and men alike, no one is excluded from this possible diagnosis- even children are susceptible.

Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is a contagious bacterial infection that affects the gum tissues and bone that supports the teeth.  Many factors can increase the chances of developing gum disease, such as tobacco use, stress, poor diet, or even genetics.  The hardened plaque, called tartar or calculus, that builds up by the gum line can bring about gingivitis and spread into the underlying bone.  It can start slowly without any pain and may go unnoticed until there is pain.

Some of the symptoms of gum disease can include:

  • ReGum Disease_100727067d, swollen or tender gums/ Gums that bleed when brushing or flossing
  • Receding gums
  • Tooth sensitivity for no reason
  • Metallic taste
  • Chronic bad breath
  • Deep pockets (the space between gums and the teeth)

While practicing good dental hygiene, such as regular flossing and brushing after meals, can help slow the progression of such a disease, it is important to schedule regular dental check-ups to prevent gum disease or its progression.

Unfortunately, many people go to the dentist only when they experience some sort of pain or symptom. Don’t let this happen to you.  Keep on top of your oral health and make an appointment with your dentist every 6 months for a dental check- up and deep cleaning.  Contact Jamaica Hospital’s Dental Clinic to schedule your appointment at 718-206-6980.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is an Echocardiogram?

Has your doctor recommended an echocardiogram for you? No need to be alarmed. It’s not surgery, and it doesn’t hurt. An echocardiogram, or an ‘echo’, is an ultrasound for the heart that uses high-pitched sound waves sent through a device called a transducer. The device picks up echoes of the sound waves as they bounce off the different parts of your heart. These echoes are turned into moving pictures of your heart that can be seen on a video screen. It’s a simple procedure conducted by a trained sonographer which may take place in your doctor’s office, a hospital clinic or even in the emergency room.

There are different types of echo-cardiograms which are able to display the shape of your heart, how well it is functioning, whether you have a clot, or if there are any problems with your heart’s valves. Depending on what your doctor is looking for, your doctor may prescribe one of the following tests:

• Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE). This is the most common type. Views of the heart are obtained by moving the transducer to different locations on your chest or abdominal wall.Echo_521202511

• Stress echocardiogram. For this test, an echocardiogram is done both before and after your heart is stressed either by having you exercise or by injecting a medicine that makes your heart beat harder and faster to test your heart’s blood flow.

• Doppler echocardiogram. This test is used to look at how blood flows through the heart chambers, heart valves, and blood vessels. The ultrasound computer measures the direction and speed of the blood flowing through your heart and blood vessels.

• Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE). For this test, the probe is passed down the esophagus instead of being moved over the outside of the chest wall. TEE portray clearer pictures of your heart, because the probe is located closer to the heart, lungs, and bones of the chest wall, so it does not block the sound waves produced by the probe. A sedative and an anesthetic applied to the throat are used to make you comfortable during this test.

If you need to schedule an echo, or have any questions, please contact Jamaica Hospital’s Department of Cardiology at 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Type 1 Diabetes- What you should know?

78160636_T1DDiabetes is on the rise and what has significantly increased is the rate of type 1 diabetes (T1D), formerly known as “juvenile” or “juvenile onset” diabetes. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has found that more than 13,000 children and young people are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year.

T1D is often first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. However, people may develop T1D at any age. The exact cause of T1D is unknown, there is no cure and it cannot be outgrown. In most cases of T1D, the body’s own immune system, which normally fights harmful bacteria and viruses, mistakenly destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Doctors believe genetics may play a role in this process, and exposure to certain environmental factors, such as viruses, may trigger the disease.

The good news is that it can be controlled with insulin therapy, exercise and diet. Are you, or a family member, experiencing any of the following symptoms?
• Increased thirst
• Frequent urination
• Bedwetting in children who previously didn’t wet the bed during the night
• Extreme hunger
• Unintended weight loss
• Irritability and other mood changes
• Fatigue and weakness
• Blurred vision
• In females, frequent vaginal yeast infections

A simple blood test can identify type 1 diabetes. Be sure to consult with a physician if you or a family member is experiencing any of the above symptoms by contacting Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

High Blood Pressure? Make sure you read the labels on OTC Meds

Over the counter (OTC) remedies often seem like the way to alleviate allergy symptoms, headaches or common cold symptoms. However, it177013482_OTC Meds&BP is always important to read the labels of any OTC medicines, especially if you are taking medications to treat high blood pressure.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), are often used to relieve pain or reduce inflammation. Aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen, are OTC medicines, which are considered NSAIDs, and cause you to retain fluid and decrease kidney function, placing a greater stress on your heart or kidneys.

Believe it or not, many cough and cold medications contain NSAIDs to relieve decongestion and pain. Decongestants can make your blood pressure and heart rate rise and may prevent high blood pressure medications from working properly. Avoid using them and seek alternative ways to ease the symptoms of cold, flu, or sinus problems.

Do you suffer from migraines? Some migraine headache medications work by constricting blood vessels in your head, but the medication also constricts blood vessels throughout your body. This can raise blood pressure, perhaps to dangerous levels. If you have high blood pressure or any other type of heart disease, speak with your doctor before taking medication for migraines or severe headaches.

Trying to lose weight? Appetite suppressants tend to speed-up the body and can make your blood pressure rise, placing more stress on your heart. Before using any weight loss drug, whether prescription or over-the-counter, be sure to check with your doctor. These medications may do you more harm than good.

Read medication labels before buying over-the-counter preparations. Talk to your doctor before using any over-the-counter medication, herbal preparation, vitamins, or other nutritional supplements. Ask for alternatives to potentially harmful medicines. Give a list of all the medications you use, both prescription and over-the-counter, to every doctor you visit, including dosages. If you do not have a physician and would like set up an appointment to meet with one, please contact Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Center at 718-206- 7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Foods Should You Avoid During Pregnancy?

Pregnancy can bring about many physical and emotional changes, but another area of change may be in a pregnant woman’s diet.  What a woman eats during pregnancy is just as important as how much she should eat.

Pre-natal visits within the first trimester discuss choosing a healthy diet and foods to avoid that may pose any danger.
Some foods to avoid during pregnancy can include:
• Caffeine: 6-8 ounce cup of coffee per day may be ok, but it may be wiser to avoid caffeine altogether. Research has shown too much caffeine can increase the chances of a miscarriage within the first trimester.
• Alcohol: Once you confirm pregnancy, alcohol should be avoided at all costs. Alcohol crosses the placenta immediately. Drinking during pregnancy places your baby at risk for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, increasing their chances for learning disabilities, physical abnormalities, or disorders of the central nervous system.
• Fish: Certain types of fish contain high levels of mercury, which is dangerous for your unborn child. Fish that contain high mercury levels are: shark, tilefish, king mackerel, swordfish, and albacore tuna. If you would like to have fish, try salmon or tuna in a limited amount.
• Lunch meats and soft unpasteurized cheeses: Deli lunch meats or cheeses such as Brie, goat cheese, feta, queso blanco, or blue cheese can be unpasteurized and can be contaminated with a bacterium called listeria, which can trigger food poisoning. Try to avoid them, especially during the first trimester. Pregnant women have a weakened immune system and can be more prone to food-borne illnesses.
• Unprepared Eggs: Eggs are good for you. It’s encouraged to eat them since they are a good source of protein, choline, vitamins B12, A, and E. It’s the foods containing undercooked or raw eggs which should be avoided such as runny breakfast eggs, egg nog, home-made ice cream, mousse, raw cookie or cake batter or even caesar salad dressing. You can run the risk of being contaminated with salmonella.

The most important thing to keep in mind is eating healthy. Minor eliminations in your diet during pregnancy will help bring in a happy and healthy baby. Speak with your OB about foods to avoid.

If you are not receiving prenatal care, make an appointment with Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.