Breastfeeding: What is a normal lactation flow?

As a first time mother, there are so many decisions to make upon receiving your little bundle of joy, the choice to breastfeed is one of them. Often, first time mothers are concerned if their infant is receiving enough milk. Here are a few breastfeeding facts that can help ease any concerns or anxieties you may have about your choice to breastfeed trust that you are providing the best for your infant.

  • You produce a small amount of milk in the first few days aftBF_ThinkstockPhotos-146068069er birth. This milk is called ‘Colostrum’. It is only produced in small amounts because that is all your baby needs. Your infant has a very small stomach- about the size of your thumb- and the colostrum you produce will help your baby’s immune system.
  • You will produce more milk after the third or fourth day. If you are pumping, the amount you create could possibly be anywhere from a half ounce to one ounce per breast or per feeding. Do not become discouraged if this is all you are producing or if your baby seems to want more after an hour and half or two. Breast milk is digested quickly and breastfed babies tend to eat more often than formula fed babies.
  • Your breast size does not determine the amount of milk you can produce. You are able to breast feed or pump and you will produce what is necessary- it’s all about supply and demand. The more you pump or breastfeed, the more milk your body will produce.
  • Find time to relax and ensure you are maintaining a healthy diet. This will go a long way to helping your lactation flow. A relaxed and well-fed body will make it easier to create a sense of ‘let down’, also known as milk ejection.

For more information about breastfeeding, please contact Jamaica Hospital Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276 and speak to a lactation consultant.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Spring Cleaning? Take Precaution When Using Your Cleaning Supplies

ThinkstockPhotos-467912941Spring cleaning offers an opportunity to get rid of old things and bring a sense of refreshment to your environment, but the process may not always be so pleasant to the senses. Often times, household cleaning products can irritate the eyes, nose and throat and trigger allergic reactions or even an asthma attack.

Sneezing, coughing and itchy skin can be symptoms traced back to chemical allergies found in everyday cleaning products.  We are exposed to hundreds of different chemicals in the products used every day to clean our homes, cars, or offices. If you read the list of ingredients in these cleaning products, you may be surprised to find that many of these ingredients are potentially toxic chemicals which can trigger asthma attacks.

According to the AmThinkstockPhotos-153187215erican Lung Association, some products release dangerous chemicals, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Other harmful ingredients include ammonia and bleach. VOCs and other chemicals released when using cleaning supplies contribute to chronic respiratory problems, allergic reactions and headaches.

Cleaning products containing VOCs and other toxic substances can include:

  • Air fresheners
  • Chlorine bleach
  • Detergent and dish washing liquid
  • Dry cleaning chemicals
  • Rug and upholstery cleaners
  • Furniture and floor polish
  • Oven cleaners

The American Lung Association suggests reading all labels on cleaning supplies and household products before you buy them. Choose products that do not contain or have reduced amounts of VOCs, fragrances, irritants and flammable ingredients. Products that are labeled “green” do not necessarily mean they are safer.

As a safer cleaning alternative, warm water and soap often will do the trick, especially at home. Baking soda is good for scrubbing. A mix of vinegar and water can clean glass.

Another helpful tip: when using cleaning or household products, keep the area well ventilated. Never use cleaning products in a small, enclosed space and open windows and doors.

Happy and safe cleaning and enjoy your new clean space!

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is an allergic reaction?

Your own asthma allergyimmune system is what really causes allergic reactions.  Grass and tree pollen’s, ragweed, dust- it mistakes these harmless allergens for a serious threat and attacks them. The sneezing, watery eyes or coughing are the result of your body mistakenly attacking itself. It begins with exposure to the allergen. Even if you’ve inhaled an allergen many times before with no trouble, at some point, the body flags it as an invader. The immune system studies the allergen and readies itself for the next exposure by developing antibodies; you are now “sensitized” to the allergen.

If you are having trouble finding relief from allergies, contact Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center and set an appointment with one of our physicians for help at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Does Stress Affect Your Eating Patterns?

A hormone secreted by the hypothalamus called cortisol in times of stress can lead people, more often women than men, to stress eat.  The next time you catch yourself stress eating, try these helpful tips to prevent hitting the bottom of the snack bag:Stress Eat-158672035

  • Meditation
  • Exercise
  • Social Support

Your body will thank you for it.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is causing the ringing in your ears?

Many of us will hear it from time to time. Only you can hear it- a ringing in your ear that may come and go.  The medical term for it: tinnitus. According to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD), about 10% of adults in America have experienced tinnitus lasting at least five minutes in the past year.

Some of the causes you may experience ringing in your ears can be:

  • Trauma to the ear. This can include listening to your music loudly. The recommended listening should be at less than 90 decibels according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) guidelines.
  • Wax Build- up. Some people produce more ear wax than others. Instead of using Q-Tips, try softening the ear wax with peroxide or mineral oil and allow the wax to dissolve and drain.Ear Ringing-181524972
  • Excessive use of certain medicines such as aspiring or antibiotics.
  • Too much caffeine, nicotine, or alcohol, have also been known to cause ringing in the ears as well.

Is the ringing persistent? Contact Jamaica Hospital’s ambulatory care center and set an appointment to see a physician at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Importance of Wound Care as a Diabetic

Cuts and scrapes may not seem like a big deal for most people but for diabetics, healing can often become complicated due to their immune systems becoming compromised. For diabetics, careful monitoring of healing wounds is important to prevent bigger health issues down the line.

If you’re a diabetic, try these helpful tips to prevent a small problem from becoming more complicated:

  • Should you get aThinkstockPhotos-486206293 (1) cut, treat it immediately. Cleanse the affected area with soap and water daily. Dry the area well after washing, and apply an antibiotic ointment to keep the site germ-free. Skin injuries generally heal within two weeks, but cuts may take up to three weeks to heal in people with diabetes. Anything beyond that is excessive, and you should have your physician look at it again.
  • Keep pressure off the wound. “Make sure you’re not stepping directly on your wound,” says Dr. Andrew Rubin, Podiatrist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center. “A podiatrist can help you fabricate a pad so you’re not stepping on it. Pressure can increase the time it takes to heal,” he added.
  • Be aware of the signs of an infection. Symptoms can include pain, redness, or warmth at the site of the infection. Drainage is another sign of an infection. Don’t ignore any of these signs. Get treatment promptly.

Remember that even a small scrape can become serious if you don’t take proper care of it. Left untreated, wounds can lead to an amputation in the most serious of cases. Taking good care of yourself is an important step toward preventing wounds.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Smoking & Your Dental Health

With smoking, we tend to focus on the effects it may have on the lungs or the heart. However, we don’t focus on the health effects it may have on other parts of the body including your oral health.

The American Cancer Society states that smokers are six times more likely than non-smokers to develop c453877721ancers of the mouth, lips, tongue, and throat. In addition, smoking can cause many serious problems for teeth and oral structures. It can interfere with the normal function of gum tissue cells; this can make smokers more susceptible to infections, gum disease, or even periodontal disease. The problem can be further exacerbated when proper dental health care is not followed. The excess of harmful chemicals in cigarette smoke makes smokers twice more likely to suffer tooth loss than non-smokers.

Keep your winning smile and kick the smoking habit. For help to quit smoking, please contact Jamaica Hospital’s smoking cessation support group at 718-206-8494.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Benefits of “De-cluttering” Your Life

Life is busy. Often times, we tend to neglect our home, office space, or car and allow items to pile up. Things once considered a ‘project’ no longer continue to be a ‘work in progress’. It becomes a part of your everyday life and clutters your space.  Did you know that clutter can lead to a stressful lifestyle? Take a moment to “de-clutter”- your mental, and physical, health may depend on it.

Clutter is an excessive viClutter_176640492sual and physical stimulation.  A study conducted by neuroscientists at the Princeton University Neuroscience Institute observed people’s task performance in an organized versus disorganized environment. The results of the study exhibited that physical clutter in your surroundings competes for your attention, resulting in decreased performance and increased stress.

Stress can reveal itself in various ways demonstrating physical, emotional, behavioral and even cognitive symptoms. These symptoms can include being moody and frustrated, feeling overwhelmed, inability to focus, forgetfulness, and even procrastination. Long term health effects of stress can affect your mental health creating depression and anxiety. Physical stress can suppress the immune system causing fatigue and high blood pressure.

What can you do to “de-clutter”? Some helpful suggestions are:Clutter_89880708

  • Create a three pile system – place items that are cluttering your space into three categories: keep trash or donate. Try using this system once a month or even once a week- this can enhance mental clarity; this is a good idea for home and work.
  • Clear your desk before going home – make sure to file away certain items in a designated area, shred documents you no longer need, and create a ‘To-Do’ list to remind you of the things you need to tackle the following day.
  • Set an alarm – setting an alarm reminds you to carve out a designated time to clear out a specific area, either in your home or office or car. It can make all the difference to avoid wasting your precious time out with your family and friends.

A little time spent organizing can go a long way in providing some peace of mind, creating clarity and focus on the more important things in your life and career.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Avoiding Mastitis while Breastfeeding

BreastFeeding_476894625Breastfeeding can be a wonderful bonding experience for mother and baby. It can also pose a few obstacles including mastitis. Mastitis is an infection caused by a clogged duct in the nipple of a nursing mother.  Here is some information about mastitis and some helpful tips on how to prevent it.

Mastitis won’t hurt your baby but it can reduce the milk supply in the affected breast.It can happen to occur when bacteria enters the breast through a cracked or sore nipple. It can start as a painful area in one breast and may be red or warm to the touch or both and can be accompanied by fever, chills, and body aches.

Try to avoid mastitis by following a few of these helpful tips:

  • Get plenty of rest and eat a healthy, balanced diet while you are nursing.
  • Try your best to avoid letting your breasts become overly full or engorged.
  • If your breasts are not empty after nursing or pumping, or you have a plugged duct, use warm compresses and massage to get the milk out.
  • Avoid under-wire bras and bras that are too small.

If you are beginning to feel the symptoms of mastitis, continue to breast feed as you normally would but make sure to see your doctor. Applying warm compresses for several minutes before each feeding will help alleviate any pain. Antibiotics may be prescribed, but pain should subside within one to two days after taking you prescriptions.

If you feel you may need help breastfeeding, contact Jamaica Hospital Women’s Health Center to speak with our lactation consultant at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How much Bacteria is your Baby’s Pacifier Holding?

Jamaica Hospital NewsletterThe pacifier is the saving grace for many new parents to soothe their crying baby. However, what parents may not know are the germs harbored on the pacifier could be causing more harm than good to their baby’s health. If you have noticed your child is more prone to being diagnosed with strep throat and ear infections, the pacifier maybe the culprit.

Germs are not just on the surface of the pacifier. The porous rubber top of the pacifier is likely to grow bacteria from the inside out.  Research conducted at the Tulsa Wellness Care Center found standard lab cultures produced strep bacteria, various strains of staph and the bacteria that cause pneumonia. The pacifier samples also produced the yeast that causes thrush. Thinking you can clean or disinfect the pacifier for continual use? Not necessarily. Even after washing and boiling a pacifier, these bacterias build a resistance under a complex structure called ‘biofilm’ and continue to harbor and grow. Surprisingly, the life expectancy of a pacifier, even after continual cleaning and “disinfecting”, is only two weeks.

So after this information, what should a parent fdo? Quit cold turkey? Cry it out? Here are a few helpful tips to ease the distress for both parent and baby:

  • Take it away early- newborns have a sucking reflex due to hunger, but by three months of age, it’s non-nutritive. Instead, try soothing your baby rocking or holding them.
  • Make it taste bad- Once they are older, they have developed their taste buds and are biased to certain tastes. Parents have tried vinegar or lemon to make it taste bad, but once it becomes unappealing, your child may be pacifier-free.
  • Take it away gradually- using it only for naps can be helpful and then gradually letting go the need for it.
  • Cut the tops off of the pacifier- an unconventional method, but possibly helpful. Place them strategically where he or she may find them and they will realize they are no longer able to use.

A healthy, happy baby will appreciate your caution in the long run.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.