Reading or Prescription Eyeglasses

If your vision is blurred or you are having issues with your sight, an eye doctor will conduct a regular exam, assessing your overall eye health.  At the end of the exam, it may be suggested that you are in need of glasses.  If you do not have a serious eye condition, the doctor may suggest magnifiers or over the counter (OTC) “readers.”

When making the decision to get glasses, many people wonder if there is difference between prescription lenses and OTC glasses.  The answer is, yes.

Some differences between OTC and prescription glasses are:

  • Over the counter (OTC) readers are best used for age-related presbyopia. Presbyopia is an age-related issue where your eyes become less flexible, making it harder to focus on close objects.
  • OTC readers have the same prescription in each lens. Having the same eyesight in both eyes is extremely rare. Therefore, your vision will not be properly corrected and you may still experience difficulty focusing even when wearing OTC readers.
  • Prescriptions glasses offer more options and benefits, such as quality in materials, accurate vision correction, lens clarity, as well as scratch and glare resistance.  Additionally, unlike OTC readers, prescription glasses can help with astigmatism, myopia or glaucoma.

If you are having difficulty with your vision, you should schedule an appointment to have your eyes examined.  To schedule an appointment with the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ophthalmology Center call 718-206-5900.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Summer Migraines

For many people who are prone to migraine headaches, summer can be the season when they are most affected. This doesn’t mean having to stay indoors to avoid symptoms, but instead learning the causes of migraines and taking precautions they should be taking to prevent them.

Migraine headaches are caused by changes in the brain that are brought on by several factors which include stress, hormonal changes, lack of sleep and food allergies. Factors that occur most commonly in summer include:

  • Changes in the weather
  • Sensitivity to bright light
  • Excessive heat and humidity
  • Changes in barometric pressure
  • Dehydration

In order to help prevent some of the causes of summer migraines, one can follow these helpful tips:

  • Make sure that you are drinking water adequately and frequently
  • Avoid beverages containing caffeine and alcohol
  • Wear a hat to keep the sun’s strong rays from your head and eyes
  • Protect your eyes with a good pair of sunglasses
  • Minimize the amount of time spent outdoors during the hottest part of the day
  • Do your errands during the cooler times of the day, if this is not possible, try to take breaks when you can and move into a cooler place.

People who experience frequent summer migraines don’t have to spend the summer indoors. If they take adequate precautions, they too can enjoy their time outdoors.

Speak to your physician if you experience frequent migraines at any time of the year and would like recommendations on  how to manage them. To make an appointment to see a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Signs of Poor Circulation You Should Not Ignore

The circulatory system consists of our heart, lungs and blood vessels; all of which are responsible for transporting blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout our bodies.

When our circulatory system is not functioning well, and blood flow has decreased, we may experience symptoms that include:

  • Muscle cramps
  • Numbness or tingling in hands and feet
  • Cold hands and feet
  • Problems getting or keeping an erection
  • Memory loss or difficulty concentrating
  • Slow healing of wounds
  • Varicose veins
  • Fatigue
  • Edema (the accumulation of fluid in certain parts of the body)

The symptoms of poor circulation should not be ignored as they are sometimes indicative of serious health problems such as:

  • Diabetes
  • Blood clots
  • Atherosclerosis
  • Peripheral artery disease
  • Hypertension

Ignoring symptoms and delaying care can be detrimental to your health. If you are experiencing symptoms that are associated with poor circulation, notify your healthcare provider immediately.  Your doctor can conduct a physical examination or order tests to determine the cause and provide appropriate treatment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a condition that is characterized by raised, red scaly patches. It is  often found on the scalp, knees and elbows, but can show up on other parts of the body as well of people who have the disease. The exact cause is not known but there is a correlation between genetics and also the body’s immune system. Psoriasis is a condition where the skin cells multiply at a faster rate than normal cells. This causes a buildup up skin lesions and the area of the body also feels warmer because it contains more blood vessels.   

Psoriasis is not contagious so it does not get passed by coming in to contact with a person who has it. It is a condition that affects men and women equally and  it can develop at any age, most commonly between the ages of 15 and 35.

Common signs of psoriasis include:

  • red patches of skin with thick silvery scales
  • cracked and dry skin that may bleed
  • stiff joints that may be swollen
  • itching, burning and soreness
  • nails that are pitted, thick and ridged

There are certain risk factors for developing psoriasis.  This includes stress, smoking, obesity, alcoholism, skin infections, a vitamin D deficiency, and a family history. Psoriasis is diagnosed by examining the skin and making a diagnosis. A dermatologist will be able to determine if it is psoriasis by the amount of thickness and redness it has. There are different types of psoriasis and they are classified by how they show up on the skin.

There are three ways that treatment for psoriasis can be approached. They can be used by themselves or together, depending on the severity. Topical creams and ointments that contain corticosteroids are usually the most commonly prescribed medications for mild to moderate conditions. Light therapy that is either natural or artificial ultraviolet light  can be used and it is directed at the area of the body that is affected. In severe cases, medications that are either injected or taken orally may be required. There are also alternative treatments that are being used and this includes Aloe vera which comes from a plant and   omega-3 fatty acids that comes from fish oils.

Depending on the severity of the disease, it may have an impact on a person’s quality of life. If you would like to schedule an appointment with a dermatologist at Jamaica Hospital for any type of skin condition, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Swimmers Ear

Swimmer’s ear is a bacterial infection that affects the outermost portion of the ear canal. A common cause is the accumulation of water in this portion of the canal that leads to a bacterial infection. It can also be caused by the insertion of unclean foreign objects into the ear that irritate the lining of the ear canal.
Signs and symptoms of swimmer’s ear are:
• Redness in the ear canal
• Itchiness in the ear
• Fluid discharge which may include pus
• Muffled hearing
• Sensation of fullness in the ear
• Fever if the infection is severe
A few factors that can make a person more susceptible to swimmer’s ear are:
• Swimming in water that isn’t clean
• Having a narrow ear canal
• Abrasion of the ear canal by improper use of a cotton swab
• Reduced production or improper removal of ear wax
It is important to treat swimmer’s ear as soon as possible in order to prevent serious complications such as hearing loss. Depending on the severity of the problem, treatment options are ear drops containing antibiotics,  steroid, and a mild acidic solution.  Have your physician evaluate the problem as soon as possible. If you would like to make an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Tips For The Hurricane Season

While we typically associate the summer with delightful temperatures, this time of year can also bring dangerous weather conditions, namely hurricanes.

With a long history of providing relief to places previously devastated by hurricanes, including sending personnel to assist the victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Maria, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is experienced and knowledgeable about how to properly prepare for such an event. Our hospital would like to share the following safety tips with our community:

  • In case of a need to evacuate, know where the nearest evacuation route is located
  • Keep a supply of non-perishable food that doesn’t require refrigeration or cooking
  • In an easy to locate area of your home keep flashlights, extra batteries, extra cash, a first aid kit, basic tools, charged cell phones and chargers, and a battery operated radio
  • Make sure you have a seven day supply of prescription medications
  • Have a three day supply of drinking water, one gallon per day per person.
  • Fill a bathtub with water to use to flush toilets
  • Make sure that all of your important documents are kept in a place that is high above ground level. Always keep a copy of these documents with you if there is a need to evacuate
  • Give everyone in your household a list of people they should contact in case of an emergency
  • Have a plan to protect your pets and have extra food for them
  • Prepare to put outdoor furniture away or at least firmly secured

By being prepared and following these tips, you can help keep your home and your loved ones safe from disaster.

For more information, please visit https://www.ready.gov/hurricanes and www.fema.gov

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.