What is Exertional Asthma ?

Do your asthma attacks coincide with participation in physical activity such as exercise? As in all types of asthma, as the airways tighten, it becomes  difficult to take a complete breath, and the airways produce extra mucous.

 

The symptoms of exertional asthma include:

  •  Wheezing
  •     Tightness of the chest
  •      Coughing
  •      Feeling tired
  •      Inability to catch your breath

Some activities that can lead to heavier than normal breathing such as recreational sports including:  running, basketball, football, soccer, and aerobic exercise. These can lead to exertional asthma.  Additionally, when the air is cold and dry, activities such as shoveling snow or walking for long periods of time can also trigger an asthma attack.

Other contributing factors of exertional asthma can include:

  •  Smoke or smog
  •     High pollen counts
  •     Having a cold or other respiratory infection
  •     Chlorinated pools or other chemical irritants

Treatment of exertional asthma includes taking medications both on a regular basis and  prior to doing strenuous exercise to limit symptoms and control breathing. Some activities and sports should be avoided if they bring on asthma attacks.

If you are experience difficulty breathing while participating in strenuous activities, you should consult with a pulmonary specialist for a complete respiratory evaluation. Please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Is Your Child’s Rash Due To Fifth Disease?

Fifth disease, also known as erythema infectiosum, is a contagious viral infection that is most common in school-age children.  The disease produces a rash on the face and body of those who have it.

Jamaica Hospital shares that a child with a red rash on their cheeks may have fifth disease

The feature that sets fifth disease apart from other types of rashes, such as rubella or scarlet fever is the distinctive, sudden appearance of bright red cheeks, commonly referred to as a “slapped cheek” rash. This can followed by a second rash a few days later on the chest, back, buttocks, arms and legs. The rash may be itchy, especially on the soles of the feet. It can vary in intensity and usually goes away in seven to 10 days, but it can come and go for several weeks.

Other symptoms of fifth disease are usually mild and may include:

  • Fever
  • Runny nose
  • Headache
  • Pain and swelling in the joints

Fifth disease is transmitted from person to person by respiratory secretions, such as saliva, sputum, or nasal mucus when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The incubation period is usually four to 14 days, but can be as long as 21 days. Those with fifth’s disease are most contagious when symptoms resemble that of a fever or a cold. By the time a rash appears they are no longer contagious.

There is no vaccine or medicine that can prevent fifth disease. You can reduce your chance of being infected or infecting others by:

  • Washing your hands often with soap and water
  • Covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick
  • Staying home when you are sick

Treatment for fifth disease typically involves taking over the counter medications to relieve symptoms, such as fever, itching, and joint pain.

To make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Pediatric Ambulatory Care Center, please call 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Can Diabetes Affect Your Sense of Hearing?

More than 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease that inhibits the body’s ability to produce and manage insulin appropriately, causing glucose to build up in the bloodstream instead of feeding hungry cells.

If you have diabetes, you should be aware of how it can impact your hearing as research has indicated that diabetics have a higher probability of developing hearing loss than those without the disease.

diabets and hearing loss, Jamaica Hospital

Multiple studies in recent years have examined the relationship between diabetes and hearing loss. In one study conducted by the National Institute of Health (NIH) those with diabetes were found to be more than twice as likely to have mild to moderate hearing loss than those without the disease. A separate study published by the Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism analyzed the results of more than 20,000 participants and concluded that diabetics were more likely to have hearing loss than those without the disease, regardless of their age.

While researchers are uncertain as to exactly how diabetes negatively impacts our sense of hearing, most believe that high blood glucose levels cause damage to the small blood vessels in the inner ear.

Our inner ears are lined with hair cells called stereocilia. These hairs cells are responsible for translating the noise our ears collect into electrical impulses, which are then sent to the brain where we process them into recognizable sounds.  Like other parts of the body, these hair cells require good circulation to function. If damaged, these cells cannot regenerate and hearing loss would be permanently affected.

With a higher likelihood of developing hearing loss, it is recommended that diabetics take certain precautions to avoid damaging these cells, including:

  • Turning down the volume on personal electronic devices and limiting the use of devices that require headphones or earbuds
  • Protecting your ears from excessive noise with earplugs if you engage in noisy hobbies or attend loud events.
  • Incorporating an appropriate amount of exercise into your daily routine. Even a moderate amount improves circulation and blood flow.
  • Maintaining an appropriate weight. Excessive weight makes it more difficult for your heart to pump blood effectively to all parts of your body, including your ears.

Most importantly, you should schedule a hearing evaluation regularly with your doctor if you have diabetes.

To speak to a doctor about how to better manage your diabetes, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WellnessWednesday Tips

When seeking to achieve a wellness lifestyle, try to keep it simple.

Some simple ways you can bring more wellness into your life are:

  • Drink more fluids
  • Remember to eat a healthy breakfast daily
  • Make a list of goals you’d like to meet
  • Keep healthy snacks on hand so that you do not become too hungry
  • Move around during the course of the day. Take a brisk walk or just get up from your desk chair and stretch
  • Get enough sleep.  It is recommended that six to eight hours of sleep is beneficial
  • Make time for yourself (meditation, yoga, exercise, prayer)
  • Organize and de-clutter your life and surroundings

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Meet Our Doctors: Dr. Rebecca Winderman

Pediatric Gastroenterologist In QueensJamaica Hospital would like to introduce you to our new Pediatric Gastroenterologist, Dr. Rebecca Winderman.

Since joining Jamaica Hospital in November of 2018 Dr. Winderman has dedicated her time to not only expanding the GI services offered at the hospital, but also educating her colleagues and the community about the various gastrointestinal issues that can affect children, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), liver disease and allergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus (EOE).

One of the reasons Dr. Winderman came to Jamaica Hospital was she recognized a need in the community for a Pediatric GI program.  Many of the services she now offers at Jamaica Hospital were not otherwise offered in Queens That’s why she is excited to be able to offer care at Jamaica Hospital.

According to Dr. Winderman, “My primary goal is to gain the trust of my patients and their parents because treating pediatric GI issues is often a long journey. By working with parents on a treatment plan that includes various forms of therapies and nutritional programs, I am confident that together we can effectively manage these conditions and prevent the long-term complications they can have on a child’s growth and development.”

Dr. Winderman currently sees patients at the following locations:

TJH Pediatrics
89-06 135 Street – Suite 7T
Jamaica, NY 11418
718-206-7591
Jamaica Hospital Ambulatory Care Center
8900 Van Wyck Expressway
Jamaica, NY 11418
718-206-7001

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy SymptomsMany people enjoy spending time outside during the summer. With more time spent outdoors, there is an increased risk of exposure to plants that can cause allergic reactions.  The most common plants of this kind are poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac; all of which grow in wooded or vegetated areas and contain urushiol.

Urushiol is an oily resin found in the leaves, stems and roots of each plant. When this substance comes in contact with our skin, it can lead to a reaction we know as poison ivy rash. An allergic reaction typically occurs 24 to 48 hours after exposure and symptoms can last up to two or three weeks.  Symptoms can be mild or severe and may include:

  • Redness
  • Blistering
  • Itching
  • Swelling

There are several ways to minimize our exposure and reaction to plants that can cause poison ivy rash.  We can:

  • Learn to identify poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac
  • Steer clear of these plants by avoiding areas in which they grow
  • Wear protective clothing such as long sleeves and pants
  • Immediately wash areas that have been exposed with soap and water
  • Bathe pets that have been exposed

Approximately 60 to 80% of people who are exposed to urushiol will have a reaction.  For mild cases, taking cool showers and applying soothing topical treatments such as calamine lotion is recommended.  In severe cases, doctors may prescribe pills or creams that contain steroids or antihistamines.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Conditions That Can Affect Your Sense of Smell

Ear Nose and Throat Doctor in Jamaica Queens Every year, thousands of people lose their ability to smell.  According to the National Institutes of Health, 12% of adults in the United States have had some loss of their sense of smell.

A loss of smell can significantly affect a person’s quality of life.  Because smell and taste are linked, most people with a smell disorder are unable to properly taste their food.  Most importantly, they may not be able to detect smells that warn of danger such as smoke or gas.

The inability to smell is typically the result of a problem occurring in the nose, brain or nervous system. One’s loss of smell can be partial or reduced (hyposmia) or complete (anosmia).  In both cases, a loss of smell can be temporary or permanent.

Several conditions can lead to hyposmia; they include:

  • Colds
  • Nasal allergies
  • Flu
  • Hay fever
  • Sinus infection
  • Deviated septum
  • Hormonal imbalances

Anosmia can develop as a result of:

  • Head trauma
  • Upper respiratory viral infections
  • Nasal/ sinus diseases
  • Nasal polyps
  • Bone deformities of the nose
  • Alzheimer’s disease

If you have lost or have had a decline in your ability to smell, you should see a doctor immediately.   Your doctor can perform a physical examination, review your medical history and request a series of tests to determine possible causes. Treatment for smell disorders is based on underlying causes and can include medication or surgery.

To schedule an appointment with an Ear, Nose and Throat doctor at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7110.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Relationship Between Asthma and GERD

There is strong evidence that a relationship exists between asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). According to research, more than 75 percent of people living with asthma have GERD. The reason for this is not certain but studies show a relationship between stomach acid and airways.

GERD which is the reverse flow of stomach acid into the esophagus seems to worsen asthma. One explanation as to why this happens may involve stomach acid which flows back in to the esophagus irritating the throat, the airways and the lungs. It is also a possibility that the acid affects a nerve in the esophagus which causes the lungs to tighten.

Ways to avoid the effects of GERD include:

  • Raising the head of the bed by 6 inches to keep stomach acid from flowing back in to the esophagus
  • Waiting three to four hours after eating a meal before laying down
  • Eating smaller meals
  • Keeping your weight under control
  • Quitting smoking
  • Avoid eating fatty food, chocolate, spicy foods, citrus fruits, tomato sauce,  coffee, tea, or alcohol before laying down

Speak to your physician about treatment options that may be best for you. You can also schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center by calling 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Retinal Detachment

retina, retinaldetachment, eyeexam, ophthalmology

 

According to the Mayo Clinic, retinal detachment is an emergency situation in which a thin layer of tissue (the retina) at the back of the eye pulls away from its underlying support tissue.

The warning signs of retinal detachment are:

  • The appearance of tiny specks that seem to drift through your field of vision commonly referred to as floaters
  • Flashes of light in one or both eyes
  • Blurred vision
  • A gradual reduction in peripheral or side vision
  • A shadow over the visual field

There are three different types of retinal detachment:

Rhegamtogeneous – The most common type of detachment which occures slowly over time.

Tractional – A detachment that occurs when there is scar tissue growing on the retina’s surface

Exudative – Occurs when fluid accumulates beneath the retna without any tears or holes in the retna.

Aging and family history of retinal detachment are the most common risk factors for this condition. Those who already have a retinal detachment in one eye, have severe nearsightedness, have had previous eye surgery, have received a trauma to the eye or have an eye disorder that thins the retina are equally at risk.

Retinal detachment is an emergency so if you are experiencing flashes of light, floaters or a darkening of your field of vision, you will want to contact your eye doctor immediately.  If a detachment isn’t repaired, you may have permanent vision loss.

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms of retinal detachment or would like to schecule an eye exam, please call the Jamaica Hospital Ophthalmology Center at 718-206-5900 for an appointment.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What Are the Symptoms Of A Pinched Nerve?

Jamaica Hospital, Pinched Nerve

Our nerves are specialized cells that carry important messages throughout our bodies in the form of tiny electrical signals.  When too much pressure is applied to our nerves by surrounding tissues, ligaments or bones, it can result in a pinched – or compressed nerve.

A pinched nerve can occur in various parts of our bodies and they can cause radiating pain, tingling, numbness or weakness. Damage from a pinched nerve may be minor or severe. It may cause temporary or long-lasting problems.

Pinched nerve signs and symptoms include:

  • Numbness or decreased sensation in the area supplied by the nerve
  • Sharp, aching or burning pain, which may radiate outward
  • Tingling, pins and needles sensations
  • Muscle weakness in the affected area
  • Frequent feeling that a foot or hand has “fallen asleep”

Symptoms may worsen when attempting certain movements, such as turning your head or straining your neck. Problems may also become worse while sleeping.

Certain medical conditions can contribute to the development of a pinched nerve. These include:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Thyroid disease
  • Pregnancy

A pinched nerve can also occur as the result of an injury or from repetitive activities. Conversely, long periods of inactivity or lying down can also cause the problem.

Maintaining a healthy weight, stretching regularly, avoiding repetitive motions and practicing good posture are some tips to avoid developing a pinched nerve.

With rest and other conservative treatments, such as taking over-the-counter medications, most people recover from a pinched nerve within a few days or weeks

See your doctor if the signs and symptoms of a pinched nerve last longer or don’t respond to self-care measures.  Your doctor can provide treatment options to shrink swollen tissue around the nerve. Treatment options may include anti-inflammatory medications, steroid injections, physical therapy, or surgery.

To make an appointment to see a doctor at Jamaica Hospital to treat a pinched nerve, please call 718-206-7001.

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.