We Will Never Forget 9/11

“I want them to know they will never be forgotten,” is what Jamaica Hospital’s Vinny Barranco EMTP Supervisor wants people to remember.

Vinny was one of the emergency responders that raced to the World Trade Center 16 years ago on the tragic day of 9/11. We sat with him as he shared his story of this very sad day in our nation’s history.  Here are details from our interview:

Where were you when you first heard we were being attacked?

Vinny: I was in the hospital’s garage getting ready to head out on the road.

What were you feeling?

Vinny: My feelings came in different stages. Just a flood of emotions; I was angry, I felt sorrow- my heart was breaking. Our guys felt the same way but we knew we had a mission. We knew that we had to get to World Trade Center at any cost and by any means.  We were determined to get out there and do everything that we could do to help. Our hearts were heavy but that did not stop us. We had guys that were off duty calling in saying, “I’m going in.”   Jamaica Hospital tried to fit as many emergency responders possible in each ambulance.  It was all hands on deck. Our mechanics made sure that everything that was mobile was ready to go, our ambulances, our mobile health clinics

How did you feel when you arrived at the World Trade Center after the attacks?

Vinny: When I arrived, I was just in disbelief of what I was seeing.  This was not the New York City I know. I did not resemble my New York, It resembled a war zone.  When we looked at the World Financial Center there was total devastation. It’s just hard to put in words what we saw.

What would you like survivors and those who lost loved ones to this tragedy to know?

Vinny: On 9/11 I lost friends.  We lost employees from Jamaica Hospital. It’s hard knowing they are gone. It is heart-wrenching.  We want everyone who was affected by this tragedy to know that their loved ones will never be forgotten.   This is the reason why I volunteer at the Tribute Center because I want them to know to know we will never forget.

Vinny volunteers at the 9/11 Tribute Museum; He devotes his spare time to taking guests on tours and sharing his story.  Vinny helps visitors to understand and remember the events that took place on 9/11. He knows that by doing so, he is doing his part in keeping the memories of those who perished alive.

At Jamaica Hospital we will never forget and recognize the courage of emergency responders and others who helped people affected by 9/11. On this day, please join Jamaica Hospital as we remember those we lost.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month – an observance that coincides with the return of children to the classroom. This convergence of events leads many parents to ask one question, “how can I ensure that my child receives a nutritious diet now that they are back in school?”

Obesity rates among children have tripled over the past three decades. It’s now estimated that 16% of children are classified as obese. It is also estimated that children who are obese are ten times more likely to become obese as adults than other children. Since most children consume half of their daily caloric intake while in school, concentrating on providing them with a healthy and balanced diet while they are there is essential in the battle against obesity.

For many parents, the decision of whether to pack lunch from home or buy lunch from school is a difficult one. Some parents question the nutritional value of school lunches. Parents who have this concern should know that in recent years, schools have implemented new standards for the nutritional value of meals to align with U.S. dietary guidelines. Processed lunches that used to be high in fat, sugar, and sodium have been replaced with meals that meet or exceed national standards. School meals now also feature a variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and low or fat-free milk.

For those who still opt to pack their child’s lunch, they can improve their child’s diet and reduce their chances of becoming obese by following some simple tips:

  • Choose whole wheat breads instead of white bread when making sandwiches
  • Use fresh fruits instead of canned or processed alternatives
  • Fill a sandwich bag with something other than a sandwich. There are many other food options for your kids to snack on, such as carrots, nuts, granola, or raisins.
  • Initiate a salad day. Prepare the basics the night before and have your child choose some toppings including sliced chicken or turkey or low-fat cheese.
  • Introduce wraps as an option to a boring old sandwich. Give it extra flavor by coating with a low-fat spread and fill it with lettuce and protein.  You can cut the wrap into pinwheel slices for fun.
  • Invest in a thermos and fill it up with mac and cheese or your child’s favorite soup, stew or pasta.
  • Encourage your child to drink plenty of water instead of sugary juice boxes or soda. Sugary drinks are considered one of the leading causes of childhood obesity.

Whether your child buys or packs lunch, it’s important to stay involved. Talk to them about what food choices they made and discuss the many benefits eating a healthy diet has on both their mind and body.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

What is Bell’s Palsy ?

Bell’s palsy is a condition that causes the muscles on one side of the face to become very weak or even paralyzed. When this happens, the face droops on one side. The cause of this is usually damage to the seventh cranial nerve, known as the “facial nerve” . It is more common in people who have diabetes, are pregnant or who have recently had a viral infection, but it can happen to anyone. Bell’s palsy is usually only temporary with the symptoms disappearing within a few weeks to a few months.
Symptoms of Bell’s Palsy:
• Unable to blink on one side
• Facial droop
• Drooling
• Problem with chewing
• Loss of sense of taste
• Unable to close one eye
• Possible pain behind the ear or in the jaw
Diagnosing Bell’s palsy usually involves taking a detailed medical history as well as ruling out other causes of nerve damage to the face. These symptoms can also be caused by a stroke, Lyme disease and a stroke.  A physician may order a few tests to help with the diagnosis. This might include an MRI, a CT scan and an Electromyography (EMG).
Bell’s palsy often will start to resolve on its own after a few weeks. To relieve some of the symptoms, which can be very uncomfortable, a physician might prescribe corticosteroids which have an anti-inflammatory affect and also some physical therapy.  To relieve some pain, a mild pain reliever can be taken such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or Tylenol.
If you have any symptoms of sudden facial drooping you should go to the nearest emergency room immediately. .

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

#WellnessWednesday

There is no time like the present to make healthy changes in your life. A healthy lifestyle would include eating a balanced diet, exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy weight.

According to the Mayo Clinic, there are 12 habits that are practiced by people who are living a healthy lifestyle.

They include:

  1. Physical activity
  2. Forgiveness
  3. Portion size
  4. Preventive healthcare screening
  5. Adequate sleep
  6. Trying something new
  7. Strength and flexibility
  8. Laughter
  9. Family and friends
  10. Addressing addictive behaviors
  11. Quieting your mind
  12. Gratitude

Every day, take a few minutes to make a small change that will have a positive effect on your body.  It’s never too late to start taking care of your body.  After all, it’s the only one you’ve got.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.