November is COPD Awareness Month – Know Your COPD Facts

November is National COPD Awareness Month. This observance is an opportunity for everyone across the country to increase their overall awareness of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

ThinkstockPhotos-522695539COPD is a form of lung disease that makes breathing difficult. It is caused by damage to the lungs over a prolonged period of time and is usually attributed to smoking. COPD can result in serious, long term disability and is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It kills more than 120,000 Americans each year – that’s one death every four seconds and that number is increasing every year.

The most common symptoms of COPD include shortness of breath, chronic cough, and difficulty performing simple daily tasks, such as climbing stairs.

Those most at risk of developing COPD are individuals who:
• Are over age 40 and currently smoke or smoked at some point
• Worked or lived around chemicals or fumes
• Have certain genetic conditions

If you think you have COPD, you should:
• Talk with your healthcare provider about your symptoms
• Request a breathing test, known as a spirometry
• Quit smoking! If you need help, ask your doctor
• Avoid pollutants or fumes that can irritate your lungs

While you can’t undo the damage COPD has caused to your lungs, there are steps you can take to prevent the condition from getting worse, such as:
• Taking medications as directed by your doctor
• Enrolling in a pulmonary rehabilitation program
• Avoiding factors that can irritate your lungs
• Receiving annual flu and pneumonia vaccines

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

History of Invitro Fertilization

Ovum Cold Color (in vitro fertilization)

On July 25, 1978 the first baby was born that had been conceived invitro.  These babies were referred to as “Test Tube Babies” because they were essentially created in a laboratory in a glass tube. Invitro Fertilization is the process where the egg harvested from a female is combined with the sperm obtained from a male in a lab and in a glass tube. This was the culmination of many years of research performed by Dr. Patrick Steptoe and Dr. Robert Edwards during the 1960’s and 1970’s in England.
The invention of the microscope in the 17th century really helped scientists understand how fertilization takes place. For hundreds of years following this development, research was done on how to implant fertilize eggs artificially, but while still within the body.  It wasn’t until the beginning of the 20th century that fertilization outside of the body was begun. In 1959 the first rabbit to be conceived invitro was born, followed in 1963 by a hamster and in 1972 by the birth of a mouse.  The technique that really helped advance IVF was the use of laparascopic surgery. This allows the gynecologist to remove the follicles from the ovary very precisely.
It is estimated that now over 200,000 babies have been conceived using IVF. The procedure has been improved upon tremendously in the last few years.  Many times this process leads to multiple eggs being fertilized and more than one baby being conceived.
To speak to a physician at Jamaica Hospital about IVF and pregnancy in general please schedule an appointment at our Women’s Health Center at 718-291-3276.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Pain Management

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Pain is described as a distressful, uncomfortable feeling that tells your body something is wrong. It is physical suffering that is the result of an injury or illness.  While we have all experienced sensations that we may describe as shooting pains, sharp pains, passing or steady pains; pain and pain tolerance is unique to each individual.  Pain can be temporary and a nuisance for some, it can also be long term and debilitating for others.

When pain becomes long term and interferes with normal, daily physical activities, it is recommended that you seek the help of a physician for pain management.  Pain management specialists use an interdisciplinary approach to diagnose the source of your pain and offer treatment options to bring you relief.  They will assess your symptoms to determine the type of pain you may be experiencing.

Pain can be categorized into two main categories: acute pain or chronic pain.  Acute pain occurs for a short duration of time. It typically lasts less than three to six months.  Chronic pain lasts longer and signals that there is an ongoing cause for your pain.

Treating chronic pain can be challenging and your doctor may need to explore several methods of treatment. Treatment options that your pain management specialist may apply include:

  • Medications
  • Surgery
  • Acupuncture
  • Psychotherapy
  • Chiropractic therapy

The TJH Interventional Pain Management Practice, conveniently located on the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center campus offers an interdisciplinary approach to pain management while providing comprehensive evaluations and treatment options to patients with chronic pain in relaxing and private setting.

The goal of the practice is to provide comfort and improve the quality of life patients by reducing or eliminating their pain. Patients who receive pain management services generally are able to return to their normal lifestyle, quicker and without the use of addictive medications. To schedule an appointment with a pain management specialist, please call 718-206-PAIN.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Taking Medication While Breastfeeding

breastfeeding -484679202Breastfeeding mothers are often cautioned to be mindful of the things they eat or drink because whatever they ingest will make its way into their breast milk.  The same advice is given for taking medication while breastfeeding.

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, most medications are transferred in low doses in breast milk and are safe to take. However, it is always recommended that your physician is consulted before doing so because there are exceptions.  Some medicines can remain concentrated in breast milk.

Another reason to speak with your doctor is he or she can advise if your baby runs the risk of being affected by medications due to age or health condition.  Babies who are premature, newborn or diagnosed with certain chronic health conditions run a high risk of having adverse reactions.

If the medicine you are taking is determined to be unsafe while breastfeeding, your physician may recommend that you stop nursing temporarily or permanently.

It is always good to know if substances you ingest may harm your nursing baby. Always remember to speak with your doctor before taking any medications, dietary supplements or herbal remedies.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

The month of November has been designated American Diabetes Awareness Month by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Diabetes affects nearly 30 million people in the United States which is ten percent of the total population. There are 86 million more people who have pre-diabetes and are at risk of developing type II diabetes during their lifetime.

There is no cure for diabetes but there are many ways for people who have been diagnosed with the disease to live long, healthy lives if it is controlled properly. Learning to live with diabetes is one of the most important components for managing the disease. Proper nutrition, regular physical activity, monitoring blood sugar daily and taking medication to control diabetes are some of the ways that complications can be prevented. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to many complications. It is the leading cause of blindness, non traumatic amputations, kidney disease and also increases the risk for heart attacks.

During the month of November the ADA sponsors events around the country that serve to make people aware of the risk factors and the warning signs of diabetes. For more information on events taking place, please see the American Diabetes Association’s website at www.diabetes.orgDiabetes Awareness. It is important to have regular medical exams to manage diabetes successfully. To schedule an appointment with a physician at Jamaica Hospital please call 718-206-6742.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Ways to Control Asthma During a Cold

cold -467436807Colds make us feel miserable and coughing fits tend to bring attention to us at times when we want it least. For most catching a cold is a nuisance but for others with chronic respiratory conditions such as asthma, colds can be very serious.  Colds are one of the most common causes for flare ups in asthmatics.  The mildest of cold symptoms can easily lead to wheezing, shortness of breath or trigger asthma attacks.

Taking preventative measures to avoid catching a cold is one of the best recommendations that asthmatics can follow. Some of these precautions include: frequently washing or sanitizing hands, staying away from individuals who have colds and avoiding contact to the eyes and nose.

Even though prevention is highly recommended, during the cold season avoiding a cold is sometimes easier said than done. If you do contract the cold virus there are several things you can do to help control your asthma:

  1. If you are sick stay home and take care of yourself. Staying home can help you avoid environmental factors that could worsen your condition.
  2. Monitor your air flow by frequently using a peak flow meter. If there is a drop in peak flow rates contact your physician to discuss adjustments to medication.
  3. Keep track of changes in your condition and developing asthma symptoms such as wheezing, tightness of the chest or coughing.
  4. Take medication as advised by your doctor.

Following these recommendations can help you manage symptoms and reduce the risk of a serious attack.  If your condition continues to get worse after several days, make an appointment to see your doctor as soon as possible.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Baby’s First Year

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If you are a new mom or dad, you may wonder what to expect and how to know if your baby’s development is on target.

In the first 12 months, your baby will undergo an incredible transformation with every month bringing new and exciting developmental strides.

There is a wide “window” for when it is normal for a baby to reach a particular developmental stage. If your baby reaches one milestone sooner and another later, he or she may be focused on perfecting another skill.

Keeping in mind that babies will progress at their own pace, here’s a list of what your baby may be doing during each three-month stage of the first year:

Zero to Three months

  • Early on, it will be just to him/her, but within three months, baby will be smiling in response to your smiles and trying to get you to smile back
  • Raising head and chest when placed on the tummy
  • Track objects with eyes and gradually decrease eye crossing
  • Open and shut hands and bring hands to mouth
  • Grip objects in hands
  • Take swipes at or reach for dangling objects

Four to Six Months

  • Roll over from front to back or back to front. Front to back usually comes first
  • Babble, making sounds that can sound like real language
  • Laugh
  • Reach out for and grab objects
  • Manipulate toys with their hands
  • Sit up with support and have great head control

Seven to Nine Months

  • Start to crawl
  • Sit without support
  • Respond to familiar words such as name
  • Babble becomes “Mama” and “Dada”
  • Clap and play games such as peekaboo
  • Learn to pull up to a standing position

Ten to 12 Months

  • Self-feeding and holding small objects such as O-shaped cereal between thumb and forefinger
  • Cruising or moving around the room
  • “Mama and “Dada” become more specific as a name for parents. The average is about three spoken words by the first birthday
  • Take first steps

If you are concerned that your baby may not be marking the strides expected each month after birth and would like to speak with a pediatrician,  call Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory Care Center for an appointment at 718-206-7001.

 

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.