What to Expect When You Are Expecting

pregnant-469910566

 

There are so many changes your body goes through when you are pregnant, but there are also some screenings you may need to undergo to determine your health and the health of your unborn child; especially in your first and third trimesters.

  • First trimester testing may include blood and urine samples to determine
  • The level of the hCG hormone
  • Check for a kidney infection
  • Blood glucose for diabetes
  • Blood typing
  • Rh factor

Additionally, your blood could be tested for anemia, rubella (German measles), hepatitis B, HIV and sexually transmitted diseases.

As your pregnancy progresses, your obstetrician may order tests for diseases such as toxoplasmosis (toxoplasma gondii parasite, one of the world’s most common parasites) and varicella (the virus that causes chickenpox).

If you are like most pregnant women, the only tests you’ll need in your third trimester are routine screenings. They are a combination of additional blood and urine tests, blood pressure check, measurement of your uterus and a check of your baby’s heartbeat and an ultrasound to mark the baby’s due date and fetal development.

You may be tested for group B streptococcus, a bacterium that you can pass to your child during delivery. If you test positive, you will need to receive antibiotics during labor to prevent your baby from becoming ill.

Depending on your racial, ethnic or family background, genetic testing may be required, as well as a:

  • Nonstress Test – Woman who are carrying multiples or have chronic conditions such as high blood pressure or diabetes.
  • Aminiocentesis – This test is commonly done in the second trimester to diagnose or rule out fetal birth defects, and is generally recommended to women wo are age 35 and older.

It sounds like a great deal of testing, but the majority of the tests are minimally invasive and necessary since these conditions can affect the baby’s health and well-being.

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

National School Backpack Awareness Day – Backpack Safety

Back safety-513203503Backpacks are essential back-to- school items for kids.  They come in different colors, sizes and shapes and most importantly they help children to carry their belongings.  Backpacks are preferred by many in comparison to shoulder bags because when worn correctly, they evenly distribute weight across the body.  However, if worn incorrectly they can cause back pain or injuries and eventually lead to poor posture.

To prevent problems associated with improper backpack use, parents should first purchase a backpack that has the following features:

  • Lightweight
  • Wide and padded straps
  • Multiple compartments
  • Padded back
  • Waist belt
  • Correct size (A backpack should never be wider or longer than your child’s torso).

Practicing these safety tips will further reduce the chance of back pain or injuries caused by backpacks:

  • When packing, heavier items should be placed to the back and center of the backpack. Lighter items should be in front. Sharp objects such as scissors or pencils should be kept away from your child’s back.  Utilizing different compartments can help in distributing weight.
  • Do not over pack. Doctors recommend that children should not carry backpacks that weigh more than 10-15% of their body weight.
  • Ensure that children use both straps. Using a single strap can cause muscle strain.
  • Adjust the straps so that the backpack fits closely to your child’s back and sits two inches above the waist. This ensures comfort and proper weight distribution.
  • Encourage children to use their lockers or desks throughout the day to drop off heavy books.

The Pediatric Orthopedic Society of North America recommends that parents should always look for warning signs that indicate backpacks may be too heavy. If your child struggles to put on and take off the backpack, they are complaining of numbness or tingling or if there are red strap marks on their shoulders -It may be time for you to lighten their load.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Apple Picking Season is here! Try a healthier spin on Grandma’s Apple Pie

The fall brings cool crisp days, making it an ideal time to make use of all the delicious apples picked straight from the orchard. Pies are delicious but can be packed with sugar. Try this recipe from Eating Well for a healthier version of a deep dish apple pie. This recipe may require some extra time, but well worth the wait when making with a bit of TLC.

Enjoy the harvest!

DS6215

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September 13th – National Celiac Disease Awareness Day

ThinkstockPhotos-538179807Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that damages the small intestine, preventing the absorption of nutrients from food. It is triggered by the consumption of a protein called gluten, which can be found in wheat, barley, and rye. Approximately one percent of the population suffers from celiac disease and it affects men and women across all ages and races.

Symptoms vary depending on the age of onset, but in general, celiac disease, or gluten intolerance as it is also known, generally results in: abdominal pain, bloating, diarrhea, vomiting, poor appetite, lethargy, irritability and depression.

Children with celiac disease fail to gain weight and have a late onset of puberty. Adults with the disease also can develop anemia, joint and bone pain, arthritis, itchy rash, and mouth sores.

Accurately diagnosing celiac disease is difficult because the symptoms are similar to other diseases, but if left untreated, it can lead to serious health risks including infertility, neurological disorders, some cancers, and other auto-immune diseases.

Currently, there is no medication to cure celiac disease. The only way to treat the disease is through a strict, life-long gluten free diet, which means avoiding all foods that contain wheat, rye, and barley. Despite these restrictions, many people with celiac disease can still enjoy a well-balanced diet, with a variety of foods including bread and pasta. Due to increased awareness of celiac disease, there are many gluten-free alternatives now available; in fact sales of gluten-free products are expected to exceed $5 billion in 2015.

September 13th is National Celiac Disease Awareness Day. If you think you or a loved one has celiac disease, make an appointment with your doctor. A series of blood tests can help determine if you have it. If you are diagnosed with celiac disease, together, you, your doctor, and your family can map out a plan to help you live a healthy, gluten-free lifestyle.

If you do not have a doctor, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Family Medicine Center to schedule an appointment at 718-657-7093.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

Ovarian Cancer is one of the most serious cancers affecting women. In the United States an estimated 22,000 annually women will be diagnosed with this disease and approximately      14,250 will die as a result of it. This type of cancer typically affects women who are in their fifties and sixties, and frequently have a family history of the disease. When the disease is detected early, the five year survival rate is above 93%.
Symptoms of ovarian cancer are:
• Bloating
• Nausea, indigestion, gas, and constipation
• Abdominal and pelvic pain
• Fatigue
• Backaches
• Urinary frequency and urgency
When a physician suspects ovarian cancer, they will perform certain tests to confirm the diagnosis. The exam will include a blood test for the CA-125 marker, examination of the abdomen to see if there is tenderness, a pelvic exam, ultrasound, and a biopsy.
There are four main stages of ovarian cancer.
Stage I – completely confined to one or both ovaries
Stage II – Found in one or both ovaries with spread to other pelvic organs (bladder, colon,                             rectum, uterus)
Stage III – Cancer is found in one or both ovaries and has spread to the lining of the abdomen and/or the lymph nodes
Stage IV – Most advanced stage of the disease with spread to additional organs such as liver and lung
The three main types of ovarian cancer are: epithelial cell tumors (most common), Germ cell tumors and Stromal cell tumors.  When these tumors are benign they never spread beyond the ovary. When they are malignant these tumors can spread to parts of the body beyond the pelvis and be fatal.
Treatment options for ovarian cancer include chemotherapy, surgical removal of the affected organ(s), hormone therapy, and radiation. The type of treatment will be determined by the type of ovarian cancer, the age of the patient, and the stage of the disease.
Early detection is important and women should have an annual gynecological exam once a year. If you would like to make an appointment at Jamaica Hospital’s Women’s Health Center, please call 718-291-3276.Ovarian Cancer

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Suicide Prevention- Pay Attention to The Signs

Suicide prevention-467918329An estimated 1 million Americans attempt suicide each year. It is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. Ninety percent of people who committed suicide had treatable mental health disorders that went unnoticed.   Suicides can be prevented if signs associated with the mental health disorder are recognized and addressed immediately.

There are several signs that may indicate that a person is suffering from a mental health issue and is contemplating suicide. If someone you know exhibits the following behaviors, do not dismiss them as a passing phase:

  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Self-loathing
  • Changes in sleep patterns; which can either be excessive sleep or a deprivation of sleep
  • Irritability or anger
  • Talking about harming themselves
  • Loss of interest in daily activities or things they were once passionate about
  • Reckless behavior
  • Increasing use of alcohol or drugs
  • A preoccupation with death
  • Getting their affairs in order in preparation for death
  • Verbalizing thoughts such as “ Everyone will be better without me”  or “I  have nothing  to live for”
  • Visiting or calling people to say goodbye

These actions are a cry for help. It is important to let your loved one know that you have recognized changes in their behavior, they are not alone and you are there to support them through this difficult time.  Speak openly about what they are feeling and ensure them they will not be judged because they feel suicidal.  Seek the help of a mental health professional immediately.  Insist on accompanying this person to their consultation or treatment. Continue to demonstrate your support during treatment by reminding them to take prescribed medications, keeping up with physician appointments and encouraging a positive lifestyle.

If you or someone you know is having suicidal thoughts or demonstrating suicidal behaviors, get help immediately. Call 911, 1-800-SUICIDE, or 1-800-273-TALK

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Stay focused while driving- Especially in School Zones

ThinkstockPhotos-177598403We often ourselves in a rush to get to work or to an event while fighting through traffic due to our fast paced lives.  According to the National Safety Council, speeding is one of the top three reasons for fatalities on the road.  Approximately 13,000 lives lost each year due to speeding and driving distractions.  As the school year begins, Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma team urges you to slow down and abide by the speed limit, especially in designated school zones.

In a research conducted by Safekids.org, it was noted that it would take a distracted driver twice as long to reach a complete stop compared to an attentive driver under the same driving conditions.  It could be a matter of life or death. Abiding by the school zone speed limit is crucial to any child’s safety. The purpose of a school speed zone is to reduce the speeds of traffic so that:

  • A driver has more time to recognize and react to a schoolchild within the travel way, allowing enough distance to slow, avoid and/or stop prior to an incident.
  • School children, especially young school children, can anticipate car movements to safely cross the street.
  • A vehicle-pedestrian crash will be much less severe at a reduced speed as evidenced by the following statistics according to the National Highway & Traffic Association (NHTA):

Vehicle Speed Chance of Fatality

40 MPH 80%

30 MPH 40%

25 MPH 20%

20 MPH 5%

 Here are some additional ways to avoid a motor vehicle accident as back-to-school traffic approaches:

  • Be patient when a school bus comes to a full stop- this will require you as the driver to stop as well.
  • To avoid any anticipated driving stress, be sure to plan your route the day prior and leave with a sufficient amount of time to anticipate any traffic delays or road closures.
  • Avoid being distracted and place the cell phone away or ensure you receive calls with your hands-free technology.
  • Be sure to abide by your local speed limits

Being a cautious driver is being the best driver you can be and your community will thank you for it.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Many Benefits of Garlic

Looking for a wonder drug that can:

ThinkstockPhotos-469904627• Lower your blood pressure and cholesterol? Check
• Boost your immune system? Check
• Control you diabetes? Check
• Improve your digestive and respiratory system? Check

What is this new, breakthrough drug? It’s not a medication at all; in fact you can find it at your local grocery store. It’s garlic!

Garlic is a plant that is used in many cultures for both culinary and medical purposes for hundreds of years. Eaten on its own, or more commonly used as an ingredient in many tasty dishes, garlic contains allicin, which is known to have anti-oxidant, anti-viral, and anti-bacterial properties.

Garlic has been shown to lower blood pressure by relaxing vein and artery walls. This action helps keep platelets from clumping together and improves blood flow, thereby reducing the risk of stroke. Garlic also decreases the levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, substances that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Studies suggest that regularly eating garlic helps lower blood pressure and controls blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

This popular herb may also improve immunity by stimulating some of the body’s natural immune cells. Studies suggest that garlic may help prevent breast, bladder, skin, stomach, and colon cancer. Garlic’s antibacterial properties also make it a wonderful anti-viral and decongestant to prevent and combat colds, coughs, and upper respiratory tract infections. In addition, Garlic is often used to treat many other common maladies such as ear infections, toothaches, and treatment for warts and athlete’s foot.

Garlic can be digested either cooked or in raw form (but only in small amounts). If you do not like the taste of garlic there are also powdered or caplet forms. Your doctor can recommend which form of garlic is best for you.

For most people, consuming garlic does not cause any serious side effects if taken in moderation, but it can cause heartburn or stomach irritation if taken in excess. Due to its blood thinning properties, individuals taking anti-coagulant medications should speak with their doctor before increasing their daily garlic intake.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Rare but True – Can You be Allergic to the Cold ?

Every winter people complain that they need to be in a warm climate because they are “allergic” to the cold. While we think most are just trying to dramatize the effects of the cold weather in reality, there are some people who actually are allergic to the cold. The condition known as “Cold Urticaria” is brought on by exposure to the cold. It is caused by the body’s release of histamine i to the blood stream. the same chemical that gets released during an allergic reaction. This condition may be either an inherited trait or due to a virus.
Some of the signs and symptoms are:
• Reddish hives on skin that was exposed to the cold
• Hands that swell when they come in contact with cold objects
• Swelling of the lips, tongue  and throat when touched by cold liquids
• Heart palpitations or fainting might occur in extreme cases.
• Headaches, fever and joint pain.
The effects of this allergic occurs when the temperature drops below 39 degrees but can also present  at higher temperatures. The condition is usually limited to the part of the body that has been exposed but can have a full body effect if a person goes swimming in cold water or if they aren’t properly dressed in cold weather. One of the ways that it is diagnosed is by placing an ice cube on the skin for five minutes to see if there are any signs of a rash.
Treatment options include taking antihistamines, which will help ease the symptoms, avoiding extreme cold and making sure that you don’t leave areas of the body exposed in cold weather .
People who have cold urticaria should see a dermatologist to obtain prescription medications which may help to ease the symptoms. To schedule an appointment with a dermatologist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, please call 718-206-7001.Goose Bumps

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Your Body Makes Milk for Your Baby

breastfeeding-475378452Your breasts give you the earliest clues that you are pregnant.  When you become pregnant, they become swollen, tender and the skin on your nipples and areolas become darker. Within the first trimester you will continue to experience physical changes in your breasts-such as the bumps(Montgomery glands) surrounding your areolas  increasing in size. Milk –producing cells (alveoli) and ducts in the mammary glands will also multiply in preparation for the distribution of milk.

Usually by your fourth to sixth month of pregnancy, hormones will be released which tell your mammary glands to begin producing milk.  The alveoli draw fats, proteins and sugars from your blood to make breast milk. At this point of pregnancy, it is not unusual for your body to begin leaking milk. This form of milk is called colostrum and may be yellow or orange in color and sticky.

After the birth of your baby the body increases levels of the hormone prolactin.  This hormone releases signals to produce more milk. It is also known as the hormone that makes mothers feel maternal.

You can attempt to feed your baby soon after delivering; however some mothers are not fully capable of feeding their newborn within 24 to 48 hours after delivery. Your “first milk” will be colostrum, which will have a creamy appearance.  Colostrum is specially created for newborns; it is high in protein, low in fat and sugar and is easy to digest. It also helps your baby to make the first bowel movement and provides antibodies that strengthen the immune system.

As you can see, your body is designed to make the nutrients most essential to your baby’s health.  Breastfeeding will provide many benefits for your bundle of joy and it will also provide you with countless health, emotional and financial benefits.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.