Colorectal Surgery

ColonA colorectal surgeon performs procedures on the intestinal tract, anus, rectum and peri-anal area of the body. One of the commonly treated conditions that they treat are hemorrhoids.
A hemorrhoid is a condition that occurs when veins in the anus and lower rectum become inflamed.  They can be either internal (inside the lower rectum) or external (under the skin in the peri-anal area). They can be the result of repeated straining during a bowel movement and can also occur during pregnancy. Hemorrhoids are common, and by the age of fifty approximately half of the adults have experienced them to some extent. This is due to the aging process of the tissues that support the veins in the peri-anal area.
• Symptoms of hemorrhoids include
• Discomfort in the anal area
• Swelling in the anal area
• Bright red bleeding during a bowel movement
• Bumps around the opening of the anus
Depending on the severity of the hemorrhoid, different treatment options exist. In mild cases, hemorrhoids may be able to be treated with creams or ointments. Changing the diet to include more fiber and adding a stool softener may also help.  In more severe cases surgery may be necessary.  A hemorrhoidectomy is the surgical correction of this condition.
The surgery department at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offers colorectal diagnostic imaging and board certified surgeons who can treat all forms of colorectal disorders. In addition to hemorrhoids, some of the other conditions that they can treat are polyps, rectal prolapse, colon cancer, fissures, and abscesses. To schedule an appointment please call 718-206-7110.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Why Do We Get Grey Hair?

Some think having grey hair makes them appear distinguished or intelligent; others just think it makes them look old. Either way, grey hair is a natural sign of aging for all of us, but why does our hair turn grey and why does it happen to some people earlier in life than others?

ThinkstockPhotos-78814148Each strand of hair on our head is surrounded by a tube of tissue called a follicle. These follicles contain pigment cells that produce the chemical, melanin, which gives our hair its color. As we get older, the pigment cells in our hair follicles gradually die. When there are fewer pigment cells in a hair follicle, that strand of hair will no longer contain as much melanin and the hair will become a more transparent color — like grey, silver, or white as it grows.

People can get grey hair at any age. How early we get grey hair is determined by heredity. When you’re born, your genes are already hardwired for when and how quickly your hair will turn grey. This means that most of us will start developing grey hairs when our parents or grandparents did. This also applies to those who turn grey prematurely—people who grey before age 30 usually do so because it runs in their family.

While some researchers say that your genes are solely responsible for grey hair, others say that there seems to be a connection between greying and stress. While this may be true, the belief that a single traumatic or shocking event will cause your hair to suddenly turn grey is not true. Hair, once grown, doesn’t change color, so waking up with a head of white hair isn’t going to happen.

Another myth is that if you pluck one grey hair, it will cause three new ones to grow in its place. This old wives’ tale is simply not true. Each follicle can contain only one hair, and plucking it won’t make it able to produce multiple hairs. What happens to one follicle has no bearing on others.

So whether you plan to embrace your grey hair or cover it with any number of dyes and other concealing products, just know that there is no avoiding it – if and when you turn grey has already been decided.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

ADHD

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most common mental disorder diagnosed in children, as well as found in teens and continue into adulthood. Children who are diagnosed with ADHD tend to be hyperactive, have difficulty staying focused, and can’t control their impulses.  Boys tend to be affected more frequently than girls. There isn’t a definite cause for the illness but there is a hereditary component, or result of a chemical imbalance in people who are diagnosed with ADHD. Mothers who smoke, drank alcohol, had poor nutrition, or were substance abusers during their pregnancy tend to have children with a higher incidence of the disease.
Children with ADHD:
• Are easily distracted
• Have trouble sitting still
• Have trouble waiting their turn
• Have difficulty organizing themselves
• Talk excessively
ADHD cannot be cured but can be managed through therapy and medication. Dr. Teresita Ruiz a psychiatrist at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, recommends that a parent who suspects their child is showing signs of abnormal behavior, seek professional help for an evaluation. Early intervention is an important component of successfully managing ADHD. To schedule an appointment with a child psychiatrist at Jamaica Hospital, please call 718-206-7160.ADHD

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

A Parent’s Guide to Chicken Pox

chickenpox 456101483Chicken pox is a common childhood infection that is highly contagious and caused by the varicella- zoster virus, the same virus that causes shingles.  The virus can spread by contact with skin and clothing or by the exchange of bodily fluids which can be transferred by sneezing and coughing.

Chicken pox is characterized by itchy red bumps which can eventually develop into blisters.   Additional symptoms associated with chicken pox are fever, sore throat, loss of appetite and body aches.

If left untreated chicken pox may lead to other complications such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, inflammation of the brain or toxic shock syndrome.

The first step parents should take in treating a child with chicken pox is bringing them to see their pediatrician to confirm that they have the virus.  If diagnosed with chicken pox, there are several methods of treatment the physician may choose. Your pediatrician may prescribe antiviral medications and will advise you to keep your child at home and away from others who are at risk for contracting the virus.

While at home, there are several remedies and practices that you can use to bring relief to your child. Some of which include:

  • Ensuring proper hydration.
  • Adding oatmeal or baking soda to baths.
  • Applying calamine lotion to relieve itching.
  • Gargling salt mixed in warm water to bring relief to mouth sores.
  • Trimming fingernails or covering hands to prevent scratching. Scratching can lead to an infection.

The best way to prevent chicken pox is to get your child vaccinated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that children should receive two doses of the vaccine. The first dose is usually given around 12-15 months of age and the second at around 18 months.  If you believe your child has chicken pox and would like to make an appointment with a pediatrician please call Jamaica Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at 718 206 7050.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Honey Hastens Healing

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Did you know that out of all areas in the home, the kitchen is number one for getting burns and did you, also, know that the kitchen is a place you can find home remedies for that burn?

While most minor burns will heal on their own, there are home treatment remedies that can relieve your symptoms and promote healing, such as:

  • Honey – Honey has long been a remedy to disinfect wounds and heal burns. When applied to a burn, honey draws out fluids from the tissues, effectively cleaning the wound. You may also apply the honey to a gauze bandage, which is less sticky than direct application. On a piece of sterile gauze, place a dollop of honey and put the bandage directly on the burn, honey-side down. The dressing should be changed three to four times per day.
  • Additional home remedies for burns that can be found in your kitchen are:
  • Oatmeal – Oatmeal baths can help relieve the itch while the burn is healing
  • Tea bags – Tea bags contain tannic acid and help draw the heat from a burn. Gently dab the liquid, from a luke-warm water moistened tea bag, on the burn site.
  • Vinegar – Vinegar works as an astringent and antiseptic on minor burns and helps prevent infection. Dilute the vinegar with equal parts water, and rinse the burned area with the solution.
  • Cool water. – While ice is nice for sore muscles, cool water is the best liquid refreshment for burned skin. Ice can restrict blood flow to the burn site and further damage delicate tissues. Instead, gently run cool water or place cool compresses over the burn site for ten minutes. Do this as quickly as possible, preferably within seconds of getting a burn. Cool water not only feels good but will help stop the burn from spreading, and the sooner you run cool water on the burn, the greater the effect will be to reduce it.

Do’s and Don’ts to avoid burns:

  • DO lower the temperature of your hot-water heater to below 120 degrees F. A second-degree burn can happen within seconds in water that’s hotter than 120 degrees.
  • DO turn pot handles toward the back of the stove.
  • DO keep that steaming cup of java out of a child’s reach, which means off the coffee table or other low-lying areas.
  • DON’T ever leave a child unattended in the kitchen.
  • DO make the stove area off-limits to children.
  • DO put a childproof lock on the oven door.
  • DO keep oven mitts and potholders handy when cooking.

You can try these remedies for minor burns, but if you suspect you may have a more severe injury, please seek medical treatment immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Follow Proper Roadside Safety This Summer

As summer approaches, most Americans are beginning to plan vacation “road trips” to the beach, amusement parks, and other destinations. With more families on the road, the chances of roadside accidents increase as well. Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Center wants to take this opportunity to advise motorists on what to do (and what not to do) if your car breaks down on the road.

ThinkstockPhotos-451193173Whether it’s a flat tire, dead battery, engine failure, or a fender bender, every year millions of Americans encounter some form of vehicle trouble. If you find yourself in one of these situations, responding appropriately and taking proper precautions can mean the difference between life and death. According to the Federal Highway Administration, 59,000 pedestrians are injured during roadway crashes every year, with roughly 4,000 people killed, accounting for 12% of traffic accidents.

Follow these tips to ensure proper roadside safety to avoid making a bad situation even worse:

• Know your location. Look for street signs, restaurants, mile markers, or other surrounding identifiers so when you call for help, it will arrive with minimal delay.

• If you get stuck, make sure your vehicle is as visible as possible. Put your hazard lights on immediately. If you have them in your trunk, use flares, reflective lights or brightly colored flags as well. Another trick to bring attention to your car is to lift the hood.

• If you are able to, get your car out of the line of traffic. Moving your car onto highway shoulders, medians, and exit ramps are all safer options than leaving it in the middle of the road. Never try to repair or assess damage to your car on a busy highway.

• Once you are away from traffic, the safest choice is to remain in your vehicle with your seatbelt fastened. This is a much better option than waiting outside your car for assistance. If you must get out of your car, make sure to get out on the side furthest from the flow of traffic.

• If you cannot get off the road, do not stay in your vehicle. Exit your car or truck with extreme caution and get to a safe, out-of-the-way location and wait for help to arrive.

Jamaica Hospital’s Trauma Department wants you to remember that if you encounter a roadside emergency, your well-being and that of your family should be your number one priority. Following proper roadside safety precautions and using good judgment will have a direct bearing on your personal safety.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

How Much Sweat is Normal ?

The amount of sweat that a person produces varies from person to person and is dependent on the activity a person is doing. A person that works in a climate controlled environment is going to sweat less than a person working out in a gym or doing manual labor. Excess sweating is called hyperhidrosis and this occurs when a person is sweating more than what might be considered normal. There is no quantifiable number that can be associated with excess sweating but a person who sweats through their clothes in an environment where it isn’t routine for heavy sweating, should be evaluated. Certain people sweat excessively due to the medications they are taking, sometimes there may be an infection that the body is trying to fight, and some people have a family history of excessive sweating.
A simple way to treat perspiration is by using an over the counter anti-perspirant. In more severe cases a physician may prescribe medication that will help to control excess sweating and in very severe cases there are procedures that can be performed that will help control the perspiration.
If you think that you may be sweating excessively, contact your physician and have a thorough exam performed. You can schedule an appointment with a doctor at Jamaica Hospital by calling 718-206-7001.Sweat

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

6 Top Conditions that Threaten Men’s Health

Mens Health-83405698There is the ongoing joke that getting most men to see a doctor for regular checkups may take as much persuasion as getting them to ask for directions.  A national survey has shown that women are three times more likely to see a physician for checkups than men and men are more likely to see a doctor only when they experience alarming symptoms of illness.

Despite the reluctance to go for checkups, it is important for men to see their doctors because as they get older, the risks for developing life-threatening health conditions can increase. Many of these conditions are preventative or can be controlled if they are detected early.  Some of the leading conditions that threaten men’s health include:

  1. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)-The risk of hypertension increases with men who are 45 years old and older; however, it is not uncommon for younger men to be diagnosed with this condition. Your level of alcohol consumption can also affect your chances of developing high blood pressure. Men who consume alcohol heavily are at a higher risk for hypertension than non-drinkers.
  2. Cancer- According the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the leading causes of cancer deaths among men is prostate cancer, lung cancer and colorectal cancer.
  3. High cholesterol –Men over the age of twenty years old are at risk for high cholesterol. High cholesterol can lead to other health conditions such as heart disease. A study found that men with high levels of cholesterol had more than three times more likely to have heart attacks than women.
  4. Stroke- Studies have indicated that men who are African American, seniors or smokers are at higher risk for developing strokes.
  5. Diabetes- The number of men affected by Type 2 diabetes has increased significantly. The risk of this disease tends to increase with age. It is recommended that men are screened regularly after the age of 45.
  6. Cardiovascular disease- The American Heart Association has estimated that one in three adult men have some form of cardiovascular disease.

Men-waiting for the onset of debilitating health symptoms is not the best way to gauge your health. There are serious health conditions that can often go undetected until they are at an advanced stage.  Going for regular checkups may give your physician a better chance of detecting symptoms that indicate serious health issues.  It is important to keep in mind that many health conditions are preventative or treatable with early detection.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

Feeling Parched?

Anyone can experience xeThinkstockPhotos-139971388rostomia, also known as dry mouth. It affects the function of the salivary glands and can happen to anyone occasionally due to stress or being nervous. It is also experienced by many for other reasons such as hormonal changes or as a side effect to certain medications.

Some of the symptoms of dry mouth include a parched feeling in the mouth, thick or stringy saliva, a rough tongue, excessive thirst, mouth sores, bad breath, loss of taste, cracked lips and difficulty chewing, speaking or swallowing. Dry mouth can make chewing food difficult and can possibly lead to tooth decay if not treated.

If you experience dry mouth, here are some helpful home remedies to help find relief from this uncomfortable condition.

  • Increase your fluid intake. Aside from water, look for different ways to sneak in some H2O in your fruits and vegetable such as cucumber, watermelons and pineapple to get the salivary glands activated and working.
  • Try some ginger or fennel seeds as a salivary stimulant. The flavonoids in fennel seeds stimulate the flow of saliva and their aromatic flavor helps combat bad breath that accompanies dry mouth.
  • Aloe Vera is not only for used for sun burns, but is an age-old remedy to treat dry mouth. It also helps protect the sensitive tissue in the mouth and enhances the taste buds. Try drinking a ¼ cup of aloe vera juice daily or rinse your mouth with aloe vera juice a few times a day.

If you feel you are experiencing more severe symptoms, please consult a physician or schedule an appointment with through the Ambulatory Care clinic at Jamaica Hospital at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

The Fight Against Obesity is a Family Affair

family dinners-517421771The childhood obesity problem in the United States has reached epidemic proportions with many political leaders and health advocates turning their attention to bringing awareness to this issue.

Interventions have been suggested, school lunches have become healthier and more attention has been given to the benefit of outside play, recess, and cutting back on the consumption of processed foods.

One of the most effective solutions to the issue of childhood obesity may be a simple one; scheduling time for a healthy family dinner. The ritual of eating meals together, as a family, has shown to greatly improve healthy eating habits.

Studies have shown that families who dine while watching television tend to be heavier than those who make to time to sit down, together, for a meal on a regular basis. As a parent, eating with your family will give you the opportunity to encourage our children to eat mindfully, reinforce healthy eating habits and teach your children to eat slowly.

Some idea’s to make family meals regular events at your house are:

  • Turn off the TV
  • Make a date to have a meal together
  • Share the meal preparation process with the whole family
  • Select a healthy alternative to a favorite meal

In addition, eating is about so much more than the food and nutrients we receive from it. Meal time should be pleasurable, social and a time to connect with each other.

If you or someone you know is struggling with obesity, contact the Jamaica Hospital Medical Center’s Ambulatory care Center to schedule an appointment with one of our licensed Nutritionist’s at 718-206-7001.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.