Rare but True – Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome is a rare, but real condition, but it doesn’t involve the Mad Hatter or the Cheshire Cat.

ThinkstockPhotos-466154054 (1)Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS) is a neurological condition where the sufferer has temporary episodes of a distorted perception of their own size and the size of things around them. People with this condition visualize themselves as big as giants or as small as insects. The objects around them also appear abnormally large or small. For instance, someone with AIWS will perceive a teacup either as big as a car or as small as a thimble.

This hallucination-like state typically lasts anywhere from five to 30 minutes. People with AIWS also may experience an impaired sense of space, with objects suddenly seeming very close or far away. In some cases, the sense of touch and sound may also be distorted.

The syndrome references the adventures from the famous novel by Lewis Carroll, where the title character Alice experiences strange events in Wonderland. Many believe that the Carroll himself suffered from this disease and was the inspiration for the story.
The cause of the condition is unknown, although the episodes have been closely associated with the onset of migraine headaches or epilepsy. AIWS can affect anyone, but it is most common in children and young adults. Episodes stop for most over time, but those who experience symptoms are recommended to see a doctor immediately.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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Quick and Easy Appetizers for Labor Day…

20100830-labordayapps

 

 

 

 

 

 

Refreshing dip, spreads and appetizer’s that will make it easy for you to dip in and chill out this Labor Day!

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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In the spirit of national waffle day…

Waffles_with_Strawberries

 

 

 

 

 

 

What are your favorite healthy waffle toppings?

1.  Strawberry

2.  Blueberry

3.  Banana

4. Other

For great waffle topping ideas visit…

http://www.walkkansas.org/doc4696.ashx

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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10 Things You Should Know When Caring For Someone with Lupus

A diagnoPurple ribbone 85501057sis of lupus can be difficult news for a patient to receive; however, it can be as equally devastating to their loved ones.  Caregivers will often face many mental and physical challenges after a diagnosis due to the unpredictability of the disease.  Lupus is described as “unpredictable” because symptoms may present themselves differently in each person.

Experts suggest that one of the best pieces of advice a caregiver could use to overcome challenges is to develop an understanding of the disease.  Through education they can become better prepared for difficulties that are likely to occur.  Knowing the basics is a good start.

Here are 10 things a caregiver should know about lupus:

  1. What is lupus? – Lupus is a chronic disorder of the immune system. It affects over 1.5 million people in the United States.  The disease causes the body to attack healthy cells and tissues.  Lupus can incur damage to the joints, kidneys, heart, blood vessels, skin, brain and lungs.
  2. Who is most likely to get lupus?-The disease is most prevalent in women of color.
  3. What causes the disease? – Currently, the cause of lupus is unknown.
  4. What are some of the symptoms? – Symptoms vary by the individual. In some cases your loved one may experience: muscle or joint pain, fatigue, hair loss, fevers, rashes around the face, headaches, seizures or chest pain. The symptoms are sometimes referred to as lupus flares.
  5. How do I handle lupus flares? – Be aware of tell-tale signs such as tiredness, rashes or other symptoms. Contact your doctor right away, so that he can recommend the appropriate treatment. If flares are stress related, try suggested methods for stress reduction.
  6. Will lupus affect my loved one’s ability to remain active? – Lupus can impair your loved ones ability to move around, especially if there is a flare up around the joints.
  7. How can I help my loved one to stay on top of their health? - Encouraging healthy eating, exercise, taking nutritional supplements and maintaining regular checkups are vital.
  8. How can I be emotionally supportive? – The best advice is to let your loved one know that you are there for them and there to listen. A diagnosis or symptoms of lupus can sometimes lead to depression; be on the alert for signs such as a loss in interests, long term sadness or helplessness.  If your loved one appears to be depressed, seek the help of a mental health professional as soon as possible.
  9. How can I maintain my own mental health? It is not uncommon for caregivers to experience bouts of depression as well.  If you are experiencing symptoms, it is recommended that you see a mental health professional. However, if you are just experiencing mental tiredness or frustration you can try activities such as exercise or joining a support group.
  10. How do I maintain proper care for my loved one? Maintaining a continuous and communicative relationship with their physician is best. Because the disease is unpredictable you should communicate changes to the doctor.  Based on information you provide, the doctor can develop a care plan for your loved one.

For more information about lupus, please contact The Lupus Center at Jamaica Hospital.  The facility is staffed by expert rheumatologists from the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and hosts various educational community outreach programs throughout the year.  To schedule an appointment, call 718-206-9888 or the Lupus Hotline at 1-877-33 LUPUS.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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Asthma and Climate Change

It is a fact that breathing difficulties associated with asthmaClimate Change are affected by climate changes. These changes in the environment bring about higher levels of ozone in the atmosphere. A higher concentration of dust and fine particles can cause existing respiratory conditions to worsen especially in the very young and the elderly.

Some of the environmental factors that affect the respiratory system are:

• Higher levels of carbon dioxide and higher temperature can lead to more spores and mold in the air.

• Climate change can lead to drought conditions which can lead to more dust in the air.

• Higher temperatures can lead to more greenhouse gases being produced.

• Environmental production of pollutants from vehicles and factories become trapped in the atmosphere.

These environmental conditions can cause chest pain, coughing, and reduced lung function for those who suffer with asthma.

Irritants that affect breathing function have definitely worsened over the years due to climate changes. People are being treated more frequently in the emergency rooms across the country due to lack of clean air to breathe.

If you would like to speak with a pulmonologist about a breathing problem, please call 718-206-7001 to schedule an appointment.

 

 

 

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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Is Your Last Child Flying the Coop?

emptynestpic-149735202If your last child is all grown up and about to leave home, or he or she has already moved out, you may experience some mixed emotions or what’s commonly called, empty next syndrome.

Empty nest syndrome is not a clinical diagnosis. It is a phenomenon in which parents may experience feelings of sadness and loss when their last child leaves home. You may worry how well your child will function in the world without your parental supervision and question their ability to take care of themselves. If you are the parent of an only child, you may have a particularly difficult time adjusting to an empty nest.

Many parents experiencing empty nest syndrome are confused by these feelings since they actively encouraged their child to become independent. Still, letting go can be painful. The feeling of not being needed by your child anymore, missing being a part of your child’s daily lives, as well as missing the constant companionship of your child can cause some parents to have mild bouts of depression, identity crisis, alcoholism and marital conflicts.

Some tips to help you overcome empty nest syndrome are:

  • Prepare for the departure – Take time to check that your child is aware of how to do the basic essentials for themselves such as, how to wash their clothes, cook for themselves, balance a checkbook and appreciate the value of money.
  • Shift aside the terrifying thoughts – Both you and your child will be better off if you treat this as a big adventure. Try not to transfer your fears onto your child. Help them to understand that once they’re into their new routine, it will be familiar, fun and successful.
  • Explore the ways that you intend to keep in touch with your child – Keeping in constant communication is vital for maintaining a sense of family togetherness and to keep of with the news. Schedule a weekly call-in time, utilize e-mail, texting, social media, Skype, or Face Time as a way of touching base while being sensitive to their need to grow and become their own adult person.
  • Start looking toward your own needs – Once you are satisfied that you child is settled on the right bath, you will start noticing a big change in your life. This is a great time to revive some of your own interests and pursuits.
  • Rediscover the love of your life – Unless you are a single parent, you will be left with your spouse or partner. Re-kindling the relationship you shared, pre-children, can be an exciting adventure of your own to take.
  • Focus on some of the positive points of your kids moving out – You may notice that the refrigerator does not need as frequent refilling, there are less trips to the grocery store and the laundry has decreased. Seeing the brighter side will help you while you are transitioning.

As the time for your child to fly the next approaches, try to reflect on each stage in your child’s life. Each ending was a new beginning. Stay positive, the fact that your child has confidently left home means you’ve done a great job as a parent. After leaving the nest, you can forge a new and even better relationship with your child as independent adults. Enjoy the friendship without having the pressure of hands-on parenting

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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Satisfying the Picky Eater’s Appetite

As parents, we want to give our children the best opportunity to help them grow and thrive. As your toddler continues to develop, their newfound independence includes choosing their own foods and creating a palate of likes and dislikes. Breakfast, lunch and dinner time can all seem like a never ending struggle to feed your picky eater. Parents, be assured this is a common phase in your child’s growth and will not last forever.

Aside from patience, here are a few tips to help feed your picky eater and some super foods that could help fill the nutritional gaps you may be worried they are not receiving.

  • Keep ThinkstockPhotos-177849015snacking to a minimum. Spoiling your child’s appetite with non-nutritional snacks in between meals can hinder your goal of trying to have them eat your healthy meals. If snacking is inevitable, try healthier options such as vegetable crudites or items that are protein packed.
  • Introduce new foods slowly. It may take several tries to actually have your child take on a new food- be patient.
  • Small portions can lead to big results. Remember, your toddler’s stomach is as large as their fist, which is pretty small. Small portions can make a big difference in their diet.
  • Involve your child. Allowing your children to be a part of the prep and cooking process can help ease any anxieties they may have towards trying new foods.
  • Keep your child interested but don’t bribe and never use food as a reward or punishment.

Lastly, try sneaking in those super-foods into their meals which can offer nutritional benefits without the fighting:

  • EggsThinkstockPhotos-164660677
  • Yogurt
  • Tomatoes
  • Black Bean
  • Cabbage
  • Fruits
  • Spices: Cinnamon and Basil.

If you are really concerned about your toddler’s eating habits, keep a food and drink journal over the week. Ensure your child has had something from each of the four main food groups. These include starchy foods, protein, dairy products, fruits and vegetables.  If you know your toddler has eaten foods from each group, you probably shouldn’t worry.

Speak with your pediatrician if you need advice or support. They can check your toddler’s weight and height, and are likely to reassure you that there is no problem. If there are any issues, they will give you tips and advice to help you get back on track.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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Just for the Taste of it

ThinkstockPhotos-478937693The next time you sit down to enjoy your favorite tasting food or beverage, remember to thank your taste buds.

Here are some fun facts about those tiny sensory organs that allow you to experience everything sweet, salty, sour, and bitter.

• See those tiny bumps on your tongue? Those are NOT your taste buds. They are called papillae and they contain taste buds inside them. You can’t actually see your taste buds.

• Taste buds are not the only part of your body responsible for detecting flavor. Olfactory receptors in your nose help you smell. They send messages to your brain and work together with your taste buds to create your sense of taste.

• Contrary to what you learned as a kid, different parts of your tongue aren’t responsible for detecting specific flavors. All regions of the tongue can detect all tastes, although some areas are more sensitive to certain flavors.

• Taste buds aren’t just on your tongue. They can also be found on the roof of your mouth and in your throat. We all have different amount of taste buds, but most people have 10,000 on average.

• Taste buds only live approximately 10 – 14 days. We constantly regenerate new taste buds, but fewer taste buds grow back as we get older.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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History of Eyeglasses

Over 60 percent of the adult population in the United States today wears eyeglasses. Modern day eyeglasses have their roots that date back more than 1000 years. In the middle ages Monks were known to use reading stones that were glass spheres, sometimes filled with water,  that were placed on top of objects in order to magnify them. The first documented use of eyeglasses was attributed to being developed in Italy.  In the 13th century Venetian glass blowers made the first solid glass lenses that were held by frames and that were a primitive version of modern day wearable eyeglasses.
In the 17th century eyeglasses started to be made that could correct vision. Glasses could be made with either concave lenses, for nearsightedness, or convex lenses for farsightedness. Benjamin Franklin invented bifocal lenses in 1784. Glass was the material used in the production of eyeglasses for centuries until the latter part of the 20th century when plastic became widely used in eyeglasses as it was lighter and safer than glass. Now many eyeglasses are being made from polycarbonate which is lighter still and more resilient to scratches.Eye glasses

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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Food That Diabetics Should Avoid

Sneak Food -78182895Living with diabetes often requires a change in diet.   Diabetics are encouraged to eat healthier and avoid food that will trigger spikes in blood sugar levels. Learning which food is good or bad for people with diabetes can be confusing.  Lorena Ackerman, Certified Diabetes Educator at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center offered clarification and shared a list of some of the food diabetics should avoid.

It is highly recommended that diabetics steer clear of the following:

  • Highly processed food such as white rice or any products made with white flour can cause an elevation of blood sugar levels.
  • Fruit juices may sound harmless because they are made from fruit; however, most tend be high in added sugar. Opt for water as a beverage instead.
  • French fries are packed with carbohydrates and fats, which can be disastrous for blood sugar levels.
  • Canned fruits stored in syrup are not recommended because the syrup tends to have high levels of added sugar.
  • Candy is a no-no because it can cause dramatic increases in glucose levels.
  • Dried fruits such as raisins or prunes may sound like a healthy option, but they are not. Sugars in fruits become very concentrated during the dehydration process.
  • Whole milk is high in saturated fats, which can negatively affect insulin resistance.

Ms. Ackerman explained, “Eating the wrong food can be very dangerous for a person with diabetes.”  She continued, “Food that is laden with fat, carbohydrates or added sugars, can cause diabetic symptoms such as dizziness, frequent urination or fatigue to occur.”

If you have been recently diagnosed with diabetes, it is recommended that you speak with a dietary professional to learn about food in relation to diabetes.  Choosing the wrong food can be detrimental to your health.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center is offering a free nutritional class “What Can I Eat?” for people with diabetes.  The interactive program educates participants on daily nutrition and tips on preparing diabetic-friendly meals. Classes begin in the fall. To register, contact Elena Toumaras at 718-206-7056 or email, etoumara@jhmc.org.

All content of this newsletter is intended for general information purposes only and is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a medical professional before adopting any of the suggestions on this page. You must never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking medical treatment based upon any content of this newsletter. PROMPTLY CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR CALL 911 IF YOU BELIEVE YOU HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY.

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