Weight-Loss Pills

According to the Food Research Action Center, about 68.5% of people in the United States are obese. With this statistic rising each year, many people are desperate to shed pounds, but have a hard time losing a significant amount by diet and exercise alone. Due to this struggle, a majority of the population has resorted to taking weight-loss pills, but is this a healthy choice?

 Weight-loss pills can be appealing because of their convenience and their ability to dramatically affect weight loss in a short amount of time, but these results are not guaranteed and are surrounded by many negatives and damaging to one’s health. Over-the-counter diet pills can be dangerous because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate them as closely as other medications. This makes their ingredients, their effectiveness, and their risk a mystery to the user.
 Some of the most common side effects of over-the-counter weight-loss pills include:
• Upset stomach
• Raised blood pressure and heart rate
• Dizziness
• Nausea

Prescription weight-loss pills are regulated by the FDA, but are only administered to people with a body mass index (BMI) of 30 and higher and have other health problems, such as diabetes and high cholesterol. If these pills are not taken exactly as the doctor prescribes them, they can lead to increased heart rate and poor sleep, which can ultimately cause a heart attack or stroke.

There is no easy solution to obesity. Even if you are taking weight-loss pills, eating too much fat can decrease the product’s ability to produce the desired result and cause weight gain and other detrimental effects on your body. Instead of spending money on weight-loss pills, try some healthy alternatives, such as playing a sport or going on a regulated diet. An active lifestyle and healthy eating habits can help you lose weight and keep it off permanently.

Are you taking a weight-loss pill and aren’t sure of its effectiveness or its side effects? A physician at the Family Medicine Ambulatory Care Center at Jamaica Hospital can help. Please call 718-206-6942.

Knee Repalcemrent

Today total knee replacement is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. Hundreds of thousands of people undergo this procedure annually in order to relieve their pain and suffering due to arthritic conditions and also due to trauma.

The first known knee replacement was performed in the 1890’s. Back then an ivory hinged apparatus’ was used to replace the knee joint. Many complications occurred from this primitive procedure and it wasn’t widely used due to the high rate of infection. In the 1950’s and 1960’s hinged apparatus’ were used in knee replacement surgery but they often didn’t last long, and they didn’t fully restore range of motion to the knee joint. The modern era of total knee replacement really began in the 1970’s. Thanks to advances in medical technology, knee replacement implants are now able to last up to 20 years, and range of motion is almost the same as that of a normal knee.

Total knee replacement surgery involves replacement of the damaged or diseased knee joint with either plastic or metal components that allow for proper range of motion. While total knee replacement is the more common variation of this procedure, approximately 20 percent of people are able to have a partial knee replacement procedure performed. The determining factor is the severity of the deformity.

It is estimated that by the year 2030, as a larger percentage of the population ages, the number of procedures performed annually will be more than 3 million. Most people who have had knee replacement surgery lead fully active lives and the quality of their lives is undoubtedly improved owing to the procedure. For more information about knee replacement surgery, please feel free to call our Orthopedic Department to schedule an appointment. They can be reached at 718-206-6923.

Knee Replacement

Today total knee replacement is one of the most commonly performed orthopedic surgical procedures. Hundreds of thousands of people undergo this procedure annually in order to relieve their pain and suffering due to arthritic conditions and also due to trauma.

 The first known knee replacement was performed in the 1890’s. Back then an ivory hinged apparatus’ was used to replace the knee joint. Many complications occurred from this primitive procedure and it wasn’t widely used due to the high rate of infection. In the 1950’s and 1960’s hinged apparatus’ were used in knee replacement surgery but they often didn’t last long, and they didn’t fully restore range of motion to the knee joint. The modern era of total knee replacement really began in the 1970’s.  Thanks to advances in medical technology, knee replacement implants are now able to last up to 20 years, and range of motion is almost the same as that of a normal knee.

Total knee replacement surgery involves replacement of the damaged or diseased knee joint with either plastic or metal components that allow for proper range of motion. While total knee replacement is the more common variation of this procedure, approximately 20 percent of people are able to have a partial knee replacement procedure performed. The determining factor is the severity of the deformity.

It is estimated that by the year 2030, as a larger percentage of the population ages, the number of procedures performed annually will be more than 3 million. Most people who have had knee replacement surgery lead fully active lives and the quality of their lives is undoubtedly improved owing to the procedure. For more information about knee replacement surgery, please feel free to call our Orthopedic Department to schedule an appointment. They can be reached at 718-206-6923.

Asthma and Allergies

 

The most common form of asthma is caused by an allergic reaction. More than fifty percent of people who suffer from asthma have this type of disease. Asthma is an airway obstruction caused by inflammation and is a reaction that people have when they are exposed to substances that they are allergic to. Some of the offending substances are pet dander, pollen, dust mites, mold and some foods. An asthma attack has three components: 

  • The bands of muscles surrounding the airways in the lungs tighten. This is called broncospasm. 
  • The lining of the airways become inflamed and swollen.
  • There is an increase in mucous production in the lining of the airway.

 All of these factors make it harder for air to pass through the lungs, and breathing becomes difficult. 

Treatment for allergy induced asthma requires testing to see what a person is allergic to. Once these allergens have been identified the patient will be advised to avoid them. There is no cure for asthma but, there are several medications available that can help control it. Antihistamines are often administered, which help reduce the allergic reaction. A physician may prescribe corticosteroids to reduce the inflammation of the airway and make breathing easier. Some medications are given for immediate relief of symptoms. Such as broncodilators which are inhaled as needed to help to relax the airways. Other medications are used for long term control of symptoms and are taken on a daily basis. Speak to your physician if you experience difficulty breathing after coming in contact with certain substances. There are different treatment options available and you want to learn about the one that will be best for you.  You can also schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist  atJamaicaHospitalby calling 718-206-6742.

Vaporizer Pen

 The vaporizer pen, or the “vape,” is a modern e-cigarette that is shaped like a pen. This pen is only sold in select stores and online sites, yet it has grown wildly popular on the east and west coast. It is believed that the vaporizer pen has gained its popularity because of its sleek, portable design, its affordability, and its functionality that allows the user to use the pen in a variety of ways.

How it works:
Various substances, such as wax, flavored oils (known as e-juices), and dry herbs, are placed inside the compact chamber of the pen. When the user clicks the round button on the base of the pen, the chamber begins to heat up in order to produce the vapor from the chosen substance. The battery that heats the chamber and fuels the pen is usually rechargeable, depending on the model, and can be taken apart for easy cleaning.

While this pen can be used to help people quit smoking, it can also encourage people to start. Even though the legal age to purchase cigarettes or e-cigs is 21 in New York, the vaporizer pen is much easier to purchase for minors. It is as simple as clicking “yes” on a website for a minor to purchase the item without any official authorization. Additionally, in a poll by Center for Disease Control (CDC), the number of middle and high school students who have tried the vaporizer pen has doubled in the last year alone, with a large majority of these students had never smoked an actual cigarette. This suggests that instead of helping people quit smoking, this pen is encouraging young people to start an unhealthy habit, creating a new generation of potential smokers.

According to Vaporizer Pen Guide, it is safe to “vape” in public because it has “no harmful effects on the user,” and, therefore, it is not harmful to the general public. However, New York State has banned vaping in indoor public places and California has banned vaping in any place that smoking is prohibited. The vaporizer pen is not FDA approved, which makes the safety of this product and the substances it is filled with uncertain.

Are you trying to quit smoking? Here are some healthy alternatives to a vaporizer pen:
• Nicotine replacement therapy
• Chew gum
• Participate in physical activities
• Practice relaxation techniques

For more information on how to quit smoking or for a consultation, please call Jamaica Hospital’s Pulmonary Department at 718-206-5916.

Summer Tip: Insulin Storage

We would never waste our food or allow it to become spoiled by the heat, but what about medicines? Medicines should not be the exception, specifically insulin.

Insulin is a protein which is dissolved in water and is required to manage blood sugar levels in diabetics. As with any protein, bacteria can grow in insulin, making it susceptible to become spoiled. Bacteria can also break down the proteins in insulin and makes it less effective. Keeping insulin cool can help prevent it from spoiling and maintain its effectiveness. The recommended temperature for storage, once opened, should be anywhere from 59-68 degrees Fahrenheit. For insulin not in use, store between 36-46 degrees Fahrenheit. For many diabetics, insulin is most comfortably administered at room temperature.

Some other storage tips include:
• Do not freeze or use thawed insulin. The freezing temperature will break down the proteins and will not work to lower blood sugar levels.
• Do not leave in sunlight. This can break down the proteins in insulin as well.
• Inspect insulin prior to each use. Ensure that there are no clumps, crystals or particles in the bottle or pen. Insulin should be clear.
• Write the ‘start use’ date on the insulin vial and discard after 28 days or if it’s been opened.
• Never use expired insulin.
• Be wary of any unusual smells. Insulin should never have an odor or bad smell.

Insulin is administered in many forms including injections, pens or cartridges. Each may have different recommended storage times based on their manufacturer. It is important to check with a pharmacist, package insert, or the manufacturers’ website to ensure proper storage temperature of insulin.

Jamaica Hospital Medical Center operates a retail pharmacy. The hours of operation for the Pharmacy are: Monday through Friday 9:00am to 7:00pm and Saturday, 8:00am to 6:00pm. For any further questions on medication storage, please feel free to contact 718-206-8515.

Summer Weight Loss Tips For Kids

Is your child at risk of gaining weight this summer? 

We consider summer to be a time when kids run around, go swimming and generally remain active. With all this physical activity, it is a common belief that children keep weight off or maybe even lose a few pounds in the summer, but that is not the case. There are many reasons why parents are now noticing that their children are actually gaining weight during the summer.

The rate of childhood obesity has tripled in America in recent decades. Now, one out of three children in this country is considered overweight or obese. When are children gaining the most weight?  Recent studies have revealed that during the summer, the rate of weight gain in children is double that of the rest of the year. Why?

One of the biggest contributing factors is that children today live a more sedentary lifestyle. During the school year, children participate in fitness programs, both during recess and in physical education classes. Without a regimented exercise program, children opt to spend their free time playing video games or watching television.

Another factor in summer weight gain is the foods children have access to in their home. In an effort to fight obesity and promote healthy eating habits, many schools provide healthy alternatives for lunches and snacks during the year. During the summer, however, kids have access to whatever snacks are in the home. Kids will often choose unhealthy snacks, such as cookies, chips, and soda, if they are available to them.

In an effort to reverse this trend, Jamaica Hospital offers the following summer healthy living tips for your kids:

• Stock your home with healthy food options like yogurt, carrots, or summer fruits like peaches, berries, or melons.

• Make water the beverage of choice. Juices and sodas are high in calories and low in nutrients. To make water more flavorful, consider adding fruit slices or berries.

• Limit TV and video game usage. It will force kids to become more physically active and prevent them from enticing junk food commercials..

• Walk more. Everyone can do it. Incorporate regular family walks to the park or around the neighborhood.

• Be inventive. Not every child is interested in formal team sports, but every kid loves to run around. Encourage activities like hopscotch, jump rope or a simple game of “tag.”

• Be a role mode. Children often take cues from their parent’s eating habits so if you want your kids to eat healthier, you should eat healthier

Asthma and Exercise

Do your asthma attacks coincide with participation in physical activity such as exercise? As in all types of asthma, the airways tighten, it becomes difficult to take a complete breath, and the airways produce extra mucous.

The symptoms of exertional asthma include: 

  • Wheezing
  • Tightness of the chest
  • Coughing
  • Feeling tired
  • Inability to catch your breath

 Some activities that can lead to heavier than normal breathing such as recreational sports including  running, basketball, football, soccer, and aerobic exercise. These can lead to  exertional asthma.  Additionally, when the air is cold and dry, activities  such as shoveling snow or walking for long periods of time can also trigger an asthma attack.

 Other contributing factors of exertional asthma can include: 

  • Smoke or smog
  • High pollen counts
  • Having a cold or other respiratory infection
  • Chlorinated pools or other chemical irritants

 Treatment of exertional asthma includes taking medications both on a regular basis and  prior to doing strenuous exercise to limit symptoms and control breathing. Some activities and sports should be avoided if they bring on asthma attacks.

If you are experience difficulty breathing while participating in strenuous activities, you should consult with a pulmonary specialist for a complete respiratory evaluation. Please call 718-206-6742 to schedule an appointment with a pulmonologist at Jamaica Hospital.

Don’ t Sweat it!!

As the mercury rises, you have to think about what you can do to keep cool.  Heat exhaustion is a common malady during the summer months.  As the heat index pushes closer to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, you may not have to feel the heat.  All you have to do is break out that cold bottle of water from your fridge.

Hydrating with cool water on a hot and humid day will help protect you against summer dehydration.

 Some the most common signs of dehydration are:

  • General  fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Increased body temperature
  • Weakness
  • Muscle cramps

Ignoring these signs may lead to heat stroke, which requires medical treatment.

The best way to combat dehydration is to drink fluids.  The American College of Sports Medicine recommends drinking:

  • 16-20 ounces of water before moderate-intensity summer exercise
  • 8-12 ounces 10-15 minutes before going out into the heat
  • 3-8 ounces every 15-20 minutes during activity when active for less than one hour
  • 3-8 ounces of a sports beverage every 15-20 minutes when exercise greater than one hour

Other means of keeping your cool during the summer months is to wear lighter, breathable fabrics, slow down your pace, exercise indoors, wear a hot and just using common sense when planning your day outdoors.

The tips in this article are general, so remember that you are an individual and your needs may be specific.  Remember to use your head and stay cool!

It’s Summer – Let’s Pick Some Fruit!

 

 

                                                                                         Summer is here and fruits are in abundance in our markets and grocery stores.  There is nothing more appetizing to the eye than a bowl full of colorful fruit.  However, just because the fruit looks good, it isn’t necessarily good for you.

 According to the site www.Fruitsinfo.com, there are fruits that can be way too high in fat to eat regularly.  Click the link below to find out which fruits are most healthy and lower in fat.

 http://www.fruitsinfo.com/summer-fruits.html

 Keep in mind that all types of fruit, in moderation, are healthy for your.

 Enjoy the summer!!